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Author Topic: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?  (Read 6002 times)

Offline MyTeVyKn

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #60 on: August 20, 2014, 11:19:13 PM »

I'm going to have to disagree with you on a few points.

Quote
and, by reducing the strike zone, doesn't necessarily mean walking a lot.  you can only walk a team 4 times before they score a run without hitting the ball.  pitchers are not gonna let that happen.  pitchers would rather make you "earn" your runs than just give them to you for free.  no pitcher is gonna intentionally walk 3 or 4 guys in a row.  reducing the strike zone will make the game more about "defense" than pitching because there would be many more hits to defend than now.

Reducing the strike zone will make it harder to throw strikes.  Which means you will get more walks.  You are right about the intentional walks.  The problem with the smaller strike zone is a batter with a good eye will wait on the walk if he doesn't get his pitch.  That will make the game less about defense.
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Ha, ha, this reminds me of my Umpire's "pep talk" to the coaches just before each LL game begins.  I tell them; "LOOK COACHES, MAKE SURE YOU LET YOUR PLAYERS KNOW, THAT MY STRIKE ZONE IS HIGH, AND MY STRIKE ZONE IS WIDE...  SO, WHEN THEY COME UP TO BAT, THEY BETTER COME TO HIT.  THEY BETTER BE FIGHTERS BABY!  LET'S PLAY BALL!"
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Offline Devin

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #61 on: August 21, 2014, 12:40:20 AM »
MyTeVyKn
thank you for that.  Unfortunately, you will never convince some of these people.  ::)
I'm watching a game right now on the MLB network.

Do you get that channel?  

You're welcome MG and Yes, I do.  Some folk just don't know that the work you have to put in really is hard work to play the game of baseball.  This is the very reason why Bo Jackson, "Neon Deon" Sanders, and to a lesser degree Michael Jordan were such phenomenal athletes when they played this game, football, and basketball on it's highest level.  I was really hoping that Russell Wilson would hang tough and join there ranks but its probably best that he didn't as he may not have wound up to be the QB that made history beating Peyton Manning for a SBC.

Anyway, the work ethic it takes to play this game is just like life.  As I mentioned earlier the rules, sizes, and dimensions keep changing.  So, you either put in the work to stay in the game or you turn to another sport with more glitter and glamour.  

You can pretty much say that about any sport.

Offline Blue N Gold

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #62 on: August 21, 2014, 02:44:57 PM »
I hope that black boys will again embrace the game of baseball. :nod:

Offline RamMan4Life

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #63 on: August 22, 2014, 10:07:32 AM »
I think so. I got away from the game after years of watching. My father and grandfather got me into it and listening to stories about spring training games in Tampa, Negro league games and the rich history surrounding it made me like it. I never played but I do like the game. I'm just so busy that it's hard for me to devote an entire chunk of time to a sporting event like that.
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Offline Ram55

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #64 on: August 22, 2014, 10:42:42 AM »
Our kids are getting lazier and lazier, playing less and less outside. It won't be long before most of Americas professional athletes will be foreign. There is no way baseball will get back the black community. The attendance at HBCU sporting events are dropping at an alarming rate. Our fans are too broke, lazy, or both, to go to sporting events. Plus, the kids that do make it out side to play sure can't find enough of his friends to play a pick-up game of baseball. Where will they get the special equipment to play. Football and basketball only require one person out of 40 to have one ball to start a game.

Offline oleschoolaggie

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #65 on: August 22, 2014, 11:55:40 AM »
reduce the strike zone?   :lmao:

I thought you wanted to speed up the game?  that would only increase walking.

why not outlaw curve balls, sliders...hell just set it on tee for you ADHD peeps.

