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Author Topic: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I  (Read 8766 times)

Offline wsm

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Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« on: April 14, 2017, 09:43:44 PM »
Posted April 14, 2017 08:38 pm - Updated April 14, 2017 09:13 pm
By Nathan Deen
nathan.deen@savannahnow.com

Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I

When Willie Walker started the 300 Club last year, he had a vision of giving Savannah State University better locker rooms for its student-athletes and better offices for its coaches.

Now he’s committed to raising every dollar possible to keep Tiger athletics from taking a step down one level.

SSU baseball player Turner Davis told the Savannah Morning News on Wednesday that he and other student-athletes were informed by athletic director Sterling Steward about a possible move to NCAA Division II starting in 2019. The Tigers currently compete in Division I-AA (FCS) in football and Division I in all other sports. Steward declined a request for comment.

That news has reached the ears of SSU alumni like Walker, a 1981 graduate who is now an attorney in Jacksonville, Fla., and many are willing to stand up and prevent it from happening, Walker said.

“Everyone in the alumni community is dead-set against returning to Division II,” Walker said Friday.

Walker is the CEO of the 300 Club, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that raises money for Savannah State athletics.

“We’re making sure that the resources are there so that it doesn’t happen,” Walker said about the proposed plan for SSU to drop to Division II. “Our mission has been repurposed toward raising funds toward the erasing of the deficit so our student-athletes can have a good Division I experience.”

Savannah State has spent more money than it has made for years. According to a USA Today database that lists the revenue for 231 NCAA institutions for the 2014-15 academic year, SSU made $6,100,959 in revenue and spent $6,409,247, creating a deficit of $308,288.

And SSU is far from the only school with this problem. According to a USA Today story, only five programs outside of the FBS Power 5 conferences were self-sustaining in 2015, meaning the operating revenue generated by their athletic departments was at least equal to total operating expenses. That revenue does not include money from student fees, university funding or direct government support.

Clyde Newton, president of the Savannah State University National Alumni Association, said SSU’s deficit has increased to about $1 million for 2015-16.

“We’ve known about the deficit for a few years now,” Newton said Friday. “We’ve got to do something to try to get it turned around.

“These past few years have not been good years. We’ve had some issues that have allowed that to escalate to uncomfortable levels.”

Newton said he shares Walker’s sentiment about finding a way to avoid moving down to Division II.

“We’re very concerned with the situation in the athletic department, so the stakeholders are coming together and trying to turn this situation around,” Newton said. “Our student-athletes have proven they can compete at the Division I level, and it would be a shame if they could not.”

Walker said he has a plan, one that he’s shared with Newton, in place to turn the athletic department around and keep it in Division I.

Walker and other members of the 300 Club have done an independent study breaking down Savannah State’s main sources of funding and finding ways to boost revenue within each of them. Walker said he keyed in on six sources: ticket sales, student athletic fees, game guarantees, alumni and boosters, NCAA stipends, and marketing.

Football on the rise

Walker expects ticket sales to increase significantly for the upcoming football season after the Tigers won three games under new coach Erik Raeburn for the first time this decade.

“We expect football attendance to go up significantly because we’re winning games, or there’s an expectation that we’re going to be competitive,” Walker said. “Our season-ticket sales are way ahead of where they were.”

The Tigers are also just starting to come out from under the weight of NCAA penalties and will be allowed to play an 11-game schedule for the first time since 2014. In addition to being paid by Appalachian State to play at the Mountaineers’ 2017 season opener in Boone, N.C., SSU will travel to play Montana the following week on Sept. 16.

At $300 per semester, SSU has one of the lowest student athletic fees in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, and Walker said his plan doesn’t involve raising that number.

As a member of the MEAC, Savannah State receives a portion of the $1,000,000 the conference makes from the Celebration Bowl, which creates an end-of-the year matchup between the top teams from the two HBCU conferences – the MEAC and the Southwestern Athletic Conference.

That’s money SSU would miss out on if it leaves the conference.

