News: Registration requires "verification" before you are allowed to post.  Be sure to check your "spam" folder to make sure that you receive the verification link.  The e-mail should come from "Onnidan Fan Forum" with the return address -> staff@onnidan.com.

Author Topic: A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is...  (Read 85063 times)

Offline Bison66

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 23,036
  • Karma: +108/-27
  • Adinkra Symbol for "Unbreakable" "Resilient"
    • View Profile
    • CLANDESTINE - HONOR THY ANCESTOR
News to me (I was in high school up North) - or I forgot.

Anyone remember?


60 years later, ‘An Appeal for Human Rights’ still resonates



QUOTE

Sixty years have passed since Roslyn Pope came home from Europe to a segregated South and channeled her frustrations into writing “An Appeal for Human Rights.”

The document published on March 9, 1960, announced the formation of the Atlanta Student Movement, whose campaign of civil disobedience broke a suffocating stalemate over civil rights in Atlanta and hastened the end of racist Jim Crow laws and policies across the region.

After all this time, Pope is deeply concerned that their hard-won achievements are slipping away.

“We have to be careful. It’s not as if we can rest and think that all is well,” Pope told The Associated Press in an interview last week.

The “Appeal” quickly became a civil rights manifesto after it appeared as a full-page advertisement in Atlanta’s newspapers. It was denounced by Georgia’s segregationist Gov. Ernest Vandiver but celebrated around the country, reprinted for free in The New York Times and Los Angeles Times and entered into the Congressional Record.

The idea was to explain why black students would defy their parents, professors and police by illegally occupying whites-only spaces. It decried the racist laws governing education, jobs, housing, voting, hospitals, theaters, restaurants, and law enforcement. It called on “all people of good will to assert themselves and abolish these injustices.”

UNQUOTE
https://apnews.com/8e4896558c5907b8c2593755899ed07f?fbclid=IwAR2fU4P_UhofG10lbMdpj2B-9bopZxjn7P-r7QnIoOz5kDQO54QLYkTs3po

HBCU Shout Out:  SPELMAN COLLEGE!!!

O0   84,731
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 05:58:19 PM by Bison66 »

Offline lew9ball

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,323
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://TU
If you're not familiar with this woman's story, you'll be AMAZED!!

Mary Ellen Pleasant, the woman who became a millionaire and financed John Brown's attack in Harper's Ferry to the tune of $30,000 in 1800s money.

Wait until you see the THIRTY ROOM $2.4 million (in today's value) mansion she designed and built in San Francisco.



"I'd rather be a corpse than a coward," she wrote.


O0    81,728
Interesting article. Thanks for sharing Bison66 you always have some very interesting articles. I had never heard of Mrs Pleasant until reading this. :bow:
"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else"
                       Booker T. Washington

Offline lew9ball

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,323
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://TU
One of the myths purposely perpetrated by historians, churches and popular culture (a la 'Gone with the Wind,' - #ErraticTrump's favorite) was that Africans accepted enslavement in the U.S. and were - HILARIOUS! - docile.

The MANY laws to prevent uprisings and discourage escapes along with news reports of the period demonstrate the total and conniving dishonesty of that specious claim.

Daily sabotage, ads for 'runaways', destroyed crops, occasional poisonings, and enclaves of self-emancipating Africans (Maroons) in Dismal Swamp & the Everglades, and the "Underground Railroad" prove the truth: people want to be free and will take huge risks to escape bondage.

One of the lesser-known and quite large revolts by enslaved Africans took place in 1811 in Louisiana. No doubt it was inspired by the successful Haitian Revolution culminating in 1804. This video documents it.

LONG LIVE DESLONDES!!!!




O0   84,094
Great read thanks for sharing Bison66.. :clap: :clap:
"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else"
                       Booker T. Washington

Offline Bison66

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 23,036
  • Karma: +108/-27
  • Adinkra Symbol for "Unbreakable" "Resilient"
    • View Profile
    • CLANDESTINE - HONOR THY ANCESTOR
Many thanks, lew9ball!!!

