News: FYI:  We have three websites in our inventory: onnidan.com - news, recaps, blogs, black college sports page | onnidan1.com - this forum  | onnidan2.com - composite hbcu football schedule

Author Topic: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??  (Read 425 times)

Offline thatd@mnYOGI

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,577
  • Karma: +51/-63
    • View Profile
Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’ and needs $32 million to stop erosion

Maurice Pitts, the director of facilities at Southern University in Baton Rouge wanted to make it clear Monday that what he was saying about the campus’ worsening erosion problem is “no exaggeration.”  The campus, situated on the Mississippi River is “falling into the river,” Pitts said. “It has become a safety hazard.”


https://lailluminator.com/2021/06/30/southern-university-in-baton-rouge-is-falling-into-the-river-and-needs-32-million-to-stop-erosion/

that's all...   :o

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2021, 09:24:48 PM »
I know it sounds like the entire campus is about to fall into the river, but it is far from that.  SU's campus is situated on the wide side of the river's bend just north of Baton Rouge.  Everybody knows that the wide side of a river's bend experiences the most erosion, since the water's velocity is the highest at those points.  There are a few buildings that are located on that side of the campus that would need immediate attention if nothing is done. IMO, it's the responsiblity of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to protect properties endangered by the constant changing of the river.  Some areas along the ravine that runs through the campus have been fixed, especially the recently constructed retaining wall (subsurface steel sheet pile retaining wall with a concrete cap) behind the ROTC buildings. I do believe the Corp has plans to build a concrete retaining wall along SU's campus and the river. Now that Biden's trillion dollar infrastructure plan seems likely to pass, I'm sure the article is a way of pushing legislation to fund that retaining wall, which would be similar to the concrete retaining wall along downtown Baton Rouge.  The scenic view of the river from SU's campus is beautifully breathtaking, but like the lyrics in our alum mater 'AS MIGHTY AS THE RIVERS THAT FLOW ON TO THE SEA' the Mississippi River is a very powerful force in nature that could cause some problems.

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2021, 09:44:50 PM »
To add, the Student Health Center mentioned in the article is located off the ravine and not the river. Since the ravine discharges into the Mississippi River, the rise and fall of waters in the ravine is what causing the problems for the Student Health Center.  I would assume they would do the same for the Student Health Center like they did for the ROTC Buildings. IMO, if they could build some type of structure, such as a dam with a control flow spillway that could control the DRASTIC rise and fall of waters in the ravine where the water levels are not so drastic, this could quite possibly neutralize most of the erosion along the ravine. Also, the dam would more than likely create a small beautiful lake running through SU's campus. SU is probably one of the few college campuses that discharges directly into the Mississippi River via the campus ravine, which is why I've advocated that SU's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering start receiving major research dollars from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  As close in proximity LSU's campus is to the Mississippi River, it does not drain into the Mississippi River. Stormwaters from LSU's campus drains into the Amite River basin, which is located at the East Baton Rouge and Livingston Parishes line.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2021, 08:50:57 PM by JAG89 »

Offline ‘87 Alum

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 34,772
  • Karma: +149/-324
  • The Pride of the Swift Growing South!
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2021, 08:56:08 AM »
Just as long as it’s not the same Army Corps of Engineers that oversaw the Katrina flooding prep work….



Offline y04185

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 71,760
  • Karma: +85/-1189
  • Assistant GM
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2021, 11:13:58 AM »
Just as long as it’s not the same Army Corps of Engineers that oversaw the Katrina flooding prep work….

It wasn't the Corps. It was the locals.

Jag, if Southern's erosion problem isn't earmarked in the infrastructure bill you guys will be all wet. 

Your school should have not waited so late to fix things.
Fayetteville State by choice. Bronco by the Grace of GOD.

Online CU1994

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,709
  • Karma: +155/-289
    • View Profile
    • www.cheyney.edu
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2021, 12:18:03 PM »
Climate change is real.