Hand / eye coordination in a sport is athleticism.... imo

since when does your hands and eyes make you "athletic"?  hands and eyes don't win 100 meter sprints, legs do!  you mean to tell me you think someone who uses their hands and eyes extremely well is athletic?  dude, pub-leeeze.

and, by reducing the strike zone, doesn't necessarily mean walking a lot.  you can only walk a team 4 times before they score a run without hitting the ball.  pitchers are not gonna let that happen.  pitchers would rather make you "earn" your runs than just give them to you for free.  no pitcher is gonna intentionally walk 3 or 4 guys in a row.  reducing the strike zone will make the game more about "defense" than pitching because there would be many more hits to defend than now.  right now, an out fielder could literally eat a pizza in left field and not miss a beat.  reducing the strike zone would put an end to that because the hits would be coming far more frequently.

i would also place limits on how many times a manager or teammate can walk onto the field to talk to his pitcher.  i'd give each team a maximum of maybe 3 or 4 "timeouts" per game, otherwise they can't walk onto the field and stop the game whenever they feel like it.  you could also place a time limit on the time between each pitch, sorta like the nfl's play clock or the nba's shot clock.

there's a lot of changes that could speed up the pace and increase scoring in baseball.  but baseball is too "conservative" and too much influenced by "tradition" to make those changes.  change the rules and make the game more entertaining and more action oriented...

I'm going to have to disagree with you on a few points.

Quote
and, by reducing the strike zone, doesn't necessarily mean walking a lot.  you can only walk a team 4 times before they score a run without hitting the ball.  pitchers are not gonna let that happen.  pitchers would rather make you "earn" your runs than just give them to you for free.  no pitcher is gonna intentionally walk 3 or 4 guys in a row.  reducing the strike zone will make the game more about "defense" than pitching because there would be many more hits to defend than now.

Reducing the strike zone will make it harder to throw strikes.  Which means you will get more walks.  You are right about the intentional walks.  The problem with the smaller strike zone is a batter with a good eye will wait on the walk if he doesn't get his pitch.  That will make the game less about defense.

Quote
i would also place limits on how many times a manager or teammate can walk onto the field to talk to his pitcher.  i'd give each team a maximum of maybe 3 or 4 "timeouts" per game, otherwise they can't walk onto the field and stop the game whenever they feel like it.  you could also place a time limit on the time between each pitch, sorta like the nfl's play clock or the nba's shot clock.

Umpires actually do a good job on the timeouts at the mound.  Batters slow the game up even more.  Batters can step out the box after every pitch and clean their spikes, stretch, pick their nose (I saw a kid do that in Little League), etc. 

Quote
there's a lot of changes that could speed up the pace and increase scoring in baseball.  but baseball is too "conservative" and too much influenced by "tradition" to make those changes.  change the rules and make the game more entertaining and more action oriented..

I agree with that.  The problem with MLB is TV and radio.  They have a certain amount of ads that have to run between at-bats.  That part is not going to change anytime soon.  It is even creeping into MiLB as well. It now takes around two hours to play a MiLB game.  This is because of the radio and TV sponsors.

i disagree, but respect your opinion.  most mlb pitchers can put the ball over the plate 90% of the time if they chose to.  to me, if you reduce the strike zone, it will “force” the pitchers to throw “strikes”.  the whole idea behind reducing the strike zone is to take away some of the advantages that pitchers have.  strikeouts will become more rare and batting averages will “increase” if you reduce the strike zone.  like i said before, a pitcher is not gonna give away “free runs” and that’s exactly what will happen if he walks a bunch of guys.

eventually the pitchers will realize that the rule changes (reduced strike zone) have taken away a lot of their ammunition and “force them” to throw strikes.  on the other hand, i think you are trying to retain the same mindset of today’s pitchers despite a smaller strike zone and you can’t do that.  reduce the strike zone and pitchers will come to realize that the rule change is shifting baseball from a pitcher’s game to a batter’s game.  again, a pitcher is only gonna walk but so many batters before he realizes that he has to throw “strikes”.

it would completely and fundamentally “change the game” of baseball and that’s what the sport needs if it wants to attract more fans and more aa players.  but i think you’re trying to hold onto “tradition” just like the rest of baseball does.  you seem as if you don’t want to see pitchers lose any of their advantages.  i’m saying yes, take away some of the pitchers advantages so that hitting becomes easier and more offense/home runs/scoring is generated...

Offline y04185

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #66 on: August 22, 2014, 12:04:57 PM »
reduce the strike zone?   :lmao:

I thought you wanted to speed up the game?  that would only increase walking.

why not outlaw curve balls, sliders...hell just set it on tee for you ADHD peeps.

