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Author Topic: A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is...  (Read 88941 times)

Offline Bison66

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African Americans and Africa: A New Book about Black America’s Relationship with the Continent
by Nemata Blyden
(She is related to the much-accomplished Edward Wilmot Blyden, a staunch & pioneering Pan-Africanist.)



QUOTE

Nemata Blyden: I suppose the creation story for this book is simply my personal history. Being born to an “African American” mother and an “African” father (a more complex story readers will discover), made it inevitable that I would be interested in this subject. As a child I interacted with my Black American and Sierra Leonean relatives, coming to understand the history of both places. Although I am American born, my formative years were spent on the continent. My adult life has been shaped by living in a country with a complicated racial history. I moved to this country as an 18 year old with the sensibilities of an immigrant, having to learn elements of American culture. I came to understand America’s racial hierarchy and its norms, and experienced racism of the kind that exists only in this country.

In college I noticed the so-called divide between “Africans” and “African Americans,” while easily straddling both communities. This allowed me to understand the major differences between them, and to recognize that their historical experiences, while comparable in some respects, were radically different in others. From my vantage point, I also saw similarities that neither group would have recognized in each other.

However, the impetus for the book came from an incident in Texas many years ago. It was around 1994 that a Black family in Plano, Texas woke to find “Go Back to Africa” spray-painted on their garage. I remember wondering, “Where in Africa are they expected to go?” — this family whose ancestors might have been enslaved centuries ago, and whose blood and sweat had built this nation? Where was this family, that had earned the right to call itself American, to go? In my bid to answer these questions, I set about exploring the history of Black Americans, trying to understand how Africa figured in their understanding of their relationship to the United States. In 1996 I designed and taught a course, African Americans and Africa: Links in History. I suppose I finally wrote this book as a text for that class, but realize now how timely a topic it is. We are arguably in a moment when Black people are facing challenges to their right to belong. African Americans have a long, tangled, and sometimes problematic relationship with the United States, which over the centuries has bound them in various ways to Africa. The book explores the ebbs and flows of that relationship.
UNQUOTE

https://www.aaihs.org/african-americans-and-africa-a-new-book-about-black-americans-relationship-with-the-continent/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=african-americans-and-africa-a-new-book-about-black-americans-relationship-with-the-continent

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Offline Bison66

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Here is Edward Wilmont Blyden and his wife, Amelia, who is the mother of the article's author cited above.


And here is the author, Nemata Blyden, a professor at George Washington University in DC.


QUOTE

Nemata, author of “African Americans and Africa: A New History,” told the gathering at the Alexandria Black History Museum that she saw the divisions between African-American and Continental African students at her university, but she also saw the similarities and differences. However, it was the stereotypes, she says, “that was a little bit of a shock.”

The relationship between Blacks raised in the US and those raised in Africa has historically had its “ebbs and flows,” she says, often depending upon what is happening socially and politically in the United States. The relationship has had less to do with Africa,” she affirmed. 

She recalled how the naming of Black institutions reflected those ebbs and flows, such as the naming of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1816 and the National Association of Colored People in 1909, as many Blacks deflected from Africa and tried melting down into the American melting pot.
UNQUOTE

https://portofharlem.net/snippets19/nov062019-nemata-blyden.html


A partial list of...


Publications
"(Re)envisioning the African Diaspora: Historical Memory and Cross-fertilization." In Post-Colonial Sierra Leone in Paradoxes of History and Memory in Post-Colonial Sierra Leone, ed. Sylvia Ojukutu-Macauley and Ismail Rashid, 59-76. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2013.

"Back to Africa: Sierra Leone, 1787-1897" and "Early Black Identities" In Back to Africa, Vol. II: The Ideology and Practice of the African Returnee Phenomenon from the Caribbean and North America ((CASAS BOOK SERIES NO. 92), ed. Kwesi Kwaa Prah, 49-59 and 173-187. Cape Town: The Centre for Advanced Studies of African Society, 2012.

"Relationships among Blacks in the Diaspora: African and Caribbean Immigrants and American-Born Blacks." In Africans in Global Migration: Searching for Promised Lands, ed. John A. Arthur, Joseph Takougang, and Thomas Owusu, 161-174. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012.