SSU also receives grants from the NCAA to help fund its academic programs, but the amount the university receives would decrease if it became a Division II school. The NCAA allocates $45.4 million per year to Division I schools specifically for academic enhancement. It spends $38.8 million per year to cover all costs for Division II institutions, including travel, food and lodging for championship games.

For boosters and alumni, Walker said he’s reached out to many of his contacts to discuss ways on how they can raise support. More alumni bases are devoting their efforts to selling season-ticket packages. He plans to raise $100,000 this year through the 300 Club, and he’s proposing that the national alumni association, which has 30 chapters, increase its giving by $1,000 per chapter.

Walker said he has also proposed to the alumni association to form an athletic foundation that would operate under the University System of Georgia, a process that could be completed by July. Based on that model, each foundation board member would be required to raise a minimum of $10,000 annually, Walker said.

All in all, Walker has calculated that his plan will generate $800,000 in additional revenue its first year and $1.25 million in subsequent years.

“If it’s truly about money, we’re up to the task,” Walker said. “We’re used to fighting for things. We’ve always had to fight for our space, all of our hopes and dreams as a university, and that’s why we’re still here. When these times have come, we’ve always risen to the challenge.”

http://savannahnow.com/news/sports/local-colleges/2017-04-14/alumni-ready-fight-ssu-stay-division-i



Offline eagle pride

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2017, 10:05:55 PM »
 :clap:  Best wishes!   :clap:  I hope this works out to shut the naysayers up. 
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Online bluedog

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2017, 10:44:11 PM »
Uhm shouldn't this have happened a years ago :shrug: rallying just to "stay in the game" is hardly even a start for what is needed at D1. :tiptoe:

SSU belongs in D2 and I am glad your university is doing the right thing.

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Offline thatd@mnYOGI

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2017, 11:09:33 PM »
Mr. Walker can't increase the student athletic fee anyway. He is neither an administrative nor on the BOARD OF REGIME. I applaud Savannah State continuing this fight over a decade of doing so one would have given up by now. But, eventually, reality is going to set in and the arrogance of a few are going to have to deal with it. The fight they need to be having is what's transpiring in their own backyard with these mergers. Athletics would be the least of my worries.

that's all...

Offline Jaimac

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2017, 11:59:34 PM »
Okay.....
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Offline fsu2015mme

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2017, 12:31:48 AM »
Tf?  :brickwall: Typical... Goodluck. 
« Last Edit: April 15, 2017, 12:33:20 AM by fsu2015mme »
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Offline Conquero

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2017, 01:22:50 AM »
At Savannah State, It’s Much Bigger Than Moving Down to Division II

This should not be the typical conversation about HBCU athletics, the athletes they can’t recruit, the fans who don’t show up, the games we cannot win and the money we cannot make. Those discussions, and the umbrella conversations about the wisdom of competing at Division I are legitimate on both sides when it comes to scholarships, promotional opportunities, and visibility for institutions.

This is about the optics of opportunity in Georgia and states like it. No public HBCU in the state enrolls more students or is stationed in a more developed city than Savannah State University. It had long been on the radar of state legislators seeking to merge the school with a proximate PWI, but whispers of racism and the threat of federal litigation then and now spared the school from that measure.

By this time next year, the University System of Georgia will have completed its consolidation of Georgia Southern University and Armstrong State University. The new GSU will bring to Savannah a BCS-level athletics program, which during the 2015-16 season earned more than $18 million in revenues and $1.3 million in total profit.

Not bad for a mid-major program which moved to the BCS two years after Savannah State joined the Division I Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, and essentially doubled up SSU in total revenues.  With the consolidation, the former mid-major football powerhouse will grow its athletic brand in a strategic location; a stark contrast to SSU, which this week announced that it is considering moving down to the NCAA’s Division II.

Six years after moving to Division I and just over a year before Georgia Southern takes up real estate just nine miles from its campus, Savannah State realizes that it is too costly and not worth the struggle to maintain the membership – before a larger, better-resourced institution begins competition in the city in 2018.  Recruiting top-tier athletes will be virtually impossible. Savannah’s local media outlets in print and broadcast will be fully committed to GSU’s new digs and new potential.

