News: In case some of you have forgotten, please go back and read the agreement you signed before registering on this board.   Continuous attacks on an individual, including revealing who you think a person is or sending Private Messages with threats and attacks, are grounds for removal from the registration listing.  If you can't be civil, go someplace else. Don't discredit your education by showing your "thug" personality.

Author Topic: Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan  (Read 440 times)

Offline NovaSkegee

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,707
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Assistant Coach
    • View Profile
Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan
« on: May 18, 2011, 08:26:31 AM »


May 17, 2011
 
Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan

Korean Central News Agency

Pyongyang,  (KCNA) -- Accidents are taking place one after another at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, deepening the radiation crisis as the days go by.
 
The Tokyo Electric Power Co. has so far injected cooling water into the pressure vessel, claiming that only a small amount of nuclear fuel melted in Rector No. 1 but its core remained undamaged.

But it was confirmed on May 12 that the meltdown of the core was occurring in the reactor contrary to the assertion of the company side.

As regards this matter, an advisor to the prime minister said at a press conference that he did not imagine all parts of the core would melt down.

TEPCO said that it would take quite a long time to take nuclear fuel out of the reactor now that the core was confirmed to be melting in the reactor, expressing the view that the recovery work would assume protracted nature even after the reactor has been stabilized and cooled.

And the massive leakage of the water injected into the reactor to cool nuclear fuel poses a serious problem.

NHK in a report that there was a lot of water in the basement of the building that houses Reactor No.1 said that TEPCO was of the view that that was the water contaminated by radiation of very high concentration which leaked through the hole in the pressure vessel.

It was confirmed that the level of radiation measured in the area southeast of the building of the reactor reached 2,000 millisieverts per hour at maximum.

At a time when the damage by radiation is expanding, the Tokyo Shimbun on Sunday said that one member of the group engaged in the recovery work died.

Meanwhile, radioactive cesium higher than the legal level was detected on freshwater fish caught in Iwaki City and Kitashiobara Son.

Contaminated fish was also found in waters off Iwaki City.
 
Seaweed collected from the coast near Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant and sewage in Tokyo have shown elevated levels of radiation, according to data released by an environmental group and government officials on Friday.
 
The findings, released separately by Greenpeace and Tokyo government officials, underline the difficulty of containing the water-borne spread of radiation from the Fukushima nuclear plant, which was seriously damaged by a March 11 earthquake and tsunami, triggering a still-unfolding crisis.
 

Offline Lonewolf

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,280
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Veteran
    • View Profile
    • http://www.hotmail.com
Re: Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2011, 08:40:46 AM »
Please tell me you are not going to cut and paste an article from a North Korean newspaper.
Man, I swear you should not believe everything you read. The problem has not got worst but at the same  time it has not gotten better.
Was lost in Seoul Korea,finding my way in Tokyo, Japan.

Offline Cholly

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 36,646
  • Karma: +94/-135
  • ^Olds**ts, DUMBASSwh?y & mrwh?yers**ts Prez & Hero
    • View Profile
Re: Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2011, 08:44:51 AM »
^^^^EXACTLY.


^^^SPEAKS FOR ITSELF!!!

Offline NovaSkegee

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,707
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Assistant Coach
    • View Profile
Re: Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2011, 09:37:04 AM »
Please tell me you are not going to cut and paste an article from a North Korean newspaper.
Man, I swear you should not believe everything you read. The problem has not got worst but at the same  time it has not gotten better.

So, you think that newspapers from only countries that look for weapons of mass destruction tell the truth?


So, let's use the Associated Press and FOX News
_____________________________________

May 16, 2011

Japanese in Extended Nuclear Zone Evacuate Amid New Radiation Concerns

Associated Press

TOKYO -- Japan said Monday it will stabilize and shut down its stricken nuclear power plant in six to nine months, as planned, as residents of two more towns around it evacuated amid concerns about accumulated radiation.

The government's timeline for stabilizing the plant was called into question last week after new data showed that the damage to one reactor at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex was worse than expected. That assessment also prompted the government to acknowledge that the reactor's fuel rods had mostly melted soon after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami knocked out the plant's cooling system.

Until all the reactors are safely shut down, they continue to leak radiation, though in much smaller amounts than in the early days of the disaster. Still, the sheer volume of contaminants spewed from the plant -- and their buildup in places outside the 12-mile (20-kilometer) evacuation zone -- persuaded the government to order residents to leave more towns in late April. Some of those evacuations began this weekend.