Hand / eye coordination in a sport is athleticism.... imo

since when does your hands and eyes make you "athletic"?  hands and eyes don't win 100 meter sprints, legs do!  you mean to tell me you think someone who uses their hands and eyes extremely well is athletic?  dude, pub-leeeze.

and, by reducing the strike zone, doesn't necessarily mean walking a lot.  you can only walk a team 4 times before they score a run without hitting the ball.  pitchers are not gonna let that happen.  pitchers would rather make you "earn" your runs than just give them to you for free.  no pitcher is gonna intentionally walk 3 or 4 guys in a row.  reducing the strike zone will make the game more about "defense" than pitching because there would be many more hits to defend than now.  right now, an out fielder could literally eat a pizza in left field and not miss a beat.  reducing the strike zone would put an end to that because the hits would be coming far more frequently.

i would also place limits on how many times a manager or teammate can walk onto the field to talk to his pitcher.  i'd give each team a maximum of maybe 3 or 4 "timeouts" per game, otherwise they can't walk onto the field and stop the game whenever they feel like it.  you could also place a time limit on the time between each pitch, sorta like the nfl's play clock or the nba's shot clock.

there's a lot of changes that could speed up the pace and increase scoring in baseball.  but baseball is too "conservative" and too much influenced by "tradition" to make those changes.  change the rules and make the game more entertaining and more action oriented...

I'm going to have to disagree with you on a few points.

Quote
and, by reducing the strike zone, doesn't necessarily mean walking a lot.  you can only walk a team 4 times before they score a run without hitting the ball.  pitchers are not gonna let that happen.  pitchers would rather make you "earn" your runs than just give them to you for free.  no pitcher is gonna intentionally walk 3 or 4 guys in a row.  reducing the strike zone will make the game more about "defense" than pitching because there would be many more hits to defend than now.

Reducing the strike zone will make it harder to throw strikes.  Which means you will get more walks.  You are right about the intentional walks.  The problem with the smaller strike zone is a batter with a good eye will wait on the walk if he doesn't get his pitch.  That will make the game less about defense.

Quote
i would also place limits on how many times a manager or teammate can walk onto the field to talk to his pitcher.  i'd give each team a maximum of maybe 3 or 4 "timeouts" per game, otherwise they can't walk onto the field and stop the game whenever they feel like it.  you could also place a time limit on the time between each pitch, sorta like the nfl's play clock or the nba's shot clock.

Umpires actually do a good job on the timeouts at the mound.  Batters slow the game up even more.  Batters can step out the box after every pitch and clean their spikes, stretch, pick their nose (I saw a kid do that in Little League), etc. 

Quote
there's a lot of changes that could speed up the pace and increase scoring in baseball.  but baseball is too "conservative" and too much influenced by "tradition" to make those changes.  change the rules and make the game more entertaining and more action oriented..

I agree with that.  The problem with MLB is TV and radio.  They have a certain amount of ads that have to run between at-bats.  That part is not going to change anytime soon.  It is even creeping into MiLB as well. It now takes around two hours to play a MiLB game.  This is because of the radio and TV sponsors.

i disagree, but respect your opinion.  most mlb pitchers can put the ball over the plate 90% of the time if they chose to.  to me, if you reduce the strike zone, it will “force” the pitchers to throw “strikes”.  the whole idea behind reducing the strike zone is to take away some of the advantages that pitchers have.  strikeouts will become more rare and batting averages will “increase” if you reduce the strike zone.  like i said before, a pitcher is not gonna give away “free runs” and that’s exactly what will happen if he walks a bunch of guys.

eventually the pitchers will realize that the rule changes (reduced strike zone) have taken away a lot of their ammunition and “force them” to throw strikes.  on the other hand, i think you are trying to retain the same mindset of today’s pitchers despite a smaller strike zone and you can’t do that.  reduce the strike zone and pitchers will come to realize that the rule change is shifting baseball from a pitcher’s game to a batter’s game.  again, a pitcher is only gonna walk but so many batters before he realizes that he has to throw “strikes”.

it would completely and fundamentally “change the game” of baseball and that’s what the sport needs if it wants to attract more fans and more aa players.  but i think you’re trying to hold onto “tradition” just like the rest of baseball does.  you seem as if you don’t want to see pitchers lose any of their advantages.  i’m saying yes, take away some of the pitchers advantages so that hitting becomes easier and more offense/home runs/scoring is generated...