And any hope SSU had at attracting corporate support and fan buy-in for its sports programs will be overrun by its new predominantly white neighbor.

But Georgia higher ed officials are seemingly content with allowing SSU to stand just long enough so that it can be outperformed athletically, academically and philanthropically by a nearby PWI with 20,000-plus students, a BCS football program and an endless supply of goodwill coming behind it.

It did not have to be this way. The USG could have just as easily consolidated Armstrong State into Savannah State in the same way it consolidated Darton State College into Albany State University. But because the Armstrong opposition lobby was too strong, and the Georgia Southern brand is big enough and diverse enough to avoid charges of limiting choice for minorities, it will flourish while Savannah State, seemingly, will wither.

From a strict sports perspective, there is a reason to applaud Savannah State for seeking out the same pressure valve Winston-Salem State University found in 2010. WSSU returned to the CIAA after a failed five-year tenure in the MEAC and won championships across the board while maintaining resonance with its fan base and the surrounding community.


In the last five years, several Division II HBCUs have been nationally-ranked in football, men’s and women’s basketball. The CIAA Basketball Tournament remains among the nation’s most viable college sports products, regardless of division. The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference has led the country in D-II football attendance for 14 straight years. On the surface, there appears to be room for optimism among Savannah State sports fans.

But from operational and cultural perspectives, the timing of this announcement could not be worse for the institution. GSU arrives with a BCS bandwagon gassed up and ready to go, while Savannah State signals to its stakeholders that the old stationwagon upon which campus excutives have been working to restore for the better part of a decade is only fit to drive to church services and cabarets.

And for Georgia taxpayers who doesn’t know the political or financial back stories of these schools, they’ll only see two vastly different cars ringing up miles for dramatically different reasons – at their expense.

This has long been the essence of the HBCU experiment in the latter part of the 20th century and into the 21st – do they grow smaller and excel at a few things through fiscal conservatism and strategic development? Or do they expand, pray for the best and expect the worse?

Today’s political climate defines smart finance as how much money can be cut instead of how much can be made. Racism, in the eyes of many white and far too many black constituents, falls into one of two piles – victimization or alternative facts. Officials gamed the system by allowing SSU to survive, but to do so against the fastest growing peer institution in the entire USG – all while many stakeholders dismissed as premature the doomsday prediction for Savannah State when word of the GSU-ASU consolidation became policy.

And now, SSU may not have enough money to remain even in the same athletic division as its greatest institutional threat. Southern and South Carolina State have in recent years flirted with the idea of moving down, but have never done it – even under terms of financial exigency. That Savannah State is preemptively working to avoid such a move, speaks volumes about the state of affairs at the school, and the threats it faces in the months and years to come.

JL Carter Sr.
Founding Editor, HBCUDigest.com


Online bluedog

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2017, 04:13:50 AM »
At Savannah State, It’s Much Bigger Than Moving Down to Division II

This should not be the typical conversation about HBCU athletics, the athletes they can’t recruit, the fans who don’t show up, the games we cannot win and the money we cannot make. Those discussions, and the umbrella conversations about the wisdom of competing at Division I are legitimate on both sides when it comes to scholarships, promotional opportunities, and visibility for institutions.

This is about the optics of opportunity in Georgia and states like it. No public HBCU in the state enrolls more students or is stationed in a more developed city than Savannah State University. It had long been on the radar of state legislators seeking to merge the school with a proximate PWI, but whispers of racism and the threat of federal litigation then and now spared the school from that measure.

By this time next year, the University System of Georgia will have completed its consolidation of Georgia Southern University and Armstrong State University. The new GSU will bring to Savannah a BCS-level athletics program, which during the 2015-16 season earned more than $18 million in revenues and $1.3 million in total profit.

Not bad for a mid-major program which moved to the BCS two years after Savannah State joined the Division I Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, and essentially doubled up SSU in total revenues.  With the consolidation, the former mid-major football powerhouse will grow its athletic brand in a strategic location; a stark contrast to SSU, which this week announced that it is considering moving down to the NCAA’s Division II.