In a rare bit of good news, authorities said Monday that their original timeline for stabilizing the reactors is achievable because the temperature inside the Unit 1 reactor core has fallen to nearly 100 Celsius (212 F), a level considered safe and close to a cold shutdown.

"We believe we can stick to the current timeframe," said Goshi Hosono, the prime minister's aide and nuclear crisis task force director, referring to the timeline laid out in April of bringing the plants three troubled reactors to a cold and stable shutdown in six to nine months.

"What's crucial is how we can proceed with cooling. Even though the cores had melted, they are somewhat kept cool," Hosono said.

The plant, operated by the Tokyo Electric Power Co., is still leaking a massive amount of contaminated water -- just one of many problems facing workers who have been trying to bring it under control the last two months.

Plant workers plan to pump highly radioactive water swelling inside the Unit 3 turbine building to a makeshift storage. TEPCO took a similar step with contaminated water from another reactor after a massive leak into the Pacific in April triggered criticism in and outside Japan.

On Monday, the operator released data from initial hours of the crisis for the first time, complying with a government request. TEPCO spokesman Junichi Matsumoto said there was no indication that the quake caused damage to key reactor parts or equipment, confirming the narrative that the tsunami was the cause of the crisis.

Hosono said Monday that a similar meltdown had probably occurred Units 2 and 3 as they were both out of water for more than six hours after the March 11 power outage. Unit 1's reactor core was out of water for more than 14 hours, he revealed Monday.

Most of the fuel in Unit 1 has melted and slumped to the bottom of the pressure vessel that holds the rods together, and some of that ate through the vessel and trickled into the large beaker-shaped containment vessel, officials said.

TEPCO on Monday said there was no early indication released preliminary plant data in early hours of the crisis for the first time since the disaster, but denied speculation that there were no early indication of damage to key parts including ducts,

Meanwhile, about 50 residents from Kawamata and 64 from Iitate vacated their homes over the weekend and began to adjust to life in evacuation centers after leaving their homes over the weekend on previous government orders.

About 6,700 people remain in the two areas and are expected to leave by the end of June.

The towns are among several that have registered relatively high radiation readings but are outside a previous 12-mile (20-kilometers) radius evacuation zone around the nuclear plant.

In late April, the government said residents in these areas should prepare to evacuate over the coming month due to concerns about cumulative radiation.

Officials in Iitate said they intend to have most of the town's residents evacuated by the end of the month. The scenic, rural village had a population of 6,500 before the earthquake and about 2,000 people have already moved out voluntarily.

On Sunday, four families with babies or pregnant women left the town, according to an Iitate official who did not give his name because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

He said it is difficult to estimate how many people remain in the town because many are evacuating on their own and the village does not have details on their circumstances.

Officials said they have not set an exact date for the final evacuations because some residents may have trouble leaving -- because they own livestock or for other reasons -- and may require extra time.

While Japan worked to move people farther away from the plant, the United States loosened some of its guidance for its citizens in Japan -- which has been more stringent than Tokyo's.

Washington has recommended that Americans stay at least 50 miles (80 kilometers) from the plant, but an updated travel alert Monday said that it was safe for people to transit through that zone using a highway and rail line.





Offline NovaSkegee

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,707
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Assistant Coach
    • View Profile
Re: Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2011, 09:42:24 AM »
May 17, 2011

Scientists Track Fukushima Radiation To Study Ocean Currents





• Radioactive Isotopes Expected to Reach U.S. Coast In One To Two Years
• Woods Hole Institute To Send Research Vessel To Japan

Jeff McMahon
Forbes

http://blogs.forbes.com/jeffmcmahon/2011/05/17/scientists-will-use-fukushima-radiation-to-study-ocean-currents/

Oceanographers know that the Kuroshio current sweeps west from Japan to the Central Pacific and then toward the U.S. West Coast, but they’re less certain how it behaves after it branches toward Alaska and California.

Radiation still leaking into the sea from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant will help them document the ocean’s circulatory system.
“By the time that current reaches the Central Pacific, there are branches heading more towards Alaska and the South—that gets harder to predict,” said Ken Buesseler, a senior scientist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

“But that’s one of the things that several people hope to do by measuring these isotopes even at levels when they’re not harmful. We could actually track those ocean currents and better understand the circulation pattern in the Pacific.”