I understand your position.  I disagree.  The batter should be able to hit the pitch in the current strike zone.  I don't believe the pitcher has an advantage.  In MLB the pitcher lost a big advantage when they lowered the mound.
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Offline oleschoolaggie

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #67 on: August 22, 2014, 12:14:10 PM »
reduce the strike zone?   :lmao:

I thought you wanted to speed up the game?  that would only increase walking.

why not outlaw curve balls, sliders...hell just set it on tee for you ADHD peeps.

Hand / eye coordination in a sport is athleticism.... imo

since when does your hands and eyes make you "athletic"?  hands and eyes don't win 100 meter sprints, legs do!  you mean to tell me you think someone who uses their hands and eyes extremely well is athletic?  dude, pub-leeeze.

and, by reducing the strike zone, doesn't necessarily mean walking a lot.  you can only walk a team 4 times before they score a run without hitting the ball.  pitchers are not gonna let that happen.  pitchers would rather make you "earn" your runs than just give them to you for free.  no pitcher is gonna intentionally walk 3 or 4 guys in a row.  reducing the strike zone will make the game more about "defense" than pitching because there would be many more hits to defend than now.  right now, an out fielder could literally eat a pizza in left field and not miss a beat.  reducing the strike zone would put an end to that because the hits would be coming far more frequently.

i would also place limits on how many times a manager or teammate can walk onto the field to talk to his pitcher.  i'd give each team a maximum of maybe 3 or 4 "timeouts" per game, otherwise they can't walk onto the field and stop the game whenever they feel like it.  you could also place a time limit on the time between each pitch, sorta like the nfl's play clock or the nba's shot clock.

there's a lot of changes that could speed up the pace and increase scoring in baseball.  but baseball is too "conservative" and too much influenced by "tradition" to make those changes.  change the rules and make the game more entertaining and more action oriented...

I'm going to have to disagree with you on a few points.

Quote
and, by reducing the strike zone, doesn't necessarily mean walking a lot.  you can only walk a team 4 times before they score a run without hitting the ball.  pitchers are not gonna let that happen.  pitchers would rather make you "earn" your runs than just give them to you for free.  no pitcher is gonna intentionally walk 3 or 4 guys in a row.  reducing the strike zone will make the game more about "defense" than pitching because there would be many more hits to defend than now.

Reducing the strike zone will make it harder to throw strikes.  Which means you will get more walks.  You are right about the intentional walks.  The problem with the smaller strike zone is a batter with a good eye will wait on the walk if he doesn't get his pitch.  That will make the game less about defense.

Quote
i would also place limits on how many times a manager or teammate can walk onto the field to talk to his pitcher.  i'd give each team a maximum of maybe 3 or 4 "timeouts" per game, otherwise they can't walk onto the field and stop the game whenever they feel like it.  you could also place a time limit on the time between each pitch, sorta like the nfl's play clock or the nba's shot clock.

Umpires actually do a good job on the timeouts at the mound.  Batters slow the game up even more.  Batters can step out the box after every pitch and clean their spikes, stretch, pick their nose (I saw a kid do that in Little League), etc. 

Quote
there's a lot of changes that could speed up the pace and increase scoring in baseball.  but baseball is too "conservative" and too much influenced by "tradition" to make those changes.  change the rules and make the game more entertaining and more action oriented..

