News: In case some of you have forgotten, please go back and read the agreement you signed before registering on this board.   Continuous attacks on an individual, including revealing who you think a person is or sending Private Messages with threats and attacks, are grounds for removal from the registration listing.  If you can't be civil, go someplace else. Don't discredit your education by showing your "thug" personality.


Author Topic: The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It  (Read 25 times)

Online Olde Hornet

  • Assistant GM
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,191
  • Karma: +90/-1
    • View Profile
The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It
« on: January 20, 2020, 11:43:29 AM »
The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It .  :read:

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/18/technology/clearview-privacy-facial-recognition.html?utm_source=pocket-newtab:read:

The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It .  :popcorn:

A little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something,” a backer says.

Until recently, Hoan Ton-That’s greatest hits included an obscure iPhone game and an app that let people put Donald Trump’s distinctive yellow hair on their own photos.

Then Mr. Ton-That — an Australian techie and onetime model — did something momentous: He invented a tool that could end your ability to walk down the street anonymously, and provided it to hundreds of law enforcement agencies, ranging from local cops in Florida to the F.B.I. and the Department of Homeland Security.

His tiny company, Clearview AI, devised a groundbreaking facial recognition app. You take a picture of a person, upload it and get to see public photos of that person, along with links to where those photos appeared. The system — whose backbone is a database of more than three billion images that Clearview claims to have scraped from Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites — goes far beyond anything ever constructed by the United States government or Silicon Valley giants.

Federal and state law enforcement officers said that while they had only limited knowledge of how Clearview works and who is behind it, they had used its app to help solve shoplifting, identity theft, credit card fraud, murder and child sexual exploitation cases.

Until now, technology that readily identifies everyone based on his or her face has been taboo because of its radical erosion of privacy. Tech companies capable of releasing such a tool have refrained from doing so; in 2011, Google’s chairman at the time said it was the one technology the company had held back because it could be used “in a very bad way.” Some large cities, including San Francisco, have barred police from using facial recognition technology.
Olde Bama State Spirit!
Alabama State University

 

Support Our Efforts

Support our efforts

With all the divisive rhetoric on social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter, websites such as ours, especially message boards, are under the watchful eye of the Internet giants. And those giants are coming down hard on sites like this one due to the perception of the need for better "oversight".

We recognize the cultural conflict that exists and over the past few months we've been accused of allowing content in posts/threads that supposedly violates some advertiser's policies. Those threads weren’t an issue in the past, but for some reason, they are an issue now. And we are being penalized (financially) because of it.

 

As a result we are coming to you directly for your financial support>

 

Please consider supporting our efforts to foster free and open discussion of current issues as they relate to the topics you are interested in. You can use the Cash App and contribute to $onnidan, or process your donation through PayPal below.

=OW= 


 

Onnidan's HBCUSports Logo
News

 
 

Powered by EzPortal