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Author Topic: A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is...  (Read 66896 times)

Offline Bison66

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https://youtu.be/gKWMT6JlL7k?t=1260]https://youtu.be/gKWMT6JlL7k?t=1260]https://youtu.be/gKWMT6JlL7k?t=1260

An interesting conversation about Drs. John Henrik Clarke and Cheikh Anta Diop.

Skip to about the 13-minute mark for the meat of the conversation, altho the first part is also quite interesting..

https://imixwhatilike.org/2016/04/04/living-genealogies-of-africana-studies-with-dr-greg-carr/

Triple HBCU SHOUT OUT:  Tennessee State University, Morgan State University and Howard University.

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« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 11:07:36 PM by Bison66 »
Long Live Killmonger!

Offline Bison66

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Anybody here remember the TV show, SOUL!...???

https://drumsintheglobalvillage.com/tag/melissa-haizlip/

Includes a 1972 interview of Farrakhan.  Looking like a teenager!!

Nikki Giovanni interviews James Baldwin!!!!

And a book about the show..



O0
Long Live Killmonger!

Offline Bison66

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RE:
FYI and FTR

https://onnidan1.com/forum/index.php?topic=28627.msg1072784#msg1072784

O0

Pretty good video on Black soldiers (African Descent) in the Civil War and Blacks who supposedly "fought" for the south.



Also mentions the white Draft Riots in NYC, in which random Africans/Blacks were shot, beaten to death and lynched.  The riot happened at the same time the Massachusetts 54th USCT were fighting at Fort Wagner, suffering 50% casualties.


And here is a first hand report of the little-known battle at Milliken's Bend, in which the AFRICAN BRIGADE - only trained for two weeks and although vastly outnumbered - displayed courage and discipline.

https://www.civilwarmonitor.com/blogs/black-soldiers-and-the-bloody-battle-of-millikens-bend

Our Ancestors were Africans when they were captured and brought to Turtle Island (the Americas). 

Our Ancestors were still Africans when we fought on both sides of the 1776 rebellion and fought with Native tribes in the French and Indian Wars. 

Our Ancestors were Africans when they fought in the Seminole Wars and the US Civil War.

We were Africans then; we are still Africans now - even if for some of us, our family's been spotted up along the way.  Citizenship (even of the 2nd class variety in the US, Canada, the Islands, Central & South America) and identity are two very different things.


O0  66,636
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 09:38:40 PM by Bison66 »
Long Live Killmonger!

Offline Bison66

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Y'all,
This one is truly from the heart.  I've just discovered this book. Gotta get it!

On the previous page, there is a post regarding the radical sharecroppers union in Alabama.  Also on that page is a review of a book that I asserted was a jewel in itself.

Here is another book review of that kind about an obviously outstanding book - award-winning, in fact - about an illiterate African/Black sharecropper in Alabama - MISTER Ned Cobb (1885-1973).

THIS IS THE KIND OF MAN EACH OF US WISHES WE HAD KNOWN PERSONALLY.


Excerpts from the WONDERFUL review:

The book has its share of drama. We read about Cobb’s joining the radical union, about getting into a shootout with police while protecting a friend’s property from a fraudulent foreclosure, about his 12-year prison stint. But, in general, it moves gently; it’s more a stream than a river.
[...]
“All God’s Dangers” also happens to be a dense catalog of the ways that whites tricked and mistreated blacks in the first half of the 20th century. “Years ago I heard that Abraham Lincoln freed the colored people,” Mr. Cobb says early on, “but it didn’t amount to a hill of beans.” About his white neighbors, he declares, “Any way they could deprive a Negro was a celebration to ’em.”
[...]
Perhaps the best thing about “All God’s Dangers” is that it is so direct about the injustices piled upon Mr. Cobb’s family and other blacks in Alabama, while remaining so buoyant. Mr. Cobb had an unshakable sense of moral justice, but he did not want his heart to curdle with bitterness. “Good God, there wasn’t but few privileges that we was allowed,” he remarks. Yet he always had “big eyes and high hopes.” He becomes one of the first black farmers in Alabama to own a car.