I agree with that.  The problem with MLB is TV and radio.  They have a certain amount of ads that have to run between at-bats.  That part is not going to change anytime soon.  It is even creeping into MiLB as well. It now takes around two hours to play a MiLB game.  This is because of the radio and TV sponsors.

i disagree, but respect your opinion.  most mlb pitchers can put the ball over the plate 90% of the time if they chose to.  to me, if you reduce the strike zone, it will “force” the pitchers to throw “strikes”.  the whole idea behind reducing the strike zone is to take away some of the advantages that pitchers have.  strikeouts will become more rare and batting averages will “increase” if you reduce the strike zone.  like i said before, a pitcher is not gonna give away “free runs” and that’s exactly what will happen if he walks a bunch of guys.

eventually the pitchers will realize that the rule changes (reduced strike zone) have taken away a lot of their ammunition and “force them” to throw strikes.  on the other hand, i think you are trying to retain the same mindset of today’s pitchers despite a smaller strike zone and you can’t do that.  reduce the strike zone and pitchers will come to realize that the rule change is shifting baseball from a pitcher’s game to a batter’s game.  again, a pitcher is only gonna walk but so many batters before he realizes that he has to throw “strikes”.

it would completely and fundamentally “change the game” of baseball and that’s what the sport needs if it wants to attract more fans and more aa players.  but i think you’re trying to hold onto “tradition” just like the rest of baseball does.  you seem as if you don’t want to see pitchers lose any of their advantages.  i’m saying yes, take away some of the pitchers advantages so that hitting becomes easier and more offense/home runs/scoring is generated...


I understand your position.  I disagree.  The batter should be able to hit the pitch in the current strike zone.  I don't believe the pitcher has an advantage.  In MLB the pitcher lost a big advantage when they lowered the mound.

indeed the batter can hit the ball in the current strike zone about 25% of the time on average, but that's not enough to generate more offense.  i think you're just a "traditionalist" just like most hardcore baseball fans and you don't want to sacrifice tradition.  but i'd like to see batting averages increase significantly and the best way to do that is to reduce the strike zone. 

bring more "action" to the game.  make those infielders and outfielders work harder!  take all the power away from the pitchers, no more "no hitters" would occur with a reduced strike zone.  i can foresee average batting averages increasing to about 40% with the best hitters averaging 50% or better which would be fantastic!

Offline Devin

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #68 on: August 22, 2014, 12:33:48 PM »
Shrinking the strike zone would actually make the games longer.

Offline Maroon and Gray

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #69 on: August 22, 2014, 01:17:16 PM »
Shrinking the strike zone would actually make the games longer.

yep.

not to mention would any of these people calling for more offense actually support a ML team?  Buy the MLB cable package?  doubtful.

The suggestion about reducing the strike zone is not necessary because good hitters don't swing at non strikes which is why their batting averages are higher.  The suggestion should be to train batters early in their careers to be better hitters, which means patience, and make contact with the ball.

Maybe those who find the current game not to their liking, should start a new game with the rules they want.  The AFL was born out of the '3 yards and a cloud of dust' the NFL used to be.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 01:19:40 PM by Maroon and Gray »

Offline ‘87 Alum

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #70 on: August 22, 2014, 02:20:44 PM »
The Cincy Reds released the following info yesterday regarding their Urban Youth Academy.  Maybe other teams can do likewise....



http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20140821&content_id=90757036&vkey=pr_cin&c_id=cin

Reds President and CEO Bob Castellini, Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig and representatives of Proctor & Gamble at 11:00 a.m. tomorrow will participate in the grand opening ceremony of the P&G Cincinnati MLB Urban Youth Academy (2026 E. Seymour Ave.)...the $7 million complex features 4 fields and a 33,000-square-foot indoor training center that will serve as the home to all of the Reds Community Fund's outreach programs...also scheduled to attend the ribbon cutting are Hall of Famers Frank Robinson and Joe Morgan and current Reds players Jay Bruce, Brandon Phillips and Joey Votto, along with city and county officials...Commissioner Selig will be available to the local media at 5:40 p.m. tomorrow in the field level interview room at Great American Ball Park.

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20130123&content_id=41118902&vkey=pr_cin&c_id=cin

Major League Baseball announces $1.5 million commitment to the development of the Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy

Facility Will Provide Free, Year-Round Baseball and Softball Instruction and Educational Programs to Greater Cincinnati Youth; The Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy Is Midwest’s First Site, Seventh Overall
Baseball Commissioner Allan H. (Bud) Selig today announced that Major League Baseball is committing $1.5 million to the development of the Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy, a future state-of-the-art facility that will provide free, year-round baseball and softball instruction and educational programs to Greater Cincinnati youth from ages six to 18.  The Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy, which will be located at Roselawn Park in Cincinnati, is also supported by Procter & Gamble, the City of Cincinnati, the Cincinnati Recreation Commission, and Reds owners and players.

