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Author Topic: It was 6 months ago today…  (Read 4667 times)

Offline iceman4221

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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #75 on: June 25, 2022, 02:46:09 PM »
Capitol riot arrests: See who's been charged across the U.S.
Dinah Voyles Pulver, Rachel Axon, Katie Wedell, Erin Mansfield, Zshekinah Collier, Tyreye Morris USA TODAY
12:00 AM EST, Jan. 15, 2021
Updated: 10:06 AM EDT, June 23, 2022

Federal prosecutors have charged more than 800 people in 48 states with participating in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, and arrests continue.

USA TODAY gathers details of those cases as the FBI continues to find and charge those responsible for the attack that left five people dead and sent lawmakers and Vice President Mike Pence fleeing to shelter.

Included are those arrested on charges federal prosecutors have filed since the riot, and those arrested by Capitol Police and D.C. Metro Police for entering the Capitol or for crimes related to weapons or violence with sentencing included also. Check back for updates.
Click link at top for the details
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Offline iceman4221

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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #76 on: June 25, 2022, 02:51:13 PM »
January 6, 2021 US Capitol Riot Attack  <<< Everything Jan 6th...
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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #77 on: July 03, 2022, 02:15:47 PM »
Oath Keepers will tell a jury they believed Donald Trump would turn them into his own personal militia on January 6
Laura Italiano Jun 30, 2022, 6:46 PM


When nine accused leaders of the Oath Keepers go on trial this fall to face seditious conspiracy charges for their role in the January 6, 2021, Capitol riot, jurors in the government's first big showcase trial will hear a defense argument that will sound outlandish to many.

Jurors will be told that the far-right extremists believed President Donald Trump would invoke the Insurrection Act as they gathered at the Capitol — 100 strong in their camo-colored tactical gear — and turn them into his own, ultra-loyal federal militia.

Their fantasy mission? To "Stop the Steal," "Defend the President," and "Defeat the Deep State," according to since-deleted rhetoric from their website. A defiant Trump would officially be their commander in chief.

"Do NOT concede, and do NOT wait until January 20, 2021," Inauguration Day. "Strike now," the Oath Keepers leader and founder, Elmer Stewart Rhodes, urged in an open letter to Trump on December 14, 2020.

"You must call us up and command us."

"I just want to fight," federal prosecutors say Rhodes complained after failing to get Trump on the phone that night, like some extremist Pinocchio with a thwarted dream of becoming a real militiaman.

Prosecutors will, of course, tell jurors a different tale.

The Feds argue in court papers that the Oath Keepers' private chat messages show sedition was their real motive.

The chats are full of references to a civil war against "the usurpers" — Joe Biden and Kamala Harris — and to using force to oppose the transfer of presidential power, which is the very definition of seditious conspiracy.

The Feds also argue that Rhodes oversaw two military-style "stacks," or formations, of Oath Keepers who forcibly breached the Capitol — and the real reason the group left DC was because the FBI had begun making arrests.

A far-fetched fantasy
"I don't necessarily understand the mindset of it," Bright, who has a private practice based in Dallas, said.

"It's not my worldview," added Bright, who spoke to Insider this week about the Oath Keepers' strategy for the trial, scheduled to begin September 26 and expected to run five or six weeks.

"But the evidence does exist that these individuals believed in it," he said of the group's hope that Trump would use the Insurrection Act to summon them into federal service against an imagined Biden-Harris "coup."

"They believed that if it was invoked, it was legal," Bright said. "And it would have been legal, arguably."

Which leads to perhaps the most eyebrow-raising part of the Oath Keepers' planned defense.

The Insurrection Act is so broadly written — leaving words like "insurrection," "militia," and "militias of the state" without clear definition — that Trump actually could have federalized the Oath Keepers, Rhodes' lawyers will tell jurors.

"It's so far-fetched, and yet it's legal," at least until a court decides otherwise, Bright said.

Experts on the Insurrection Act disagree.

"While I understand where they got the idea from, what they're saying is mostly nonsense," Joseph Nunn, an attorney for the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University's law school, said.

Nunn said there is a separate, archaic federal statute, 10 USC 246 — drafted in 1792, the same year as the original Insurrection Act — that includes a larger definition of a militia as "all able-bodied males at least 17 years of age" and "under 45 years of age."

