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Author Topic: Retired NBA Player, Junior Bridgeman Built A $400 Million Fast Food Empire  (Read 1118 times)

Offline y04185

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Pop quiz #1: In 1975, which newly drafted player did the Lakers trade away to acquire superstar Kareem Abdul-Jabbar? If you guessed Junior Bridgeman, you are correct. Pop quiz #2: As of April 2014, who is the second largest owner of Wendy's franchises in America? Once again, the correct answer is… Junior Bridgeman. As an NBA player, Junior Bridgeman had a moderately successful 12-year career playing for the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Clippers. To be completely honest, his NBA career was kind of unremarkable. So why are we writing about him on Celebrity Net Worth? Well, as you may know, retirement can be a very painful experience for many NBA players. According to a study conducted by Sports Illustrated, a staggering 60% of NBA players are completely broke within five years of retiring. Junior Bridgeman did not go down this route. Instead, Junior Bridgeman is a shining light of inspiration. A man who every athlete should admire and study…

Ulysses Lee "Junior" Bridgeman was born on September 17, 1953 in East Chicago, Indiana. His father was a blue collar steel mill worker – a very common job in East Chicago during the era in which Junior Bridgeman grew up. He was a member of the undefeated (29-0) 1971 East Chicago Washington High School Senators basketball team that won the Indiana state high school basketball championship. His teammates included his brother Sam, Pete Trgovich, who went on to play at UCLA; and Tim Stoddard who would become a Major League Baseball pitcher.

At 6'5″ Bridgeman played guard and forward during college at the University of Louisville, where he was also a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity. After obtaining his bachelor's degree, Junior Bridgeman was drafted with the 8th overall pick in the first round of the 1975 NBA Draft by the Los Angeles Lakers, and, as mentioned, was then immediately traded to the Milwaukee Bucks for Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

In his 12-year NBA career (10 with Milwaukee, two with the Clippers), Bridgeman was mostly a sixth man. For nine consecutive seasons he averaged double figures in scoring. He holds the Milwaukee franchise record for number of games played at 711, though he only started in 105 of those games.

Bridgeman was a good basketball player, solid and steady. His professional career lasted from 1975 to 1987, in the era just before players were paid crazy amounts of money. Players like Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson made the bulk of their money from endorsement deals, but still made a lot of money in the NBA – close to $100 million for Jordan. Bridgeman never saw anywhere close to that kind of money during his NBA days. His peak salary was $350,000 from the Clippers in 1985.

Unlike most athletes, Junior was quick to realize that his window of time in the NBA would be relatively short. At some point the paychecks would stop coming in and he would need to find a new source of steady income. So, on a whim, Junior decided to purchase a franchise of his favorite fast food restaurant: Wendy's. While other NBA players hung out during the off season doing God knows what, Bridgeman was working in local Wendy's—learning his burgeoning business from every angle and building a foundation for the rest of his and his family's lives. By the time his playing days were over, Junior owned three Wendy's.
Fayetteville State by choice. Bronco by the Grace of GOD.

Offline Pirate12

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Great article Y. It must pain Bridgeman and other older former black athletes to see these multi-million dollar players squander their money clubbing and go bankrupt.  :tiptoe:

Offline Blue N Gold

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We need a lot more Junior Bridgemans around to spur on most of the other black athletes who end up squandering their funds with entourages and such. :clap: :bow: :clap:

Offline DES

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Great article Y. It must pain Bridgeman and other older former black athletes to see these multi-million dollar players squander their money clubbing and go bankrupt.  :tiptoe:

Is it from clubbing or is it bad investments?

Offline Blue N Gold

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Great article Y. It must pain Bridgeman and other older former black athletes to see these multi-million dollar players squander their money clubbing and go bankrupt.  :tiptoe:

Is it from clubbing or is it bad investments?
Probably both.

Offline DES

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Great article Y. It must pain Bridgeman and other older former black athletes to see these multi-million dollar players squander their money clubbing and go bankrupt.  :tiptoe:

Is it from clubbing or is it bad investments?
Probably both.

Right but folks always make it seem like folks go broke from clubbing when that actually is the minority for most players

Offline oleschoolaggie

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hey, even though he made a lot more money than bridgeman, magic johnson is a tremendous success story too.  not all nba players are stupid.  there are some examples out there of former nba players who made smart investments with their income and are now successful business men...

 

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