“A Perspective of the African Diaspora in the United States.” In The African Diaspora in the United States and Canada at the Dawn of the 21st Century, ed. John W. Frazier et. al., 93-105. Binghamton, NY: SUNY Press, 2009.  Co-authored with F. Akiwumi.

https://history.columbian.gwu.edu/nemata-blyden

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Offline Bison66

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Slavery in California....

QUOTE

When Mormon slaveholders crossed the border into California, they entered a free state. California’s Constitution of 1850 outlawed slavery, but its Legislature and courts, dominated by migrants from the South, defended coercive labor practices in the state. Well into the 1850s, the slaveholders of San Bernardino operated openly, free from legal interference.

To supplement their African American workforce, Mormons purchased and “adopted” Indian children. By the early 1850s, both California and Utah had legalized Native American servitude. “An Act for the Relief of Indian Slaves and Prisoners” allowed Utah’s white residents to keep Native children in their households for up to 20 years. Those children were generally required to work to pay back the price of their own purchase. Through a similar law, white Californians secured Indian minors as domestic wards.

African Americans and Native Americans occupied the lowest rungs of a strict social and political hierarchy in San Bernardino. According to LDS custom, church leaders exercised a monopoly on religious and civil offices alike. All San Bernardino County officials were Mormons.
[...]
One former Smith slave, Biddy Mason, moved to L.A., where she became a nurse, a real estate investor, a religious leader and a philanthropist. She tended to prisoners and orphans, funded L.A.’s first elementary school for black children and co-founded its first African American church. As the city boomed in the late 19th century, so too did her fortune. When she died in 1891, Mason was worth an estimated $300,000 (roughly $8.5 million today). In many ways, her remarkable life mirrored the shift in opportunity and wealth from San Bernardino to Los Angeles.
UNQUOTE

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-01-19/san-bernardino-mormon-slavery


We have previously discussed Ms. Biddy Mason in this thread.


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Offline Bison66

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"Uncle Tom" WAS NO UNCLE TOM!!!!

Here is the ACTUAL character from the book, Uncle Tom's Cabin...


QUOTE from a review

“Stowe’s melodramatic story humanized the suffering of slavery for white audiences by portraying Tom as a Jesus-like figure who is ultimately martyred, beaten to death by a cruel master because he refuses to betray the whereabouts of two women who had escaped from slavery.”

UNQUOTE

https://urbanintellectuals.com/uncle-tom-man-refused-beat-black-women/?fbclid=IwAR04akZFp16KU4zH82Fyv7PUJ_uVWdfFo5muC2V6yCGrYDjw-d0hJUNLpYY

QUOTE

DID YOU KNOW?

Most Black folks have heard or used the term Uncle tom when we refer to a sell-out, or someone we feel is tap dancing for the attention and acceptance of other races. It has always been used in a derogatory manner to infer that this was the type of person who cozied up to his slave master, but did you know that the inference and analogy is totally wrong?

Uncle Tom was a man who refused to beat black women.
Uncle Tom was a man who refused to tell on other slaves.
Uncle tom was a man who would put cotton in other slaves’ bags at night, so that they wouldn’t get beat!
Uncle Tom was a man who helped 100 slaves get free long before the underground railroad.
Uncle Tom was a man, that once free, established the 1st Laborers school for other fugitive slaves!

UNQUOTE

I will take a moment here to point out that this has NOTHING to do with the Black Conservative FANTASY that Olds..t long ago posted here (or on MEACFans) about a man who was sought out by enslaved Africans from other plantations, etc.

In addition, some believe that Stowe based her character on real man who was more "militant" than the man she portrayed.



QUOTE
Josiah Henson was an author, abolitionist, and minister. Born into slavery, in Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland, he escaped to Upper Canada in 1830, and founded a settlement and laborer’s school for other fugitive slaves at Dawn, near Dresden, in Kent County, Upper Canada, of British Canada.
UNQUOTE

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Offline Bison66

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QUOTE

Eartha Mary Magdalene White was a humanitarian and philanthropist.