It's a statute Rhodes has cited in his writings, though the 57-year-old believes that military vets such as himself would be eligible until age 65.

"That definition plausibly includes the Oath Keepers," Nunn said. "It also includes me. It also includes seniors in high school." It also includes the Crips street gang and the Brigham Young University men's choir.

"So it would be technically possible," Nunn said, "for the president to invoke the Insurrection Act and call on some group of civilians to act as a militia and help the president enforce the law or suppress a rebellion."

But "it's just not plausible," he said. For one, there's no framework for it. Would a federalized Oath Keepers militia be subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice? Could they be court-martialed?

And ultimately, as desperate as he was to stay in power, Trump didn't go there, most likely because "there were some people in his ear, explaining to him that he couldn't do things," Nunn said.

"There's no world in which it's remotely likely where the president of the United States would invoke the Insurrection Act," Nunn said, "and call on what is fundamentally just a social club of guys who have firearms."

Or is there? The House select committee hearings are producing evidence and witnesses that suggest Trump repeatedly seized upon moves his legal advisors told him were illegal as he clung to power.

There are a few other complications that Rhodes didn't think of, said Michel Paradis, a professor of military and constitutional law at Columbia Law School.

For one, in the centuries since 1792, virtually every state has expressly banned private paramilitary militias from acting as law enforcement in their jurisdictions.

Also, Paradis noted, there's a 1956 revision to the Insurrection Act that requires a president to first ask the insurrectionists to disperse and go home before invoking the act.

How would that even work? The Oath Keepers believed that the real insurrectionists were Biden, Harris, "communists from China," and a shadowy "deep state." Would Trump ask them to disperse, or would he ask the pro-Trump mob that breached the Capitol?

"There's simply no example throughout all of constitutional history of the president ever, essentially, creating his own draft under the Insurrection Act" and calling up civilians, Paradis said.

"It's always been done by drawing upon the militia resources of the states, what we now call the National Guard," he added.

Paradis and Nunn agree that the Insurrection Act is in dire need of a congressional overhaul that would clarify these points and better define what a president can and can't do.

"It leaves totally to the president's discretion what constitutes an insurrection," said Nunn, who has written extensively on the topic for the Brennan Center.

"And it's largely up to the president to decide, 'Do I need to activate a few hundred guys from the Maryland National Guard? Or do I send in the 1st Armored Division?'" he said.

Wouldn't it still be sedition?
The Oath Keepers' two-pronged sedition defense — that they were at the Capitol as invited rally security, and that they were awaiting the president's orders — is not an afterthought excuse, Bright noted.

"These guys were not planning this in the shadows," he said. "It all predates January 6. The government has recordings of the Oath Keepers discussing not bringing weapons into the district" until Trump gave the OK, he said.

And as president, Trump had flirted aloud with the idea of invoking the act, including against migrants at the southern border in 2019 and against George Floyd protesters in the summer of 2020, although always in the context of calling up the military or National Guard.

But did Trump — or anyone from Trumpworld — give any indication to the Oath Keepers that he would federalize them or invoke the Insurrection Act to stay in office?

"To date, we are unaware of any direct communications that ever took place between the Oath Keepers and Trump, or anyone in his inner circle," Bright said.

There's another problem with the defense: What if the government tells jurors, sure, go ahead and assume the Oath Keepers did believe Trump would federalize them, even absent any encouragement of that from Trumpworld.

Wouldn't anything the Oath Keepers did, or planned to do, as an armed, Trump-led militia obeying their commander in chief's orders as he continued to cling to power, still amount to sedition?

"I understand that," Bright said. "And that is an area of law we are really deeply looking at. We're looking into that. We anticipate that argument being made.

"It's all quite complicated," he added. "And legally, it's fascinating."
« Last Edit: July 03, 2022, 02:17:29 PM by iceman4221 »
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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #78 on: July 08, 2022, 03:09:10 PM »
Yeah, and when Olds..t wrote that bad check, he thought he was going to win the Powerball....