Six years after moving to Division I and just over a year before Georgia Southern takes up real estate just nine miles from its campus, Savannah State realizes that it is too costly and not worth the struggle to maintain the membership – before a larger, better-resourced institution begins competition in the city in 2018.  Recruiting top-tier athletes will be virtually impossible. Savannah’s local media outlets in print and broadcast will be fully committed to GSU’s new digs and new potential.

And any hope SSU had at attracting corporate support and fan buy-in for its sports programs will be overrun by its new predominantly white neighbor.

But Georgia higher ed officials are seemingly content with allowing SSU to stand just long enough so that it can be outperformed athletically, academically and philanthropically by a nearby PWI with 20,000-plus students, a BCS football program and an endless supply of goodwill coming behind it.

It did not have to be this way. The USG could have just as easily consolidated Armstrong State into Savannah State in the same way it consolidated Darton State College into Albany State University. But because the Armstrong opposition lobby was too strong, and the Georgia Southern brand is big enough and diverse enough to avoid charges of limiting choice for minorities, it will flourish while Savannah State, seemingly, will wither.

From a strict sports perspective, there is a reason to applaud Savannah State for seeking out the same pressure valve Winston-Salem State University found in 2010. WSSU returned to the CIAA after a failed five-year tenure in the MEAC and won championships across the board while maintaining resonance with its fan base and the surrounding community.


In the last five years, several Division II HBCUs have been nationally-ranked in football, men’s and women’s basketball. The CIAA Basketball Tournament remains among the nation’s most viable college sports products, regardless of division. The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference has led the country in D-II football attendance for 14 straight years. On the surface, there appears to be room for optimism among Savannah State sports fans.

But from operational and cultural perspectives, the timing of this announcement could not be worse for the institution. GSU arrives with a BCS bandwagon gassed up and ready to go, while Savannah State signals to its stakeholders that the old stationwagon upon which campus excutives have been working to restore for the better part of a decade is only fit to drive to church services and cabarets.

And for Georgia taxpayers who doesn’t know the political or financial back stories of these schools, they’ll only see two vastly different cars ringing up miles for dramatically different reasons – at their expense.

This has long been the essence of the HBCU experiment in the latter part of the 20th century and into the 21st – do they grow smaller and excel at a few things through fiscal conservatism and strategic development? Or do they expand, pray for the best and expect the worse?

Today’s political climate defines smart finance as how much money can be cut instead of how much can be made. Racism, in the eyes of many white and far too many black constituents, falls into one of two piles – victimization or alternative facts. Officials gamed the system by allowing SSU to survive, but to do so against the fastest growing peer institution in the entire USG – all while many stakeholders dismissed as premature the doomsday prediction for Savannah State when word of the GSU-ASU consolidation became policy.

And now, SSU may not have enough money to remain even in the same athletic division as its greatest institutional threat. Southern and South Carolina State have in recent years flirted with the idea of moving down, but have never done it – even under terms of financial exigency. That Savannah State is preemptively working to avoid such a move, speaks volumes about the state of affairs at the school, and the threats it faces in the months and years to come.

JL Carter Sr.
Founding Editor, HBCUDigest.com



I swear this guy gets his information from the local barbershop and he's forever misstating the simplest things a sport writer or whatever should know.

There is no BCS  it's P5 and GSU won't be a member anytime soon and Southern never remotely thought or had a reason to consider moving down.

P5/G5 he should know the difference.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2017, 04:20:00 AM by bluedog »
BCFNC:1948,49,50,54,60,75,93,95,97,98,03
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Offline Conquero

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2017, 08:19:45 AM »
Well Bluedog,

When nearly 80% of your athletic budget is subsidized, and nearly 60% of that budget is on the back of students in athletic fees, I am not saying that moving down is the answer, but a discussion regarding division affiliation is appropriate. 

The author is correct about the bigger picture.  Georgia Southern in Savannah is going to essentially cripple the University.  Savannah State is in desperate need of a president with sharp business acumen and corporate experience to garner the dollars through corporate support and innovative fundraiser.  What we have now is a social worker posing as a President.  This is bad for the University. 