A lifelong resident of Jacksonville, Florida, White amassed her fortunes through serial entrepreneurship in real estate, laundry, dry goods, taxis, and more. Along with her adopted mother, Clara (also pictured), she provided for the hungry and homeless and also built the first public school for black students in nearby Bayard, Florida.
https://www.upworthy.com/17-stunning-photos-of-black-victorians-show-how-history-really-looked?fbclid=IwAR19eA1NQVzcK_7tIGS1OwMoSioAOZOoRRjoyFq9HTtqo4EHEyluDjhuaLY

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Offline Bison66

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The Untold History of Lynching in the American West
In the aftermath of the Mexican-American War, people of Mexican ancestry were the target of intense racist violence.


QU0TE
The plague of lynchings of Mexican-Americans in the American West has long been excluded from history books. For the Journal of Social History, historians William D. Carrigan and Clive Webb analyzed hundreds of such extrajudicial killings that occurred between 1848 and 1928. They write:

Although widely recognized in the Mexican community on both sides of the border, and among some scholars, the story of mob violence against Mexicans remains relatively unknown to the wider public.

Defining lynching as “a retributive act of murder for which those responsible claim to be serving the interests of justice, tradition, or community good,” Carrigan and Webb catalogued 597 lynchings of persons of Mexican origin or descent in the United States. They stress that this is a conservative estimate. “It is obviously true that no amount of historical research will ever reveal every single lynching victim—no matter their race and ethnicity—that is anywhere near the actual number of victims.”

In 1877, the murder of a white man was “avenged” by the random slaughter of as many as 40 people in Nueces County, Texas.
UNQUOTE
https://daily.jstor.org/the-untold-history-of-lynching-in-the-american-west/?fbclid=IwAR35QPiaPyx4Z08cyUZXAoEJf8eUKuwVqMPN-6QpW1fVBrgNlWbVraTCiRM

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Offline Bison66

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Busting some myths about Rosa Parks,..from her niece.

Rosa Parks Was My Aunt. It's Time to Set the Record Straight



QUOTE
This is how you know her: She was the tired seamstress who refused to give up her seat, sparking the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955. Maybe you remember Rosa Parks as that quiet, older woman being honored at an awards show. Or maybe you remember seeing pictures of her shaking a President’s hand. But at this year’s Golden Globes, when Oprah Winfrey talked about Recy Taylor, a woman from Alabama who was kidnapped and raped by six white men, Oprah also did some myth-busting about my aunt with these words: "Her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case and together they sought justice."
UNQUOTE
https://www.shondaland.com/inspire/a16022001/rosa-parks-was-my-aunt/?fbclid=IwAR2r-7FOoY1paXRaXIHqRipdc4CEAaSJebBKrCzBilLR4MVnYl24q3Yzj7Q

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Offline Bison66

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I am pleased to present in this thread (also) a full REFUTATION of the bullshyt posted by Neymar about West Africans not having "the stuff" it takes to develop writing.

This summary video (link below) from Atlanta Black Star NOT ONLY gives examples of scripts developed by Africans in the west of the Continent. It also shows those scripts were developed hundreds of years before one in Ethiopia.  Are we to conclude that the Ethiopians didn't have "the stuff" until much later?  Of course not!

That would be ridiculous!!  As ridiculous as Neymar saying he has posted pro-Black info (then NOT being able to give an example) but having posted - in another language he thought would not be understood - that "Bantus are my born enemy."

https://atlantablackstar.com/2016/11/23/11-ancient-african-writing-systems-you-should-know/

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Offline Bison66

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The Slaughter And Near Genocide Of The Tasmanian People By The British

QUOTE
The aborigines of Tasmania did not just sit back and watch the invaders destroy them. They put up a strong resistance. But we fear their resistance was not enough. Because if it was, they would still be around till today. But no one of that nation remains today.

In their usual manner, the British declared war on the Tasmanian aborigines, and named the genocide “The Black War of Van Dieman’s Land”. This lasted for 27 years, between 1803 and 1830. And in those evil years, the Black population of Tasmania was reduced from over 5,000 to less than 75 people.

