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Author Topic: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER  (Read 22846 times)

Offline CIAA-FAN

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #690 on: June 10, 2021, 09:20:54 AM »

Coronavirus Cases:

34,264,792 


Deaths:

613,494



Recovered:

28,254,091
2X CIAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS - 2019 & 2020

Offline CIAA-FAN

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #691 on: June 10, 2021, 09:11:48 PM »

Coronavirus Cases:
34,274,362
Deaths:
613,898

Recovered:
28,277,282
2X CIAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS - 2019 & 2020

Offline CIAA-FAN

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #692 on: June 13, 2021, 11:50:02 PM »
« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 11:53:04 PM by CIAA-FAN »
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Offline soflorattler

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #693 on: June 14, 2021, 12:01:57 AM »
Haiti fights large COVID-19 spike as it awaits vaccines

https://apnews.com/article/caribbean-haiti-coronavirus-pandemic-health-ca565e5a0d7921f6e2bec2b0768f9432

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — Ever since the pandemic began, Haiti had perplexed experts with seemingly low infection and death rates from COVID-19 despite its rickety public health system, a total lack of vaccines and a widespread disdain for safety measures like masks and distancing.

That is no longer the case.

The few Haitian hospitals treating COVID cases have been so swamped in recent days that they report turning away patients, while plans to open another hospital to treat the infected have been delayed.

Official figures remain relatively low for a nation of more than 11 million people: Just 2,271 cases and 62 deaths have been recorded over the past month in government data collected by Johns Hopkins University. A total of 15,700 cases and more than 330 deaths have been reported since early last year.

But experts are united in saying those figures miss the true scale of what they say is the largest spike in cases since the new coronavirus first landed.

The government declared a health emergency on May 24 and imposed a curfew and safety measures — though few Haitians appear to be following them. Most shun, or can’t afford, face masks and it’s nearly impossible to keep a distance while shopping in bustling marketplaces or riding the crowded, colorful buses known as tap taps that most Haitians rely on to get around.

“There is no time to waste,” said Carissa Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization, which is working with the government to scale up testing to identify and isolate infected people — a difficult task in a place where few think they can afford to be sick.

Sanorah Valcourt, a 27-year-old mother and hairstylist, said she felt sick for for two weeks last month with a fever and symptoms including loss of taste. But she didn’t get tested, or even take measures such as wearing face masks she finds uncomfortable.

“I didn’t feel well enough to hop on a tap tap and spend hours at a hospital to get tested,” she said.

The lack of cases early this year had led authorities to reduce the number of beds available for COVID patients to about 200 — more than half of those at the nonprofit St. Luke Foundation for Haiti in the capital of Port-au-Prince.

But by early this month, that clinic was at capacity and announced it was turning away patients.

“Many people are dying on arrival in ambulances,” the foundation said. “We have received many nuns as patients, a sure sign (COVID-19) is in the poorest areas.”

Marc Edson Augustin, medical director of the St. Luke hospital, said he’s especially worried about the deaths he has seen among those aged 17 to 22, and that groups of up to seven people are showing up at the same time seeking treatment for COVID.

“The situation is real, and we want to tell people that the situation is getting worse,” he said. “We’re working to keep people alive as much as possible.”

Haiti’s Health Ministry had planned to have another 150 beds elsewhere for COVID-19 patients, but that effort was delayed. Meanwhile, Bruno Maes, representative in Haiti for UNICEF, said the children’s agency is working to help hospitals get oxygen and fuel.

“It’s not enough, for sure,” he said. “We have to be ready for a bigger influx of cases. ...It could get out of control.”

So far, Haiti hasn’t received a single vaccine, though officials say they expect to get 130,000 AstraZeneca doses this month.

The U.S. government also said it would donate a portion of six million doses for Haiti, though officials haven’t specified how many or when they will arrive.

Some 756,000 doses of AstraZeneca shots had been slated to arrive in May via the United Nations’ COVAX program for low-income countries, but they were delayed due to the government’s concern over possible clotting as a side effect and a lack of infrastructure to keep the vaccines properly refrigerated.

PAHO said it would help Haiti’s Health Ministry solve those problems, and is prioritizing vaccinating health workers.

The medical system also has been struggling with other problems, including unpaid wages for some workers. President Jovenel Moïse recently asked the Ministry of Economy and Finance to ensure they get paid.

Even when vaccines arrive, experts worry many people may not get a jab — some for fear of venturing through crime-wracked neighborhoods to reach a clinic.

Valcourt mentioned such dangers as one reason why she avoided getting tested. Like many Haitians, she turned to a home remedy — in her case, a tea made with parsley, garlic, lime, thyme and cloves.

Manoucheka Louis, a 35-year-old street merchant who sells plantains and potatoes, said she got sick earlier this year but didn’t have the roughly $20 needed to see a private doctor, who she trusts more than public institutions.

“Health care is not something I can afford,” she said, adding that she was coughing a lot and was fighting a fever, loss of taste and an aching body and head. Her two children had the same symptoms, and they all relied on homemade teas and regular cold medicine.