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2021, 02:03:36 PM »
Just as long as it’s not the same Army Corps of Engineers that oversaw the Katrina flooding prep work….

It wasn't the Corps. It was the locals.

Jag, if Southern's erosion problem isn't earmarked in the infrastructure bill you guys will be all wet. 

Your school should have not waited so late to fix things.

SU didn't wait so late.  This has been a problem for over the past couple of decades. When I worked consultant in Louisiana, I had actually sat down with individuals with the Corps at SU and discussed this with them approximately ten years ago. They knew about the problems then, but the Republican led Congress was not funding any spending bills, which included emergency spending bills. Basically, Republicans do not care about the country's infrastructure. I'm sure the two individuals from the Corps were Mississippi State graduates. One of the mitigating factors they were considering was building an amphitheater just off the river right behind SU's Museum of Arts/old chapel.  The way I see it, SU is trying to get ahead of the curve with this article before Biden's infrastructure bill is passed.  IMO, the dam I previously mentioned could function with two purposes, not only as a means of neutralizing erosion along the ravine through the campus, but another road access to and from the back of the campus, basically a mini Hoover Dam.  My only problem with the dam, it would routinely need checking and maintenance throughout its life cycle, but SU does have a Civil Engineering Department that could do such.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2021, 02:40:23 PM by JAG89 »

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2021, 03:26:02 PM »
Just as long as it’s not the same Army Corps of Engineers that oversaw the Katrina flooding prep work….

It wasn't the Corps. It was the locals.

Jag, if Southern's erosion problem isn't earmarked in the infrastructure bill you guys will be all wet. 

Your school should have not waited so late to fix things.

Also, the levee walls that failed in the Lower 9th Ward were built and maintained by the Corps.  Most levees were/are built by the Corps, especially if they are along some navigable channel. After Katrina, the Corps replaced the levee walls and built the Great Wall of New Orleans, technically known as the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC) Lake Borgne Surge Barrier to keep waters from Lake Borgne and the Gulf of Mexico from surging into New Orleans during hurricanes.  They also closed off the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal aka MR-GO. Now if barges want to head out to the Gulf from the intracoastal waterway, they would have to pass through a huge gate built in the wall.  The wall is a massive concrete barrier that is approximately 9,500 feet long or 1.8 miles long (almost 2 miles long).  Below is a video of its construction, basically batter piles (piles driven in the ground at some angle) driven deep in the ground to withstand massive tidal surges.  Watch the video, you might learn something.



« Last Edit: July 02, 2021, 03:51:53 PM by JAG89 »

Offline Golden Kitten

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 43,779
  • Karma: +124/-211
  • Student Advokitty/Fashion Police
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2021, 05:49:12 PM »
89,

My nephew lived in Jones Hall in the middle '90s and I thought then it was going to fall into the river... :nod:


Teeny and Little

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2021, 07:58:33 PM »
89,

My nephew lived in Jones Hall in the middle '90s and I thought then it was going to fall into the river... :nod:

Jones Hall no longer exists.  It was demo about a year ago and it was quite a distance from the river and closer to the ravine (approximately 450 feet from the ravine).  There's only like five buildings (Old Housing Administration Building, Navy and Army ROTC buildings, Student Health Center, and Student Counseling Center) that butt up to the ravine. Both the Student Health Center and the Student Counseling Center are the two buildings that need immediate attention due to the erosion along the ravine. The area behind the Old Housing Administration Building and the ROTC buildings have been stabilized as previously mentioned. The other areas of concerned are the roads (Elton C. Harrison and B. A. Little Drives) that crosses the ravine and the road (Jesse N. Stone Avenue) that run adjacent to the ravine. New concrete box drainage culverts have recently been installed across Elton C. Harrison Drive. I'm not sure if anything has been done for B. A. Little Drive which is the access road for SU Ag Center and SU Facility/Physical Plant. The rest of the buildings on campus are a good distance from the ravine, but erosion is still a major problem along the unprotected areas of the ravine.  Most of what I've just described can be viewed on Google Earth.