To elevate the genocide, two years before the end of the so-called war, the British government declared martial law in 1828 and gave the white in Tasmania authority to kill the Black people on sight. This was the last resistance for the aborigines. They defended themselves and their land with clubs, spears, arrows, and other sundry weapons. But their weapons were not enough to match for the guns, and firepower of the British.

UNQUOTE

https://libertywritersafrica.com/how-british-eliminated-almost-the-entire-aborigine-tasmanian-population-of-australia-in-1800s/?amp&fbclid=IwAR0abT_E0ZktSYKkuBcZIxqpMCs6xc0BE87WWM6NccuKjJC64W2uQcMpxF0

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Offline Bison66

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Tomorrow is the 60th Anniversary of the Student Sit-Ins Begun by Students and North Carolina A&T!!



QUOTE

The brave freshmen from NCA&T, who would later be adorned with the iconic label of the “Greensboro Four”, consisted of David Richmond, Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil, and Ezell Blair Jr. (Jibreel Khazan). On February 1, 1960, the Greensboro Four bought items at Woolworth’s, then sat at the ‘whites-only’ lunch counter and refused to leave until they were served. Although waitresses refused to serve them, in accordance with the store’s racist policies, the four would continue their protest and in the following days and weeks would be joined by more students from NCA&T, the nearby all-women’s HBCU Bennett College and students from other nearby colleges and high schools.

In a 2003 interview, Khazan (formerly Blair, Jr.) reflected on the daily threats of violence and verbal assaults from white antagonists, as one caller reached him on the dorm hall phone and bellowed, “…executioners are going to kill you n-----s if you come back down here tomorrow, you and your crazy friends.”
UNQUOTE

https://blackpressusa.com/60-years-ago-students-launched-sit-in-movement/?fbclid=IwAR1sIYsFI_faCsjTXe15C4JvvHmvOmiC8OusluXi3gL43yRmUDgrZTjvtRA

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Offline Bison66

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2020 is the Centennial of the Start of the "Harlem Renaissance"

Short video - interview with Harlem historican John Reddick (same name as my granddad)

https://newyork.cbslocal.com/video/4428477-New-York-Readies-To-Celebrate-Centennial-Anniversary-Of-The-Harlem-Renaissance/

I grew up in NYC and my Dad lived in NYC during the Renaissance (part of the time in Harlem), so I was vaguely familiar with the Renaissance. My favorite poet as a high schooler was Langston Hughes and I read everything by him I could put my hands on.

But I am curious if those of you who grew up in other parts of the country became familiar with the various writers and musicians who were part of the Renaissance:
- in school
- in college
- from parents / grandparents
- oral tradition in the neighborhood
- church programs

Please share your experiences.


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Offline Bison66

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QUOTE

Rev. Tunis Campbell, abolitionsist, orator, militia commander


 
As a justice of the peace, minister, and political boss, Campbell organized a black power structure in McIntosh County that protected freed people from white abuses, whether against their bodies or in labor negotiations. He headed a 300-strong African American militia that guarded him from reprisals by the Ku Klux Klan or others, even though his home was burned, he was poisoned, and his family lived in constant fear.
http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/tunis-campbell-1812-1891

400 person militia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunis_Campbell

And,....You might have guessed: Rev Tunis Campbell (A.M.E.) is in our book, CLANDESTINE.

www.Clandestine-Life.com/shop



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Offline Bison66

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This excellent article, among other things, highlights the changes in the priorities of the Republican Party since its founding in the 1800s.  It is essentially a history lesson masquerading as a book review - which is fine.



Be sure to also scroll down and read the excerpt from the book about "A Death in Georgia."
Spoiler Alert:  You'll need a strong stomach.


The Supreme Court's Failure To Protect Blacks' Rights

QUOTE
"What the radical Republicans wanted, led by Charles Sumner in the Senate and Thaddeus Stevens in the House, was probably the largest experiment in social engineering ever taken," says constitutional scholar Lawrence Goldstone. "They wanted the federal government to take these four million newly freed slaves and integrate them fully into society virtually immediately."

