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Author Topic: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.  (Read 2748 times)

Offline NovaSkegee

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Offline Que82

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2010, 08:42:39 PM »
This just routine SC crap and the only thing they excel at. :no:  To me its not worth the gas to go protest because they celebrate that Confederacy crap every week.  Other states please send your racist and others who celebrate slavery, I'm sorry state's rights (to have slaves  :shrug:) to these events to help stimulate our economy and we will reciprocate.
Never discuss cheese with a rat, bread with a bird or make moves with a snake.

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Offline y04185

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2010, 08:48:11 AM »
why are they celebrating losing a war that they started. 
Fayetteville State by choice. Bronco by the Grace of GOD.

Offline Strike79

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2010, 09:22:58 AM »
why are they celebrating losing a war that they started. 
Answer:  I dunno.  But I also often wonder why negroes on this board support a political party which promotes policies and ideas that are anathema to the overwhelming majority of black folks.

Yeah, I wonder about these things.

 ;D

Offline Neymar

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2010, 09:26:58 AM »
why are they celebrating losing a war that they started. 
Answer:  I dunno.  But I also often wonder why negroes on this board support a political party which promotes policies and ideas that are anathema to the overwhelming majority of black folks.

Yeah, I wonder about these things.

 ;D

The same reason the majority of negroes on this board supports a political party which have leaders walking around talking about Obama does not speak with a "Negro Dialect"
 
;)
Rocks in glass houses mate....rocks in glass houses.


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11/6/2002- 17/4/2019

Offline Strike79

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2010, 09:52:09 AM »
why are they celebrating losing a war that they started. 
Answer:  I dunno.  But I also often wonder why negroes on this board support a political party which promotes policies and ideas that are anathema to the overwhelming majority of black folks.

Yeah, I wonder about these things.

 ;D

The same reason the majority of negroes on this board supports a political party which have leaders walking around talking about Obama does not speak with a "Negro Dialect"
 
;)
Rocks in glass houses mate....rocks in glass houses.

.......actually, its true, the gentleman does NOT speak with an negro dialect.

BTW, I noticed the foreign flag which accompanies your avatar.  In what english dialect do YOU speak, "mate"?  :)

Offline y04185

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2010, 10:13:24 AM »
why are they celebrating losing a war that they started. 
Answer:  I dunno.  But I also often wonder why negroes on this board support a political party which promotes policies and ideas that are anathema to the overwhelming majority of black folks.

Yeah, I wonder about these things.

 ;D

The same reason the majority of negroes on this board supports a political party which have leaders walking around talking about Obama does not speak with a "Negro Dialect"
 
;)
Rocks in glass houses mate....rocks in glass houses.


i don't speak with a negro dialect.  neither do my parents. 
Fayetteville State by choice. Bronco by the Grace of GOD.

Offline Neymar

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2010, 10:17:21 AM »
why are they celebrating losing a war that they started. 
Answer:  I dunno.  But I also often wonder why negroes on this board support a political party which promotes policies and ideas that are anathema to the overwhelming majority of black folks.

Yeah, I wonder about these things.

 ;D

The same reason the majority of negroes on this board supports a political party which have leaders walking around talking about Obama does not speak with a "Negro Dialect"
 
;)
Rocks in glass houses mate....rocks in glass houses.

.......actually, its true, the gentleman does NOT speak with an negro dialect.

BTW, I noticed the foreign flag which accompanies your avatar.  In what english dialect do YOU speak, "mate"?  :)

The flag is Ityopp'ya

Well I am a negro, and I grew up around negros from Ityopp'ya,Eritrea,the Sudan, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, England, Botswana, Ghana, France, The Netherlands, Nigeria, Jamaica, Barbados, Panama, South Africa, Rwanda, Bermuda, New caldonia, and Australia and they all spoke with their own dialects, while all being negros.

What authority does some old decrepit White devil have in saying how we, as a people, speak? If he was republican he would have been thrown under the bus. Only because he was a democrat, and deemed "Cool" it went ignored. If a "Cool" old white man said that to me in my face we all would be attending his funeral at the end of the week :nod:


RIP Mya Lecia
11/6/2002- 17/4/2019

Offline Neymar

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2010, 10:19:00 AM »
why are they celebrating losing a war that they started. 
Answer:  I dunno.  But I also often wonder why negroes on this board support a political party which promotes policies and ideas that are anathema to the overwhelming majority of black folks.

Yeah, I wonder about these things.