For Savannah State, the move to Division I, increased visibility, dramatically raised the student enrollment, profile, and drastically improved our non-black enrollment figures, resulting in a positive desegregative effect.  Savannah State went from around 5% non black to nearly 18% non-black. 

Offline Branj2

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2017, 09:55:24 AM »
At Savannah State, It’s Much Bigger Than Moving Down to Division II

This should not be the typical conversation about HBCU athletics, the athletes they can’t recruit, the fans who don’t show up, the games we cannot win and the money we cannot make. Those discussions, and the umbrella conversations about the wisdom of competing at Division I are legitimate on both sides when it comes to scholarships, promotional opportunities, and visibility for institutions.

This is about the optics of opportunity in Georgia and states like it. No public HBCU in the state enrolls more students or is stationed in a more developed city than Savannah State University. It had long been on the radar of state legislators seeking to merge the school with a proximate PWI, but whispers of racism and the threat of federal litigation then and now spared the school from that measure.

By this time next year, the University System of Georgia will have completed its consolidation of Georgia Southern University and Armstrong State University. The new GSU will bring to Savannah a BCS-level athletics program, which during the 2015-16 season earned more than $18 million in revenues and $1.3 million in total profit.

Not bad for a mid-major program which moved to the BCS two years after Savannah State joined the Division I Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, and essentially doubled up SSU in total revenues.  With the consolidation, the former mid-major football powerhouse will grow its athletic brand in a strategic location; a stark contrast to SSU, which this week announced that it is considering moving down to the NCAA’s Division II.

Six years after moving to Division I and just over a year before Georgia Southern takes up real estate just nine miles from its campus, Savannah State realizes that it is too costly and not worth the struggle to maintain the membership – before a larger, better-resourced institution begins competition in the city in 2018.  Recruiting top-tier athletes will be virtually impossible. Savannah’s local media outlets in print and broadcast will be fully committed to GSU’s new digs and new potential.

And any hope SSU had at attracting corporate support and fan buy-in for its sports programs will be overrun by its new predominantly white neighbor.

But Georgia higher ed officials are seemingly content with allowing SSU to stand just long enough so that it can be outperformed athletically, academically and philanthropically by a nearby PWI with 20,000-plus students, a BCS football program and an endless supply of goodwill coming behind it.

It did not have to be this way. The USG could have just as easily consolidated Armstrong State into Savannah State in the same way it consolidated Darton State College into Albany State University. But because the Armstrong opposition lobby was too strong, and the Georgia Southern brand is big enough and diverse enough to avoid charges of limiting choice for minorities, it will flourish while Savannah State, seemingly, will wither.

From a strict sports perspective, there is a reason to applaud Savannah State for seeking out the same pressure valve Winston-Salem State University found in 2010. WSSU returned to the CIAA after a failed five-year tenure in the MEAC and won championships across the board while maintaining resonance with its fan base and the surrounding community.


In the last five years, several Division II HBCUs have been nationally-ranked in football, men’s and women’s basketball. The CIAA Basketball Tournament remains among the nation’s most viable college sports products, regardless of division. The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference has led the country in D-II football attendance for 14 straight years. On the surface, there appears to be room for optimism among Savannah State sports fans.

But from operational and cultural perspectives, the timing of this announcement could not be worse for the institution. GSU arrives with a BCS bandwagon gassed up and ready to go, while Savannah State signals to its stakeholders that the old stationwagon upon which campus excutives have been working to restore for the better part of a decade is only fit to drive to church services and cabarets.

And for Georgia taxpayers who doesn’t know the political or financial back stories of these schools, they’ll only see two vastly different cars ringing up miles for dramatically different reasons – at their expense.

This has long been the essence of the HBCU experiment in the latter part of the 20th century and into the 21st – do they grow smaller and excel at a few things through fiscal conservatism and strategic development? Or do they expand, pray for the best and expect the worse?