But that didn't happen — and wouldn't for decades — in part because of decisions handed down by the Supreme Court, which declared the Civil Rights Act of 1875 unconstitutional in 1883. The court also said Congress lacked the constitutional authority under the 14th Amendment to grant equal protections under the law to blacks, stating that only states and local governments could do that. It also passed a ruling stating that the Enforcement Act of 1871, which forbade meetings of Ku Klux Klan members, was unconstitutional.
UNQUOTE

https://www.npr.org/2011/02/24/133960082/the-supreme-courts-failure-to-protect-civil-rights?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&fbclid=IwAR3LCXxAIYT2zpaGOS3wowu2z49mfuB-jjdK_PNsxPwtTG6mhBu9UsAY6gU

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« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 11:41:24 PM by Bison66 »

Offline Bison66

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How the GI Bill's Promise Was Denied to a Million Black WWII Veterans



EXCERPT:

A White Post-War Housing Boom—And Redlining in Black Neighborhoods

The postwar housing boom almost entirely excluded black Americans, most of whom remained in cities that received less and less investment from businesses and banks.

Though the GI Bill guaranteed low-interest mortgages and other loans, they were not administered by the VA itself. Thus, the VA could cosign, but not actually guarantee the loans. This gave white-run financial institutions free reign to refuse mortgages and loans to black people.

Redlining—a decades-old practice of marking maps by race to characterize the risks of lending money and providing insurance—made purchasing a home even more difficult for black veterans. Lenders froze out poorer neighborhoods, ensuring that loan assistance and insurance would be denied. And new white suburbs often came with overtly racist covenants that denied entry to black people.

In 1947, only 2 of the more than 3,200 VA-guaranteed home loans in 13 Mississippi cities went to black borrowers. “These impediments were not confined to the South,” notes historian Ira Katznelson. “In New York and the northern New Jersey suburbs, fewer than 100 of the 67,000 mortgages insured by the GI bill supported home purchases by non-whites.”
UNQUOTE
https://www.history.com/news/gi-bill-black-wwii-veterans-benefits?fbclid=IwAR0MlkWYcdOkqqk4KJF11kbzNqYARwmchmV7-JI6cNd_ruhCgt6zyiBUl18

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Offline Bison66

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Story of Ghanaian Slave Woman Who Led the Biggest Slave Revolt in The West Indies In 1733

QUOTE

She planned the rebellion with another slave called Christian. Both of them who were royalty from Ghana was able to plot the revolt and then gather over 150 of their enslaved kin to join them in taking over the West Indies.
After they had all rehearsed and concluded their plans, they struck on the 23rd of November, 1733. That day, they first went about their normal chores. But their masters and overseers did not realize that they had hidden knives in the woods that they usually delivered to the fort at Coral Bay.

After they had successfully entered Fort Fredericksvaern without any suspicions, the slaves killed a great number of the soldiers in the fort. The fight was brutal, as the slaves killed all soldiers on the ground, except for one, John Gabriel, who managed to escape. After he escaped, he ran off to alert the Danish officials, but it was too late. The slaves took over the fort and fired the cannon in the fort to signal their takeover to the others who were waiting.
Breffu and the others were waiting for the signal in the plantations. Once they heard the cannon fired, they began the second phase of their attack. Breffu, accompanied by Christian charged into the home of her master, Pieter Krøyer, and killed him and his wife. While they were at it, the other slaves stormed the weapons houses and seized weapons, guns and gun powder.

Breffu and her army of rebels also killed three members of the Van Stell family, who were one of the wealthiest families on the Island. Wealth made from the blood, tears, and sweat of the African slaves.

UNQUOTE
Be careful, y'all, their website has been hacked. Many/most of the links take you to "kiddie porn." I have written to them to alert them that their site has been hacked.
https://libertywritersafrica.com/story-of-ghanaian-slave-woman-who-led-the-biggest-slave-revolt-in-the-west-indies-in-1733/?fbclid=IwAR1nr-8SiCP8I0lveHQd-esCwPUylNueLeKT-h0Wety5Ab1lGlWrRH48MCk

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« Last Edit: February 18, 2020, 12:43:38 AM by Bison66 »

 

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