UNQUOTE
https://knewzfrommeroewest.blogspot.com/2014/04/lost-in-literary-history-tale-of.html#comment-form
The original review was in the New York Times in 2014: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/19/books/all-gods-dangers-a-forgotten-autobiography.html?smid=tw-share

Seriously, is ANYONE not moved after reading the review at that link?!?

LONG LIVE MR. NED COBB!!!

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« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 10:07:32 PM by Bison66 »
Long Live Killmonger!

Offline Bison66

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I predict that most Americans would learn more about the truth of American History in this documentary (limited to the early 1900s) that they did in all their courses in high school and perhaps college, too.



Check it out!  Includes references to Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Spanish-American War, the Boer War in Azania (S. Africa), the introduction of electricity, the Panama Canal and MUCH, MUCH more.

Executive Producers are:  Malik Ali and Waleed Ali.  NO WONDER THERE IS MORE TRUTH IN IT THAN I WOULD HAVE EVER EXPECTED!!!

O0  66,728
« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 01:13:15 PM by Bison66 »
Long Live Killmonger!

Offline Neymar

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Anybody here remember the TV show, SOUL!...???

https://drumsintheglobalvillage.com/tag/melissa-haizlip/

Includes a 1972 interview of Farrakhan.  Looking like a teenager!!

Nikki Giovanni interviews James Baldwin!!!!

And a book about the show..



O0

Very cool.

Thanks for posting :clap:


أشد الفاقة عدم العقل

Offline oldsport

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Anybody here remember the TV show, SOUL!...???

https://drumsintheglobalvillage.com/tag/melissa-haizlip/

Includes a 1972 interview of Farrakhan.  Looking like a teenager!!

Nikki Giovanni interviews James Baldwin!!!!

And a book about the show..



O0

Very cool.



Thanks for posting :clap:

We had some really confused people.

Offline Bison66

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Anybody here remember the TV show, SOUL!...???

https://drumsintheglobalvillage.com/tag/melissa-haizlip/

Includes a 1972 interview of Farrakhan.  Looking like a teenager!!

Nikki Giovanni interviews James Baldwin!!!!

And a book about the show..



O0

Very cool.

Thanks for posting :clap:

My pleasure.

O0
Long Live Killmonger!

Offline Bison66

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Anybody here remember the TV show, SOUL!...???

https://drumsintheglobalvillage.com/tag/melissa-haizlip/

Includes a 1972 interview of Farrakhan.  Looking like a teenager!!

Nikki Giovanni interviews James Baldwin!!!!

And a book about the show..



O0

Very cool.



Thanks for posting :clap:

We had some really confused people.

Please don't tell me YOU are calling Giovanni or Baldwin, "confused."

O0
Long Live Killmonger!

Offline Bison66

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A Rebellious Take on African-American History

Marcus Garvey and the UNIA
QUOTE

I also suggest that the resistance to such an interpretive move [of the UNIA] reflects both a shared investment among writers and historians—then and now, Southern and Northern, black and white—in denying slave rebellion and a deep reluctance to imagine slaves as political actors in their own right.

That returns us to the problem I opened with: Why the Garvey movement has remained largely hidden from us and what a serious investigation of it might reveal. A third and final reassessment of history making and history writing thereby begins with a geographical and social profile of the movement based on material in the published Garvey papers (edited by Robert A. Hill) and in the Negro World, the UNIA newspaper. Historians have widely assumed (based on relatively little evidence) that the UNIA was a movement of the urban North, chiefly attracting recent migrants from the West Indies together with impoverished African-Americans who suffered from a variety of dislocations. But I discovered that most of the association's divisions were in the Southern states, not in the North, and in small towns and rural areas rather than in large cities; that UNIA supporters, whether in the North, South, or West, were overwhelmingly Southern born (and not from the Caribbean); and that they were working people who were literate, had skills, were married, were living in families, and were generally in their 30s and 40s. In short, laboring folks who sought or had achieved some measure of stability and respectability.