“Major League Baseball is proud to join the Reds and their local partners in making this significant investment and commitment to the young people of Greater Cincinnati,” Commissioner Selig said. “The Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy will be a wonderful addition to the organization’s rich history, and we are very pleased that our latest project will be the first in the Midwest.  Our Academy will instill life values in the children of Cincinnati and provide a valuable perspective on opportunities in baseball and beyond.”

“We thank Commissioner Selig, Major League Baseball and Procter & Gamble for supporting the Reds Community Fund's grassroots efforts to provide our youth with state-of-the-art, safe baseball facilities,” said Reds President and Chief Executive Officer Bob Castellini. “Their generous financial support ensures that any youngster who falls in love with the game, as we all have, has a place to play.”

“It’s personally special to be a part of bringing this Academy to Cincinnati to make a difference in the lives of the youth of this region,” said MLB Executive Vice President of Baseball Development Frank Robinson. “It will be a great resource for improving baseball and softball skills and also making sure education remains a top priority. Cincinnati has had a lot of great baseball moments over the years, but with this Academy, the most important play on the field is yet to come.”

The Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy is the seventh announced Academy, and the first in the Midwest, joining operational facilities in Compton (California), Gurabo (Puerto Rico), Houston (Texas) and New Orleans (Louisiana).  Additional sites have been announced for Hialeah (Florida) and Philadelphia (Pennsylvania).  The Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy will be modeled after the facilities in Compton, Houston and New Orleans.  The complex will include four renovated fields and a 33,000 square foot building featuring batting cages, pitching tunnels and a full indoor field. Groundbreaking is scheduled to begin in August of 2013 with project completion expected in the spring of 2015.  Additionally, the Reds MLB Urban Youth Academy will offer educational and baseball vocation programming including tutoring, clinics and free seminars on umpiring, athletic field management, scouting and player development, sports and broadcast journalism, public relations and statistics, and athletic sports training.  The Academy’s goal will be to graduate 100 percent of the youth it serves.  “Community Days,” scouting events and other free programs are additional activities that will take place annually at the Academy.

The Reds Community Fund currently operates the Reds Urban Youth Academy at the temporary home of Cincinnati Public School’s Gamble Montessori High School in Winton Terrace.  The fall/winter session started in October and offers free baseball and softball instruction six days a week to boys and girls from Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky public schools.

Having opened its first facility in Compton in 2006, the network of MLB Urban Youth Academies has reached more than 10,000 young people.  Nearly 350 Academy student-athletes have gone on to participate in collegiate baseball and softball programs and almost 200 Academy student-athletes have been selected in the MLB First-Year Player Draft.  Two Academy graduates have been selected in the first round (Carlos Correa, the top overall selection in MLB’s 2012 Draft by the Houston Astros and the first Puerto Rico native ever chosen first overall, attended the Gurabo Academy; Aaron Hicks, the 14th overall pick in the first round of 2008 by the Minnesota Twins, attended the Compton Academy).  Three Academy graduates, all from the Compton Academy, appeared on Major League rosters over the past two seasons (Trayvon Robinson, currently of the Baltimore Orioles; Anthony Gose, Toronto Blue Jays; and Efren Navarro, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim).

As part of the Major League Baseball Urban Youth Initiative, all MLB Urban Youth Academies provide free, year-round baseball and softball instruction, as well as education programs. For more information, go to MLB.com/urbanyouthacademy.



Offline y04185

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #71 on: August 22, 2014, 02:29:02 PM »
oleschoolaggie, if my memory is correct, the strike zone was larger when Ted Williams hit .400.
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Offline oleschoolaggie

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #72 on: August 22, 2014, 02:52:39 PM »
oleschoolaggie, if my memory is correct, the strike zone was larger when Ted Williams hit .400.

i don't understand the logic that a reduced strike zone would lengthen ball games.  how so?  could anyone of ya'll elaborate on that?  imo, fewer pitches would be necessary with a reduced strike zone because the pitcher would have to throw strikes and if the pitcher throws strikes, the batter would be "foolish" not to swing.  my opinion is that the entire "strategy" of pitching would have to change with a reduced strike zone.

when you put the ball over the plate, guys are gonna swing.  basically a reduced strike zone means a pitcher must throw "strikes".  my philosophy is to make it easier to hit the ball and harder to strike somebody out.  managers then must assure that they have the best defense possible which would increase the value of guys who have a great glove...