 ;D

The same reason the majority of negroes on this board supports a political party which have leaders walking around talking about Obama does not speak with a "Negro Dialect"
 
;)
Rocks in glass houses mate....rocks in glass houses.


i don't speak with a negro dialect.  neither do my parents. 

No such thing as a negro dialect because it implies that all negros speak alike when they dont.


RIP Mya Lecia
11/6/2002- 17/4/2019

Offline Que82

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2010, 10:19:29 AM »
What is a "Negro dialect"????  Are we referring to broken english/ebonics?
Never discuss cheese with a rat, bread with a bird or make moves with a snake.

Lord, remove the front teeth of my enemies so I can know them by their smile.

Offline Que82

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2010, 10:32:40 AM »
Had to research that because I wasn't clear.

Of the negro dialect in general as spoken in the United States today, there are four varieties:

1. The dialect of Virginia, especially of Eastern or Tide-water Virginia
2. The dialect of the Sea Islands of the South Atlantic States, known as the Gullah (or Gulla) dialect.
3.  The dialect spoken by the Creole negroes of Louisiana.

My bet is that ya'll are referring to this one.  :shrug:

4.  The Uncle Remus dialect  or the dialect spoken by the negroes in the great inland sections of the South and South-west. Though there have been changes in vocabulary and a decline in vigour and picturesqueness of expression, due to the influence of negro schools and to the passing of the old plantation life, this is the dialect still spoken by the majority of the older negroes in the country districts of the South, especially of the far South. The characteristics of this dialect consist wholly in adaptation of existing English words and endings, not in the introduction of new words or new endings. The plurals of all nouns tend to become regular. Thus Uncle Remus says foots (feet), toofies (teeth), and gooses (geese), though the old plural year is retained. The relative pronoun who is not used, its place being taken by which (or w’ich), what (or w’at), dat, and the more interesting which he and which dey, corresponding to Chaucer’s that he and that they. Thus: “She holler so loud dat Brer Rabbit, which he wuz gwine by, got de idee dat she wuz callin’ him.”    28
 
Another interesting characteristic of the Uncle Remus speech is found in the present tense of verbs. Uncle Remus does not say, for example, I make, you make, he makes, we make, you make, they make, but I makes, you makes, he makes, we makes, you makes, dey makes. Negro dialect, like the dialect of all illiterate peoples, is an ear dialect. The eye has nothing to do with it. The law of analogy, therefore, which is nothing more than the rule of the majority, has unfettered operation. The illiterate man, whether black or white, hearing the third person singular with its invariable s-ending far more frequently than he hears any other form of the present tense, makes it his norm and uses it for all forms of both numbers. The same is true of the verb to be, though is has not in the language of Uncle Remus entirely succeeded in dispossessing am and are.

http://www.bartleby.com/226/2011.html
Never discuss cheese with a rat, bread with a bird or make moves with a snake.

Lord, remove the front teeth of my enemies so I can know them by their smile.

Offline Neymar

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2010, 10:38:41 AM »
Had to research that because I wasn't clear.

Of the negro dialect in general as spoken in the United States today, there are four varieties:

1. The dialect of Virginia, especially of Eastern or Tide-water Virginia
2. The dialect of the Sea Islands of the South Atlantic States, known as the Gullah (or Gulla) dialect.
3.  The dialect spoken by the Creole negroes of Louisiana.

My bet is that ya'll are referring to this one.  :shrug:

4.  The Uncle Remus dialect  or the dialect spoken by the negroes in the great inland sections of the South and South-west. Though there have been changes in vocabulary and a decline in vigour and picturesqueness of expression, due to the influence of negro schools and to the passing of the old plantation life, this is the dialect still spoken by the majority of the older negroes in the country districts of the South, especially of the far South. The characteristics of this dialect consist wholly in adaptation of existing English words and endings, not in the introduction of new words or new endings. The plurals of all nouns tend to become regular. Thus Uncle Remus says foots (feet), toofies (teeth), and gooses (geese), though the old plural year is retained. The relative pronoun who is not used, its place being taken by which (or w’ich), what (or w’at), dat, and the more interesting which he and which dey, corresponding to Chaucer’s that he and that they. Thus: “She holler so loud dat Brer Rabbit, which he wuz gwine by, got de idee dat she wuz callin’ him.”    28
 