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Re: It was 6 months ago today… Jan. 6's Tangled Web Of Extremism
« Reply #79 on: July 11, 2022, 01:27:17 PM »
Jan. 6's Tangled Web Of Extremism
By Kaleigh Rogers and Holly Fuong
Graphics by Elena Mejía
JUL. 11, 2022, AT 6:00 AM


Mike Jensen keeps a database of bad guys. As a senior researcher at the University of Maryland’s National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), part of Jensen’s job is to identify violent events that occur in the U.S. and investigate whether the people involved have any ties to extremism. If they do, he adds them to his database.

In what he calls a “very active” year, Jensen says he might end up adding 300 individuals to the database. But after the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, Jensen’s database grew dramatically.

“We have three times that on one day that potentially qualify,” Jensen said.

After the attack on the Capitol, Jensen started putting together a social network consisting of individuals who had been charged in relation to Jan. 6 and had existing ties to extremist organizations. He found many of the defendants had connections to extremist groups prior to Jan. 6, and that these groups were connected to one another. Relationships between defendants and a shared belief in the Big Lie forged new connections between these disparate groups. It’s not that your local Proud Boys chapter is regularly planning a bowling night with the neighborhood sovereign citizens collective. But when a lie about a stolen election aligns with their respective ideologies, they’ll be sure to show up in Washington, D.C., to riot together.

More than 800 individuals have been charged in relation to the Jan. 6 attack. To identify who had existing ties to extremist organizations, Jensen analyzed court filings, news reports and social media posts. He found roughly a third of those charged had preexisting ties to extremist groups1 and nearly one in five also had verifiable contact with other defendants prior to Jan. 6.

A photo of a defendant on social media sporting a Proud Boys T-shirt (a group that has a formalized membership) wasn’t enough to consider them a member of that group, nor was simply retweeting or liking a post from a member of that group, according to Jensen. He looked for more substantial connections, such as direct messages, posting on each other’s social media pages, or having a conversation in the comments or replies of social media posts.

Jensen’s data reveals a tangled web of individuals with connections to other defendants, as well as to a number of extremist groups including the Proud Boys (a far-right extremist group that is known for street violence and boasting about “Western chauvinism”), the Oath Keepers (a far-right anti-government militia) and QAnon, the wide-ranging conspiracy theory alleging that major Democrats and Hollywood figures are part of a secret cabal of Satanic pedophiles.

These extremist organizations look isolated in the chart above, but it’s only because we’ve removed most of the person-to-person connections. “Normally [these groups] would not get along. You would not have this coalition force. But on Jan. 6, what you saw is this perfect storm that brought together each of those distinct, disparate groups and movements, to act as one cohesive group in engaging in these actions,” said Jon Lewis, a research fellow at the Program on Extremism at George Washington University. Certain ideology — like the unfounded belief that the 2020 election was stolen from former President Donald Trump — can thread together otherwise disparate groups of extremists on the right, and can mobilize members of these groups to act collectively. When this happens, a single extremist organization can reach beyond its small sphere of influence, and it can lead to deadly results, as we saw on Jan. 6.


Click link at the top for the rest of the story...
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Offline iceman4221

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« Last Edit: July 16, 2022, 12:40:47 PM by iceman4221 »
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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #81 on: July 16, 2022, 12:50:13 PM »
DOJ wants the first US Capitol rioter convicted by jury to serve 15 years
By Holmes Lybrand and Hannah Rabinowitz, CNN
Updated 8:05 PM ET, Fri July 15, 2022
Guy Reffitt in Washington, DC, federal court on February 28, 2022.


Prosecutors want the first US Capitol rioter convicted by a jury to spend 15 years behind bars -- nearly a decade longer than the most severe sentence a rioter has received so far.

In a court filing Friday, the prosecutors said Guy Reffitt, a Texas father and member of the right-wing militia the Three Percenters, should spend significant time in jail because he brought two guns to Washington, DC, guided the mob forward and planned for more violence after January 6, 2021.

"Initiated by the most fervent smaller groups and individuals within the crowd — individuals like Reffitt — and using the mob itself as a cloak for their actions, each blow helped the crowd penetrate further into the United States Capitol Police's defenses until the building itself was accessible and its occupants were at risk," prosecutors wrote.