She said she still can’t afford to always wear a mask. They can cost about 50 cents each in a country where many people make less than a dollar or two a day.

Offline Nomenclature

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #694 on: June 14, 2021, 12:08:25 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/12/world/china-covid-delta-variant-guangzhou.html

Delta Variant Producing More Severe Illness, Doctors in China Say

"Up to 12 percent of patients become severely or critically ill within three to four days of the onset of symptoms,"

Offline soflorattler

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #695 on: June 14, 2021, 12:27:39 AM »
Just waiting to see what happens when it hits these anti-vaxxers and anti-maskers. :nod:

Offline soflorattler

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #696 on: June 14, 2021, 12:34:24 AM »
Moscow Shuts Down Workweek Over Massive COVID-19 Spike

Moscow's mayor has announced a non-working week on June 15-19 in response to a spike in COVID-19 cases, as both the Russian capital and the rest of the country reported the highest number of new coronavirus infections since winter.

Also on June 12, Russia's national pandemic task force said that the daily tally of confirmed cases had risen by 47 percent over the past week, including more than a doubling in Moscow to over 6,700 cases in 24 hours.

It cited 13,510 new infections nationally in the previous day.

Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin said restaurants, bars, and similar venues in the city may not serve customers after 11 p.m. until at least June 20.

And enforcement of mask- and glove-wearing on public transportation and in public places will be bolstered, with violators facing fines of up to 5,000 rubles ($70).

Meanwhile, Interfax quoted Russian President Vladimir Putin as saying that 18 million Russians have so far been vaccinated against COVID-19.

Russia has around 144 million people.

Sobyanin said Moscow authorities "expected that the spring pandemic peak would fall in April-May, just like last year," but that "now we're seeing that it has shifted toward June-July."

Sobyanin has estimated that around half of Moscow residents now have some level of immunity against the virus, presumably from previous infection or vaccination, although the source of that figure was unclear.

More than 125,000 coronavirus deaths have been registered by authorities since the start of the pandemic, but many experts say officials vastly underreport fatalities.

The federal statistics agency, Rosstat, has kept a separate toll and has said that Russia recorded around 270,000 deaths related to COVID-19 between April 2020 and April 2021.

Russia approved Sputnik V, the world's first coronavirus vaccine, for use beginning last August, but authorities have struggled to ramp up vaccination efforts.

https://www.rferl.org/a/russia-moscow-covid-spike-shutdown/31303958.html

Offline soflorattler

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #697 on: June 14, 2021, 12:39:01 AM »

Offline Nomenclature

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #698 on: June 14, 2021, 12:59:33 AM »
With America wide open and vax rates stagnant, the next few months are going to worse than 2020 around here with the Delta variant circulating.

Offline CIAA-FAN

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #699 on: June 14, 2021, 03:40:59 PM »

Coronavirus Cases:
34,323,315
Deaths:
615,097

Recovered:
28,403,001
2X CIAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS - 2019 & 2020

Offline CIAA-FAN

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #700 on: June 14, 2021, 03:43:07 PM »
I CONTINUE TO WEAR A MASK (PROPERLY), PRACTICE SOCIAL DISTANCING, AND WASH MY HANDS WITH HOT SOAPY WATER (FREQUENTLY).  :nod:
2X CIAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS - 2019 & 2020

Offline Nomenclature

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #701 on: June 14, 2021, 08:59:02 PM »
Cuba and China are working together to develop a universal coronavirus vaccine. This would target not just Covid-19 but all coronaviruses (including SARS and MERS), thereby anticipating future coronavirus epidemics.

https://oncubanews.com/en/coronavirus/pan-corona-cuban-chinese-research-to-anticipate-next-epidemics/

Offline soflorattler

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #702 on: June 16, 2021, 05:05:45 PM »
Despite Odds Stacked Against It, New Mexico's Vaccination Rate Is Near The Top

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/16/1005505950/despite-odds-stacked-against-it-new-mexicos-vaccination-rate-is-near-the-top

Shoppers and diners are slowly returning to Albuquerque's trendy Nob Hill neighborhood.

It's a welcome sign to Mike and Kathy Holmberg of Arizona, who are on their first visit back to New Mexico since the start of the pandemic. They typically spend summers here in the mountains where it's cooler. But the couple also noticed New Mexico feels much more cautious than Arizona. Restaurants here still require customers to give their name and phone number for contact tracing. Businesses still operate under strict capacity limits.

"You see most people wearing masks yet, most businesses are requiring it," Mike Holmberg says. "Arizona's a lot more wide open."

The Holmberg's, who are fully vaccinated, say they feel safer here. Neighboring Arizona is still near the top in the nation for cases per capita but closer to the bottom when it comes to vaccinations.

In fact, New Mexico has emerged as a lone standout among Sunbelt states that tend to have the lowest vaccination rates in the nation. Generally, the restrictions are far tighter than in surrounding states run by Republican governors.