BTW, how is your Family Heritage Research going?  Please update us in the thread you started (and let me know, please, 'cause I so rarely visit the General Forum...)

In regard to the German Coast rebellion, there's an additional factor I'd add to support my statement:
"No doubt it was inspired by the successful Haitian Revolution culminating in 1804."

Not only was it a mere 11 years later, but a bunch of French enslavers fled Haiti and went to Louisiana. Quite naturally because it was a former French colony and other French-speaking people were already there. Many of them brought their enslaved Africans with them.  This is one reason that Haitian Hoodoo (Voodoo, Voudum, etc.) was/is such a part of N'awlins culture.  Dr. John/ Dr. Jean was a sought-after practitioner and had a harem of wives, real estate and a huge French, Anglo as well as African/Black clientele.

So, Brother Deslondes, the leader of the German Coast Rebellion, probably came from Haiti.  He was, at a minimum, around a lot of Brothers and Sisters who knew in some detail about the exploits of Dessalines, Christophe, etc. and before them the earlier uprising initiated by Cécile Fatiman (a Voudun Priestess) and led by Dutty Boukman in 1791.

Thousands of French enslavers were killed in that rebellion.

   

https://atlantablackstar.com/2018/02/17/dutty-boukman-fearless-leader-helped-spark-haitian-revolution/
https://medium.com/@iloveblackpeopleapp/c%C3%A9cile-fatiman-eca3e52da19d

Long Live Fatiman, Boukman and Deslondes!!!
 :bow:   :clap:   :bow:   :clap:

O0  84,754

Offline lew9ball

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,323
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • http://TU
^^^Thanks Bison66 for your concern in my family research. No new recent development since last reporting. However a reunion was planned for Atlanta this year 2020 but cancel due to virus outbreak. Our family had a virtual reunion instead which went quite well.
Looking forward to the sharing of your valuable knowledge on this board. :clap: :clap:
"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else"
                       Booker T. Washington

Offline Bison66

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 23,036
  • Karma: +108/-27
  • Adinkra Symbol for "Unbreakable" "Resilient"
    • View Profile
    • CLANDESTINE - HONOR THY ANCESTOR
lew9ball,

Thanks!

I just noticed your post re: the article on Mrs. Pleasant.
That was something, wasn't it??

Bro, that's great news re: the family reunion.  FANTASTIC!!!!

I just realized I have some Family Heritage Research NEWS - augmented by DNA testing - to share!!!!  Found more cousins!!!!!

(Now, I just have to find your thread!!!  -smile - )


O0

Offline Bison66

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 23,036
  • Karma: +108/-27
  • Adinkra Symbol for "Unbreakable" "Resilient"
    • View Profile
    • CLANDESTINE - HONOR THY ANCESTOR
Digest and enjoy this dynamite Sister's take on Black military veterans.

Gives you a whole 'nother perspective in the wake of Memorial Day...



QUOTE

In a bold departure from previous scholarship, Le’Trice D. Donaldson locates the often overlooked era between the Civil War and the end of World War I as the beginning of Black soldiers’ involvement in the long struggle for civil rights. Donaldson traces the evolution of these soldiers as they used their military service to challenge white notions of an African American second-class citizenry and forged a new identity as freedom fighters willing to demand the rights of full citizenship and manhood.

Through extensive research, Donaldson not only illuminates this evolution but also interrogates the association between masculinity and citizenship and the ways in which performing manhood through military service influenced how these men struggled for racial uplift. Following the Buffalo soldier units and two regular army infantry units from the frontier and the Mexican border to Mexico, Cuba, and the Philippines, Donaldson investigates how these locations and the wars therein provide windows into how the soldiers’ struggles influenced Black life and status within the United States.

Continuing to probe the idea of what it meant to be a military race man—a man concerned with the uplift of the Black race who followed the philosophy of progress—Donaldson contrasts the histories of officers Henry Flipper and Charles Young, two soldiers who saw their roles and responsibilities as Black military officers very differently.