The request from the Justice Department comes after some public outrage that rioters are not facing harsh enough prison sentences.
Reffitt's attorney, F. Clinton Broden, asked the court for a sentence of no more than two years, saying that his client did not engage in physical violence and did not enter the Capitol building, adding that his threats against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi "appear to be hyperbolic."

Reffitt will be sentenced next week.

He was convicted by a DC jury in March of each of the five counts he faced, including transporting and carrying a firearm on Capitol grounds, interfering with Capitol Police and obstructing an official proceeding.

While federal guidelines recommend Reffitt spend up to 11 years in prison, prosecutors asked the judge to go over those guidelines, citing his aim to overthrow the government.

Prosecutors noted that Reffitt specifically targeted lawmakers, saying in a recording on January 6: "I just want to see Pelosi's head hit every f**king stair on the way out. ... And (Republican leader) Mitch McConnell too."

After the riot, Reffitt doubled down on his violent threats, calling January 6 "the preface of the book" and writing a "manifesto" while in jail suggesting that more was to come, according to prosecutors. Reffitt was also convicted of obstructing justice for threatening his daughter and son should they turn him in to the FBI.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2022, 10:12:37 PM by iceman4221 »
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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #82 on: July 19, 2022, 05:13:51 PM »
Reffit is a real piece of sh!t!!!

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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #83 on: July 23, 2022, 10:56:51 PM »
A YouTuber named Baked Alaska who livestreamed himself inside the Capitol at the riot and urged others to 'occupy' the building pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge

https://www.yahoo.com/news/youtuber-named-baked-alaska-livestreamed-125438121.html

A YouTuber who stormed the Capitol last year pleaded guilty on Friday to a misdemeanor charge.

The YouTuber, Baked Alaska, recorded himself inside the Capitol building for 27 minutes.

In the video, he can be heard urging others to "occupy" the building, federal records say.

A YouTuber known as Baked Alaska pleaded guilty on Friday to a misdemeanor charge in connection to the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot.

Baked Alaska, whose real name is Anthime Gionet, stormed the Capitol on January 6 last year and livestreamed himself for 27 minutes while urging others to come inside the building, according to records from the Justice Department.

In the livestream, he's heard yelling "patriots are in control" and "whose house? Our house," an FBI agent investigating his involvement said in the records.

"The defendant is repeatedly heard encouraging other protestors not to leave," per the records.

"Occupy the Capitol let's go. We ain't leaving this bitch," he said.
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Offline Bison66

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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #84 on: July 26, 2022, 12:01:31 AM »
Should've gotten a couple years - minimum!!!

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Offline iceman4221

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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #86 on: July 27, 2022, 02:16:45 PM »
Oh well!!!
Trump supporter who assaulted police at the Capitol gets five years in prison
Jan. 6 defendant Mark Ponder told the FBI he thought the 2020 election was stolen. His sentence is tied for the longest in the Jan. 6 cases.
July 26, 2022, 1:34 PM EDT / Updated July 26, 2022, 5:38 PM EDT
By Ryan J. Reilly

WASHINGTON — A Donald Trump supporter who assaulted police officers at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, because he believed the former president's lies about the 2020 presidential election was sentenced to more than five years in prison Tuesday.

Mark Ponder, one of just four Washington residents arrested for their actions on Jan. 6, was given 63 months in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan. His sentence is tied for the longest imposed to date for Jan. 6 with that of Robert Scott Palmer, who attacked law enforcement officers with a fire extinguisher.
Click the link at the top for the rest of the story





Judge Tanya Chutkin





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« Last Edit: July 27, 2022, 03:23:55 PM by iceman4221 »
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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #87 on: August 01, 2022, 08:31:01 PM »
DOJ wants the first US Capitol rioter convicted by jury to serve 15 years
By Holmes Lybrand and Hannah Rabinowitz, CNN
Updated 8:05 PM ET, Fri July 15, 2022
Guy Reffitt in Washington, DC, federal court on February 28, 2022.


1st Capitol rioter to stand trial gets 7 years, the longest sentence for a Jan. 6 defendant so far

Federal prosecutors had sought a 15-year prison sentence.
By Alexander Mallin, Quinn Owen, and Morgan Winsor
August 01, 2022, 4:03 PM

A federal judge on Monday sentenced the first Capitol rioter convicted at trial to 87 months, or just over seven years in prison -- the longest term of incarceration thus far for a defendant in the Justice Department's criminal investigation of the Jan. 6 assault on Congress.