A copy of SU's Digest with the demolition of Jones Hall on the front page:
https://image.isu.pub/200922144746-57b148451b49bbfbfee3988a2c662070/jpg/page_1.jpg
« Last Edit: July 02, 2021, 08:38:46 PM by JAG89 »

Offline Mosadi

  • Prophyte
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2021, 03:25:18 PM »
@Jag,

I know that in the last few years Southern has gotten commitments/appropriations for substantial construction and renovation on campus.  In the short term, might they consider moving those buildings (or activities housed by them) and then addressing the longer-term problem?  I would think that a damn or something like that would take at least 3-5 years to plan and fully implement if they are starting from scratch.

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2021, 04:45:12 PM »
@Jag,

I know that in the last few years Southern has gotten commitments/appropriations for substantial construction and renovation on campus.  In the short term, might they consider moving those buildings (or activities housed by them) and then addressing the longer-term problem?  I would think that a damn or something like that would take at least 3-5 years to plan and fully implement if they are starting from scratch.

Building new buildings somewhere else on campus might be the better option, since both buildings (Student Health and Student Counseling Centers) are small and probably have no historical value, whereas the Old Housing Administration building and the ROTC buildings are a lot larger with some historical value. Therefore, it probably made sense for them to stabilize the ravine immediately behind those buildings. IMO, the dam would be a long term fix of stabilizing the erosion along the entire length of the ravine, so that the water levels in the ravine stays at some constant height. I'm sure the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is working with SU on the best options. I like the dam option, since it could potentially provide another access road to the back of the campus, where majority of the on-campus dormitories and apartments are located. Also, maybe they could build the dam with hydroelectric capabilities, basically a mini Hoover Dam. If they do that the electricity it generates could supply SU's campus and feed into Baton Rouge's power grids. IMO, this could give SU's Engineering Department (Civil and Electrical Engineering) another visually structure on-campus as a topic of discussion.

Offline Mosadi

  • Prophyte
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2021, 08:57:09 PM »
I appreciate the response.  Southern has so much potential, but so little support at the state level IMO, which has changed at least temporarily with Gov. Edwards.  I was looking at it for a project comparing desegregation agreements/litigation at HBCUs.  The Louisiana HBCUs were really ill-served by the settlement. 

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2021, 12:44:16 AM »
I appreciate the response.  Southern has so much potential, but so little support at the state level IMO, which has changed at least temporarily with Gov. Edwards.  I was looking at it for a project comparing desegregation agreements/litigation at HBCUs.  The Louisiana HBCUs were really ill-served by the settlement.

Louisiana is definitely a red state.  IMO, Grambling is in a worse position, since it's part of UL System along with eight other PWI's in Louisiana, whereas the SU System is the only HBCU system in the country. Both SU and GSU still depends on the State for funding.  I believe when Jindal was Governor, the State's funding went from over 50% to 20%, which was a substantial decrease for both SU and GSU.

Offline JAG89

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,176
  • Karma: +46/-16
    • View Profile
Re: Southern University in Baton Rouge is ‘falling into the river’??
« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2021, 06:13:12 AM »
FYI

Here's an architectural rendering of the concrete retaining wall in Baton Rouge Business Report under an article entitled Reimagining Southern.  The building behind it is the proposed Alumni and Economic Development Center. Notice the amphitheater built in the stepped down wall, which is a slightly different location near the Southern University Museum of Arts (SUMA). Maybe they have plans to build two amphitheater areas along the wall. Also, I'm not sure what they have in plans for the Clark Family's (The 1st family of Southern University) gravesite and the Red Stick Sculpture.  Those two iconic symbols are located in the same area.



Article:
https://www.businessreport.com/business/reimagining-southern

Red Stick Sculpture:


Clark Family's gravesite:


« Last Edit: July 15, 2021, 06:28:25 AM by JAG89 »

 

 

2019 Onnidan HBCU Composite Football Schedule

 

Powered by EzPortal