Such African-Americans were drawn to Garveyism in great numbers because Garvey spoke a language with familiar ideas and cadences, and because the UNIA tapped into deep wells of experience and sensibility traceable to enslavement and seen in many of the struggles of the postemancipation period, especially those that focused on issues of community empowerment, self-governance, and separatism: emigrationism, the establishment of black towns, the practice of "fusion" politics (local power-sharing arrangements with white people), the development of unincorporated black settlements on the edges of plantations and towns. Garvey presented an argument and set of projects—first and foremost, retaking their African homeland from European colonizers—that took the sobering of black prospects in the depth of the Jim Crow era and offered a breathtaking vision of political struggle and redemption. The UNIA, in turn, built on traditions of fraternalism, grass-roots politics, and religious enthusiasm.


A follower of Marcus Garvey, founder of the Universal Negro Improvement Association,
waits outside a UNIA club in New York in 1943.


Moreover, the UNIA may be seen as part of a larger (and still to be excavated) black political underground that evinced a hybridity of politics and political ideas and that established important bridges between the mobilizations of the 1920s and 1930s and those of the 1950s and 1960s. A number of individuals either moved between the UNIA and organizations like the NAACP without cutting ties with either, or moved on from the UNIA to the NAACP, the Southern Tenant Farmers' Union, the Nation of Islam, the Communist Party, or a variety of more localized projects. Garveyite influences can also be seen on figures like E.D. Nixon, the organizer of the Montgomery bus boycott, Malcolm X, Bob Moses, and Kwame Nkrumah, the president of Ghana. Nixon had been in the UNIA; Malcolm X's father was a prominent Garveyite; Moses' grandfather was a UNIA supporter; and Nkrumah was deeply influenced by Garvey's ideas when he was educated in the United States.

This political world has remained hidden from us in good part because scholars have not taken the political history seriously. How come? To some extent, the hostility of admired and consequential black intellectuals and activists, like W.E.B. Du Bois, who regarded Garvey as a rival and interloper, has served to discredit him and the UNIA.

UNQUOTE
https://www.chronicle.com/article/On-History-A-Rebellious-Take/47497/

It is beyond time to take good and serious look at the most successful and largest non-church multi-national African/Black organization in the 20th Century and perhaps in history.

I recommend RACE FIRST by Dr. Tony Martin.


https://www.amazon.com/Race-First-Ideological-Organizational-Improvement/dp/0912469234

The late Dr. Tony Martin speaks after the introduction by my Howard classmate, Atty Alton Maddox.


O0   66,843
« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 01:49:03 AM by Bison66 »
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Offline Bison66

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QUOTE FROM TWITTER

Ruth H. Hopkins

@RuthHHopkins

While the Nation honors U.S. Presidents today, I’m celebrating my favorite Chiefs. I’ll start with 1 of my ancestors.

10. War Chief Wabasha II of the Mdewakanton Dakota. There’s a statue of him in MN. He lost an eye. That’s why he looks sorta gangsta. #PresidentsDay



9. Chief Lone Horn of the Minneconjou Lakota. He was an extraordinary man who could chase down a buffalo on foot. His sons were Chief Spotted Elk (Bigfoot), who was assassinated at Wounded Knee & Chief Touch-The-Clouds. Crazy Horse was his nephew.



8. Chief Standing Buffalo. I like him because he was the leader of my grandma’s Sisseton band of Dakota at the start of the reservation era. Talk about style and charisma.


 
7. The renegade War Chief Inkpaduta (Scarlet Point). He led Wahpekute Dakota in resisting the U.S. government. He ran with Sitting Bull and fought at The Battle of Greasy Grass (Little Big Horn). He had scars from surviving Smallpox.



6. Chiricahua Apache Chief Geronimo (Goyaałé). He was one of the last Chiefs to engage in combat against the U.S. military.



5. Chief Little Crow (His Red Nation) of the Mdewakanton Dakota. He led his people in The Dakota War of 1862 after the U.S. broke treaty. He had eagles tattooed on his wrists.


 
4. Tecumseh, a Shawnee Chief who along with his brother who was a prophet, attempted to establish unity among tribes. 

One of my ancestors (Chief Wabasha) fought with him.



UNQUOTE

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