Woods Hole is preparing a research cruise to study waters off of  Japan, Beuesseler told me yesterday via email. His comments also derive from a recent interview on WGBH.

Scientists have predicted that Fukushima’s longer living isotopes—such as cesium-137, with a half-life of 30 years—will reach Hawaii in about a year and the coast of California in two to three years. By that time, the isotopes should be significantly diluted from mixing with ocean water.

“The Kuroshio current is considered like the Gulf Stream of the Pacific, a very large current that can rapidly carry the radioactivity into the interior” of the ocean, Buesseler said.

“But it also dilutes along the way, causing a lot of mixing and decreasing radioactivity as it moves offshore.”

Scientists do not expect Fukushima radiation to present a health risk in American waters—mostly because of dilution—and some of the properties of radioactive isotopes can help them understand how those waters behave.

“One of the hardest things in oceanography is getting time scales, how quickly things happen,” Buesseler said.

“I often describe the isotopes, whether they’re naturally occurring or added by man, as being little clocks. The same way you go to a hospital and have a dye test done, you might think of these as ways to track how currents move, how quickly they’re diluted.”

The Japanese intentionally dumped about 11,500 tons of water that contained high concentrations of contaminants. An unknown amount of contaminated water leaked into the ocean from a damaged reservoir, and contaminated water may still be reaching the ocean from leaks. More contamination entered the sea through fallout from the air, and through precipitation runoff.

“I consider this to be the largest accidental release to the ocean, even larger than Cherynobyl because of its proximity to the ocean,” Buesseler said. “Merely by being on the ocean, more of that release got into the ocean immediately.”

Scientists still don’t know the full content of the release that reached the ocean. The Japanese regularly test the seawater only for Iodine-131 and for two isotopes of cesium.

They have not tested for other radioactive isotopes that interest oceanographers, such as tritium and strontium, which was detected in Hawaii. Tokyo Electric Power Company conducted one seawater test for plutonium, which had been found in soil around the plant, and reported it non-detectable.

Scientists from the International Atomic Energy Agency are also interested in learning more about releases of Technetium-99, which has a half life of 210,000 years, and Iodine-129, which has a half life of 14 million years. The Japanese have released no information about those isotopes.

The IAEA also plans to track the isotopes with an eye to their impact on the ocean.

“It will be possible to follow these traces—mainly Cs-137 and Cs-134—for the next few years in the Northern Pacific,” said Hartmut Nies, a radioecologist with IAEA, during a May 5 presentation on marine impacts of Fukushima. “Water with such traces will reach the Canadian and U.S. Coast in probably one to two years’ time.”

Radiation has been found so far in only one fish species—the Japanese sand lance—but Buesseler cautioned that radiation in seafood, seaweed, and sediment near Fukushima may present a risk to the local population for some time.

It poses much less of a risk as distance increases from the spill site, for several reasons, and generally radiation poses less risk to humans in seawater than it does on land. According to Buesseler:

When radioactivity falls on the land it stays put. So there are very short pathways from the gas into the cows and into the milk supply, or directly into the water that you drink. Or just direct exposure when you’re walking on that land.

In the ocean, of course, you get the mixing process going on, so you get both vertical mixing in the ocean, sometimes in the course of a day, and offshore currents….

Radiation is shielded by seawater so direct exposure in the ocean would not be the same as if you were walking on land for the same fallout, the same deposition levels, but then there are pathways like fish and seafood that can short circuit that.

The Japanese had little choice, Buesseler believes, but to use seawater to cool the reactors after their normal cooling systems lost power—and then to release contaminated water into the sea.

“I think they probably did the right thing,” he said. “Cooling had to happen, otherwise there would have been much larger releases than what we have seen. So the choice had to be made, and there was no other source of water in sufficiently large quantities.”


Offline NovaSkegee

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,707
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Assistant Coach
    • View Profile
Re: Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2011, 09:47:53 AM »

Offline Cholly

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 36,646
  • Karma: +94/-135
  • ^Olds**ts, DUMBASSwh?y & mrwh?yers**ts Prez & Hero
    • View Profile
Re: Radiation Gets Evermore Serious in Japan
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2011, 11:08:36 AM »
 :shrug:

What is happening in Japan presents ZERO threat to us here in the States man...  :tiptoe:


^^^SPEAKS FOR ITSELF!!!

 

 

2019 Onnidan HBCU Composite Football Schedule

 

Powered by EzPortal