Guy Wesley Reffitt, 49, of Wylie, Texas, was convicted by a federal jury in March of five felony counts, including obstruction of justice as well as entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a firearm.

Federal prosecutors with the U.S. Department of Justice had asked that Reffitt be sentenced to 15 years in prison. Prosecutors had also -- for the first time -- asked a federal district court judge to apply a terrorism enhancement, which would effectively define under law that a rioter's actions amounted to domestic terrorism.

"We do believe that what he was doing that day was domestic terrorism and we do believe that he's a domestic terrorist," Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Nestler said Monday.

But the judge overseeing Reffitt's case, Dabney Friedrich, turned down the request, saying that there have been multiple other defendants from the Jan. 6 attack where DOJ chose not to pursue the terrorism enhancement, despite their conduct appearing to be much more serious and threatening than what Reffitt was convicted of at trial.

Reffitt's attorney, Clinton Broden, argued the DOJ was unfairly seeking to make an example of Reffitt simply because he took his case to trial.

"This is the only case where the government has asked for the terrorism enhancement, and this is the only case where the defendant has gone to trial," Broden said. "I don't think it takes a rocket scientist to figure that out."

Reffitt is among the more than 850 people who have been charged in connection with the deadly breach of the Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, which disrupted a joint session of Congress convened to ascertain and count the electoral votes related to the 2020 presidential election. Over 200 defendants have already pleaded guilty to a variety of misdemeanors and felony charges, with some being sentenced to years in federal prison.

Reffitt's attorney, Clinton Broden, asked that his client be sentenced to no more than two years. He said he was shocked by the prosecution's recommendation, since his client wasn't accused of entering the Capitol or assaulting any police officers that day.

"It's absolutely absurd," Broden told The Associated Press during a telephone interview last month. "I certainly don't condone what Mr. Reffitt did. And I think everybody realizes the seriousness of the offenses. But at the same point, there has to be some proportionality here."

Federal sentencing guidelines in Reffitt's case called for a prison sentence ranging from nine years to 11 years and three months.

During the trial, prosecutors sought to cast Reffitt, a member of the Texas Three Percenters militia group, as a ringleader of one of the first waves of the mob that breached the Capitol from the building's west side.

Videos played in court showed Reffitt climbing a stone banister near where scaffolding had been put up in advance of President Joe Biden's inauguration, and Reffitt confronting U.S. Capitol Police officers who warned him to back down before they fired less-than-lethal ammunition and pepper spray to stop his advance. Other videos presented in court showed Reffitt gesturing to the crowd behind him in what appeared to be an attempt to get them to move up the stairs toward multiple entryways that lead into the building.

At one point in the trial, prosecutors played first-person footage that Reffitt had recorded with a 360-degree camera mounted on his helmet while in the crowd at the "Save America" rally prior to the attack.

"We're taking the Capitol before the day is out," Reffitt says in the video. "Everybody is in the same harmony on that ... dragging 'em out kicking and f***ing screaming."

"I didn't come here to play games ... I just want to see Pelosi's head hit every f***ing stair on the way out," he says later. "I think we have the numbers to make it happen ... without firing a single shot."

The Justice Department's case also relied on two key witnesses: Rocky Hardie, a former member of the Texas Three Percenters, who testified against Reffitt in exchange for immunity to cooperate, and Reffitt's 19-year-old son, Jackson, who submitted an online tip to the FBI first alerting them to his father's plans weeks before the riot, ultimately leading to Reffitt's arrest on Jan. 16, 2021.

During an interview with ABC News from jail last December, Reffitt said he "never expected anything like this to happen."

"This has been disastrous for me and my family, especially for my girls, my son -- actually, all of my family," Reffitt told ABC News
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Offline Bison66

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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #88 on: August 07, 2022, 12:57:11 PM »
If only for threatening his own kids, Reffitt should have gotten MORE TIME!!!

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Re: It was 6 months ago today…
« Reply #89 on: August 30, 2022, 09:15:16 AM »



 

 

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