Offline Maroon and Gray

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #73 on: August 22, 2014, 03:07:51 PM »
you have implied that a reduced strike zone would lead to more hitting, thus increased scoring.  Games that have more scoring last longer.  Then you would probably want to institute a 10 run rule or less OR reduce the innings of a complete game.

I just don't see what you've proposed as feasible.  Start up your version of baseball and see if it outdraws today's game.

oh, the strike zone while defined in today's game is still very much subjective to the home plate umpire.  You probably need technology to enforce a narrow strike that you propose.

Furthermore, a no-hitter is one of the great feats in baseball, and you want to try to eliminate it?  :no:
That in and of itself shows your lack of understanding of baseball.  Just turn the channel.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 03:13:28 PM by Maroon and Gray »

Offline MyTeVyKn

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Re: Can Baseball Win Back the African-American Community?
« Reply #74 on: August 22, 2014, 03:33:49 PM »
MyTeVyKn
thank you for that.  Unfortunately, you will never convince some of these people.  ::)
I'm watching a game right now on the MLB network.

Do you get that channel?  

You're welcome MG and Yes, I do.  Some folk just don't know that the work you have to put in really is hard work to play the game of baseball.  This is the very reason why Bo Jackson, "Neon Deon" Sanders, and to a lesser degree Michael Jordan were such phenomenal athletes when they played this game, football, and basketball on it's highest level.  I was really hoping that Russell Wilson would hang tough and join there ranks but its probably best that he didn't as he may not have wound up to be the QB that made history beating Peyton Manning for a SBC.

Anyway, the work ethic it takes to play this game is just like life.  As I mentioned earlier the rules, sizes, and dimensions keep changing.  So, you either put in the work to stay in the game or you turn to another sport with more glitter and glamour.  

You can pretty much say that about any sport.

I'm sorry, but to a certain extent, I have to disgree.  Yes, in all sports you have to work hard to maintain or improve your skill sets and yes, you have to do the same in life, if you want to improve, grow, and be successful.  But, I still think that in baseball, you have to work so much harder, think so much harder, do so much more, and put in so much more time and work.  In baskeball, there's only 5-basic fundamentals to the game (shooting, dribbling, passing, rebounding, and defense).  Once you get them down, then you practice them to get better.  Of course, the more you practice, the better you get at them.  With the exception of ages 6-9, the basket is at 10 ft. for life.  But as far as other distances, they are all the same for every age group/level.  Football, which only has 4-5 basic fundamentals (throwing/passing, receiving/catching, blocking, tackling, and kicking), these skills are pretty much mastered at the high school level.  Now, just like basketball.  In football, ages 5-8, field dimensions are 80-yards.  After that, 100-yards.  However, in baseball, there are 7-basic fundamentals i.e., hitting, fielding/defense, bunting, base running, pitching, catching, throwing.  Then on top of all that, you have the pitchers mound, bases, and outfield dimensions to be concerned about.  There are also varying distances in the outfield depending on the team you are playing.  Every teams outfield are not the same.  Each field you play on is unique.  There's nothing unique about the basketball court or football field regardless where you play.  As an outfielder, one of the first things I would do when I arrived at a different field was walk the outfield to study the distances from each of the bases, from the pitchers mound, and then to home plate.   I would survey for openings pending varied positions.  During warm-ups, I would measure the distances by throwing to each base and that would determine my strength and accuracy for the game.  As a hitter, during batting practice, I would check my swings to each field (LF, RF, CF) and where the gaps might be in the infield or occur during play.  Anyway, you don't have to take my word for it, here's a complete synopsis of some of the things that I have been trying to say.  See url below:

http://www.cottbus-graduates.com/dokumente/pdf/training/positions.pdf





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