Today’s political climate defines smart finance as how much money can be cut instead of how much can be made. Racism, in the eyes of many white and far too many black constituents, falls into one of two piles – victimization or alternative facts. Officials gamed the system by allowing SSU to survive, but to do so against the fastest growing peer institution in the entire USG – all while many stakeholders dismissed as premature the doomsday prediction for Savannah State when word of the GSU-ASU consolidation became policy.

And now, SSU may not have enough money to remain even in the same athletic division as its greatest institutional threat. Southern and South Carolina State have in recent years flirted with the idea of moving down, but have never done it – even under terms of financial exigency. That Savannah State is preemptively working to avoid such a move, speaks volumes about the state of affairs at the school, and the threats it faces in the months and years to come.

JL Carter Sr.
Founding Editor, HBCUDigest.com



This article is poorly written at best.
Jackson State Tigers 2007 SWAC Champions

Notre Dame Fighting Irish 2005 BCS(Fiesta Bowl)

Hoover Bucs 2000,2002 6A State Champions

2009 AFL2 American Conference Champions WB Scranton Pioneers

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Online bluedog

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2017, 12:42:21 PM »
At Savannah State, It’s Much Bigger Than Moving Down to Division II

This should not be the typical conversation about HBCU athletics, the athletes they can’t recruit, the fans who don’t show up, the games we cannot win and the money we cannot make. Those discussions, and the umbrella conversations about the wisdom of competing at Division I are legitimate on both sides when it comes to scholarships, promotional opportunities, and visibility for institutions.

This is about the optics of opportunity in Georgia and states like it. No public HBCU in the state enrolls more students or is stationed in a more developed city than Savannah State University. It had long been on the radar of state legislators seeking to merge the school with a proximate PWI, but whispers of racism and the threat of federal litigation then and now spared the school from that measure.

By this time next year, the University System of Georgia will have completed its consolidation of Georgia Southern University and Armstrong State University. The new GSU will bring to Savannah a BCS-level athletics program, which during the 2015-16 season earned more than $18 million in revenues and $1.3 million in total profit.

Not bad for a mid-major program which moved to the BCS two years after Savannah State joined the Division I Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, and essentially doubled up SSU in total revenues.  With the consolidation, the former mid-major football powerhouse will grow its athletic brand in a strategic location; a stark contrast to SSU, which this week announced that it is considering moving down to the NCAA’s Division II.

Six years after moving to Division I and just over a year before Georgia Southern takes up real estate just nine miles from its campus, Savannah State realizes that it is too costly and not worth the struggle to maintain the membership – before a larger, better-resourced institution begins competition in the city in 2018.  Recruiting top-tier athletes will be virtually impossible. Savannah’s local media outlets in print and broadcast will be fully committed to GSU’s new digs and new potential.

And any hope SSU had at attracting corporate support and fan buy-in for its sports programs will be overrun by its new predominantly white neighbor.

But Georgia higher ed officials are seemingly content with allowing SSU to stand just long enough so that it can be outperformed athletically, academically and philanthropically by a nearby PWI with 20,000-plus students, a BCS football program and an endless supply of goodwill coming behind it.

It did not have to be this way. The USG could have just as easily consolidated Armstrong State into Savannah State in the same way it consolidated Darton State College into Albany State University. But because the Armstrong opposition lobby was too strong, and the Georgia Southern brand is big enough and diverse enough to avoid charges of limiting choice for minorities, it will flourish while Savannah State, seemingly, will wither.

From a strict sports perspective, there is a reason to applaud Savannah State for seeking out the same pressure valve Winston-Salem State University found in 2010. WSSU returned to the CIAA after a failed five-year tenure in the MEAC and won championships across the board while maintaining resonance with its fan base and the surrounding community.


In the last five years, several Division II HBCUs have been nationally-ranked in football, men’s and women’s basketball. The CIAA Basketball Tournament remains among the nation’s most viable college sports products, regardless of division. The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference has led the country in D-II football attendance for 14 straight years. On the surface, there appears to be room for optimism among Savannah State sports fans.

But from operational and cultural perspectives, the timing of this announcement could not be worse for the institution. GSU arrives with a BCS bandwagon gassed up and ready to go, while Savannah State signals to its stakeholders that the old stationwagon upon which campus excutives have been working to restore for the better part of a decade is only fit to drive to church services and cabarets.