Duty beyond the Battlefield demonstrates that from the 1870s to 1920s military race men laid the foundation for the “New Negro” movement and the rise of Black Nationalism that influenced the future leaders of the twentieth century Civil Rights movement.


UNQUOTE

https://www.aaihs.org/duty-beyond-the-battlefield-a-new-book-about-black-soldiers-role-in-shaping-early-civil-rights/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=duty-beyond-the-battlefield-a-new-book-about-black-soldiers-role-in-shaping-early-civil-rights

BOOM!!

My grandfather John W. Reddick was one of these men.  After serving in the Spanish American War in the Philippines as a Sharpshooter, he returned to Franklin, TN.  He became a community leader, a Mason, and State Grand Master of two different African/Black self help groups.
 
He was a strong advocate for education for Black youth and more than a decade after his 1941 death, a street and a housing complex were named for him.

In 2017, my family attended the unveiling of a historical marker about Papa.  He was son of an ex-enslaved woman and an ex-con.  He was a baaaaaaaad man.

My Mom told me he didn't take no stuff off of white folks and one of the stories she told me about him (and a shotgun) is included in our historical novel, CLANDESTINE.


O0    84,973
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 01:12:20 AM by Bison66 »

Offline Bison66

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 23,036
  • Karma: +108/-27
  • Adinkra Symbol for "Unbreakable" "Resilient"
    • View Profile
    • CLANDESTINE - HONOR THY ANCESTOR

The Forgotten Story of How 13 Black Men Broke the Navy’s Toughest Color Barrier

During World War II, a group of African American sailors was chosen to integrate the Naval Officer Corps, forever changing what was possible in the U.S. Navy



ONE EXCERPT

Once, the officer candidates were lined up for a medical exam. “All right, you boys, strip down,” someone yelled. “Everything off. Strip down.” “Stand over there,” came another order. “Stand at attention.”

Arbor had white splotches on the skin near the top of his penis. A white pharmacist’s mate grabbed a 36-inch ruler and yelled out, “Look at this, look at this. Here’s this Negro here. Look at this man, half white and half black.” As he spoke, he rapped Arbor’s penis with the ruler, causing him to wince with each whack.

His comrades were certain a riot was about to start. This was it. This was the moment they would surely be kicked out.

“Hey, boy, where did you get this thing from?” the pharmacist’s mate asked, still whacking Arbor’s penis.
Arbor looked him directly in the eye, just the way the Navy had taught.

“Well, you see, sir, I was raised in a white neighborhood.”

Nothing more than a snicker escaped his peers’ lips, and the white men, furious that they could not get a rise out of the officer candidates, stormed off.

Their restraint was not an accident. These men had been winnowed from hundreds of potential candidates, chosen because the Navy deemed them not too extreme in their attitudes. Like Jackie Robinson, who would break baseball’s color barrier three years later, these men were chosen because they were expected to suffer these indignities quietly and gracefully.
https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/05/25/thirteen-black-men-navy-color-barrier-271084

O0  85,004

 

Onnidan's HBCUSports Logo
News

 

Support Our Efforts

Support our efforts

With all the divisive rhetoric on social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter, websites such as ours, especially message boards, are under the watchful eye of the Internet giants. And those giants are coming down hard on sites like this one due to the perception of the need for better "oversight".

We recognize the cultural conflict that exists and over the past few months we've been accused of allowing content in posts/threads that supposedly violates some advertiser's policies. Those threads weren’t an issue in the past, but for some reason, they are an issue now. And we are being penalized (financially) because of it.

 

As a result we are coming to you directly for your financial support>

 

Please consider supporting our efforts to foster free and open discussion of current issues as they relate to the topics you are interested in. You can use the Cash App and contribute to $onnidan, or process your donation through PayPal below.

=OW= 


 

 

Powered by EzPortal