Another interesting characteristic of the Uncle Remus speech is found in the present tense of verbs. Uncle Remus does not say, for example, I make, you make, he makes, we make, you make, they make, but I makes, you makes, he makes, we makes, you makes, dey makes. Negro dialect, like the dialect of all illiterate peoples, is an ear dialect. The eye has nothing to do with it. The law of analogy, therefore, which is nothing more than the rule of the majority, has unfettered operation. The illiterate man, whether black or white, hearing the third person singular with its invariable s-ending far more frequently than he hears any other form of the present tense, makes it his norm and uses it for all forms of both numbers. The same is true of the verb to be, though is has not in the language of Uncle Remus entirely succeeded in dispossessing am and are.

http://www.bartleby.com/226/2011.html

Classic vernacular found in the minstrels of the 19th and 20th century. :no:

Harry Reid is a racialist, and any party that would have him in their ranks is racist.


RIP Mya Lecia
11/6/2002- 17/4/2019

Offline Golden Kitten

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2010, 10:39:01 AM »
Pardon 82?  :shrug: ???


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Offline Que82

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2010, 10:46:35 AM »
Pardon 82?  :shrug: ???

GK I am as puzzled as you are, because I was never aware that was considered a dialect.

It is an absolutely foolish asertion that "Uncle Remus" was a dialect.  That was more a function of a lack of education because blacks were denied educational opportunities.  That is not a dialect that is a condition.  :shrug:

I guess they were expecting a Ivy League educated black man to say,  I's here,  My toofies is hurtin, Sasha fectch me sum wata,  Michelle makes me sum  bisstits.  ???:shrug:
Never discuss cheese with a rat, bread with a bird or make moves with a snake.

Lord, remove the front teeth of my enemies so I can know them by their smile.

Offline Que82

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Re: 'Secession Ball' divides many in Charleston, S.C.
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2010, 11:00:22 AM »
Had to research that because I wasn't clear.

Of the negro dialect in general as spoken in the United States today, there are four varieties:

1. The dialect of Virginia, especially of Eastern or Tide-water Virginia
2. The dialect of the Sea Islands of the South Atlantic States, known as the Gullah (or Gulla) dialect.
3.  The dialect spoken by the Creole negroes of Louisiana.

My bet is that ya'll are referring to this one.  :shrug:

4.  The Uncle Remus dialect  or the dialect spoken by the negroes in the great inland sections of the South and South-west. Though there have been changes in vocabulary and a decline in vigour and picturesqueness of expression, due to the influence of negro schools and to the passing of the old plantation life, this is the dialect still spoken by the majority of the older negroes in the country districts of the South, especially of the far South. The characteristics of this dialect consist wholly in adaptation of existing English words and endings, not in the introduction of new words or new endings. The plurals of all nouns tend to become regular. Thus Uncle Remus says foots (feet), toofies (teeth), and gooses (geese), though the old plural year is retained. The relative pronoun who is not used, its place being taken by which (or w’ich), what (or w’at), dat, and the more interesting which he and which dey, corresponding to Chaucer’s that he and that they. Thus: “She holler so loud dat Brer Rabbit, which he wuz gwine by, got de idee dat she wuz callin’ him.”    28
 
Another interesting characteristic of the Uncle Remus speech is found in the present tense of verbs. Uncle Remus does not say, for example, I make, you make, he makes, we make, you make, they make, but I makes, you makes, he makes, we makes, you makes, dey makes. Negro dialect, like the dialect of all illiterate peoples, is an ear dialect. The eye has nothing to do with it. The law of analogy, therefore, which is nothing more than the rule of the majority, has unfettered operation. The illiterate man, whether black or white, hearing the third person singular with its invariable s-ending far more frequently than he hears any other form of the present tense, makes it his norm and uses it for all forms of both numbers. The same is true of the verb to be, though is has not in the language of Uncle Remus entirely succeeded in dispossessing am and are.

http://www.bartleby.com/226/2011.html

Classic vernacular found in the minstrels of the 19th and 20th century. :no:

Harry Reid is a racialist, and any party that would have him in their ranks is racist.

I think you meant racist.  I don't think we can generalized like that.  While I don't belong to either party I am not naive enough to think that Reid makes the whole Dem party racist no more that Jesse Helms made the whole Rep party racist.  I'm sure there are some good republicans out there, they are just normally not the ones in the the limelight and their intentions for this country are honorable.

That's like saying one ignorant poster on this board makes the whole board ignorant.  :shrug:
Never discuss cheese with a rat, bread with a bird or make moves with a snake.

Lord, remove the front teeth of my enemies so I can know them by their smile.

 

 

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