Here, some counties are close to vaccinating 90% of their adult populations. New Mexico has been one of the top-10 states for vaccination rates for weeks now. Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, who was the former state health secretary, has said the state's restrictions will only be fully lifted after 60% of adults are fully inoculated.

"We have been really cautious in this state to make sure we really contain this virus," says Dr. Tracie Collins, the current secretary of the New Mexico Department of Health. "We are aware of what it takes to save this state and that's what we're doing."

About 40% of New Mexicans are on Medicaid and a large chunk of the population is considered vulnerable due to preexisting health issues.
But the flip side of that is that the state has long invested in its public health system. Collins says they adapted and responded to COVID-19 quickly, with efficient testing. When the vaccines came online, there was only one central database and place to sign up run by the state, which has been credited with eliminating the early confusion and chaos seen in many other states.

"There was a lot of messaging to help people understand the importance of this vaccine as our way of getting back to something that seems normal, after having gone through a year of just, you know, torment," Collins says.


Nationally, public health experts also credit New Mexico's success to it prioritizing getting the vaccine out to the most
vulnerable, often tribal and rural communities. Leave the cities, and the vaccination numbers do tend to go down, but not nearly as much as rural America writ large.

Reaching the most vulnerable

In Guadalupe County, population 3,500 not including the private prison, close to 70% of the adult population has now had at least one shot. The county skews older, sicker and some folks in the more remote areas still rely on poorly ventilated wood stoves for heat, according to Christina Campos, administrator at the Guadalupe County Hospital.

The 10-bed public hospital is the only place to get the vaccine as well. One mass vaccination event earlier this year drew about 800 people.

"They trust us to take good care of them and we really pushed the vaccines," Campos says.

On a recent morning when some in the community were returning to the hospital for their booster shots, Campos noted that trust in institutions and the government remains strong in her rural county. The government isn't seen as overreaching, which she figured was a big reason why New Mexico has weathered the pandemic better than many other states.

Generally people here are taking the virus seriously.

"This area is an incredibly culturally conservative area but Democrat," Campos says. "It's just very different from many other states."

Outbreaks are still happening

Of course, rural New Mexicans also took it seriously because they were hit hard, especially in places like the Navajo Nation. Over the past year, Guadalupe County saw three big spikes with numerous hospitalizations. Recently, health officials here watched with frustration as outbreaks occurred after large family gatherings around Cinco de Mayo and Mother's Day. The high school graduation had to be postponed as a result.

"It's been very hard," says Erlinda Saiz, as she waited in the lobby while her 18-year-old son, Ruben, got his second Moderna shot.

Her teen daughters are home with the virus. They think they got it from their grandparents who aren't vaccinated. Saiz's father-in-law is still sick at home but her mother-in-law recently had to be transferred to a hospital in the Albuquerque area. She's wringing her hands with worry. She's a supervisor at a long term care facility so she's been vaccinated since February.

"I got the vaccine to make sure to protect the seniors and my kids but obviously it's not enough," Saiz says.

Just like in most other states, vaccination rates in New Mexico have started plateauing lately. Multiple health leaders interviewed for this story expressed frustration seeing outbreaks still happening when there is a readily accessible, free prevention tool widely available.

"I'm concerned that a single other person will get COVID and die from COVID," says Jason Mitchell, the chief medical officer at Presbyterian Health, the largest hospital system in the state. "We now have an essentially preventable disease and for those that are vaccinated the pandemic is over. And for those that are not vaccinated, it's still raging."

A return to "normal"

Health officials are hopeful that a newly launched state lottery will encourage more people to get shots in their arms. Many businesses are also eager for the state to fully reopen. The governor has set a target date of the end of this month for hitting the 60% mark, triggering a full return to pre-pandemic life, or some semblance of it.

Back in Albuquerque's Nob Hill, along Central Ave., the economic toll of the pandemic is real.

"If you walk up and down, we have quite a few vacancies," says Anthony Chavez. "Nobody is moving in."

Chavez, who owns First Choice Consignment and Decor, was setting out some items for sale on the sidewalk in front of his shop before opening. Kelly's Brew Pub next door to him is now permanently closed. He used to rely on spillover customers from that bar and another shuttered restaurant across the street.

Only the flower shop next door is flourishing. Chavez is lucky if he'll get two or three customers a day anymore.

"Tough is not the word, I mean, I'm at the point of, do I want to keep the business or sell my home?" he says.

As a business owner, Chavez has barely survived New Mexico's efforts to keep the virus contained. He hopes the state's high vaccination rate means customers return soon. His unemployment runs out in July.

Offline CIAA-FAN

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #703 on: June 19, 2021, 01:54:27 AM »

Coronavirus Cases:
34,393,269
Deaths:
616,920

Recovered:
28,675,929
2X CIAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS - 2019 & 2020

Offline CIAA-FAN

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Re: CORONAVIRUS WORLDOMETER
« Reply #704 on: June 21, 2021, 09:33:14 AM »

Coronavirus Cases:

34,406,019 


Deaths:

617,166



Recovered:

28,711,315
2X CIAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS - 2019 & 2020

 

 

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