And for Georgia taxpayers who doesn’t know the political or financial back stories of these schools, they’ll only see two vastly different cars ringing up miles for dramatically different reasons – at their expense.

This has long been the essence of the HBCU experiment in the latter part of the 20th century and into the 21st – do they grow smaller and excel at a few things through fiscal conservatism and strategic development? Or do they expand, pray for the best and expect the worse?

Today’s political climate defines smart finance as how much money can be cut instead of how much can be made. Racism, in the eyes of many white and far too many black constituents, falls into one of two piles – victimization or alternative facts. Officials gamed the system by allowing SSU to survive, but to do so against the fastest growing peer institution in the entire USG – all while many stakeholders dismissed as premature the doomsday prediction for Savannah State when word of the GSU-ASU consolidation became policy.

And now, SSU may not have enough money to remain even in the same athletic division as its greatest institutional threat. Southern and South Carolina State have in recent years flirted with the idea of moving down, but have never done it – even under terms of financial exigency. That Savannah State is preemptively working to avoid such a move, speaks volumes about the state of affairs at the school, and the threats it faces in the months and years to come.

JL Carter Sr.
Founding Editor, HBCUDigest.com



This article is poorly written at best.

Extremely
BCFNC:1948,49,50,54,60,75,93,95,97,98,03
SWAC Champs: 1937,38,40,46,47,48,49,50,55,59,60,66,75,93,97,98,99,03,13
Bowl Appearances:11 record 8-3 Heritage Bowl 4 - 2

Online bluedog

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2017, 12:46:07 PM »
Well Bluedog,

When nearly 80% of your athletic budget is subsidized, and nearly 60% of that budget is on the back of students in athletic fees, I am not saying that moving down is the answer, but a discussion regarding division affiliation is appropriate.  

The author is correct about the bigger picture.  Georgia Southern in Savannah is going to essentially cripple the University.  Savannah State is in desperate need of a president with sharp business acumen and corporate experience to garner the dollars through corporate support and innovative fundraiser.  What we have now is a social worker posing as a President.  This is bad for the University.  

For Savannah State, the move to Division I, increased visibility, dramatically raised the student enrollment, profile, and drastically improved our non-black enrollment figures, resulting in a positive desegregative effect.  Savannah State went from around 5% non black to nearly 18% non-black.  


And just what does any of that have to do with my complaint about the article and the author constant inaccuracies?
« Last Edit: April 15, 2017, 02:42:18 PM by bluedog »
BCFNC:1948,49,50,54,60,75,93,95,97,98,03
SWAC Champs: 1937,38,40,46,47,48,49,50,55,59,60,66,75,93,97,98,99,03,13
Bowl Appearances:11 record 8-3 Heritage Bowl 4 - 2

Offline SkegeeFAMU

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2017, 06:36:28 PM »
:clap:  Best wishes!   :clap:  I hope this works out to shut the naysayers up. 

Good luck to SSU!!!
Tuskegee University- Continuing the Relentless Pursuit of Excellence!!

Offline thatd@mnYOGI

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2017, 08:51:10 PM »
I am not going to entertain that narrative by the HBCUDigest. They lost credibility with me when they started naming Georgia Southern a BCS school. Obviously, they didn't bother to do their research. There are no BCS. They are either Power 5 or FBS.

Again, whatever decision our Orange Cousins decide, I will be happy for them. I will be happier if they return back to the SIAC. I miss our home-to-home back in the day. It's sad that the current students from either school don't know nor understand the history and the rivalry between both schools. I miss those two hour drives to Savannah.

that's all...

Offline y04185

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Re: Alumni ready to fight for SSU to stay in Division I
« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2017, 09:02:12 PM »
They may as well go back to D2.  The alumni might give now.  They won't keep it up.  After they have gotten over with their feelings it will be business as usual.  The athletic department won't hire enough staff to get enough corporate sponsors to sustain athletics at any level. 
Fayetteville State by choice. Bronco by the Grace of GOD.

 

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