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Topics - akaree16

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1


FORT VALLEY, Ga. – The new Wildcats tireless football staff never stop the recruiting trail. With the first of six late-spring incoming players, Fort Valley State announces the signing of Emanuel Wilson, one of the top 20 running backs of the 2019 NCAA Division II season.
 
After rushing onto the scene in his hometown Charlotte, N.C. for Johnson C. Smith University last fall, Wilson entered the NCAA transfer portal in hopes of finding a new home and found one in The Valley.

https://fvsusports.com/news/2020/5/25/football-wildcats-announces-signing-of-one-of-top-ncaa-dii-backs-emanuel-wilson.aspx

2
Sports Forum / FVSU’s Jarman and Harris Name SIAC Players of the Year
« on: November 22, 2019, 08:07:21 PM »


The Wildcats boast the two best conference players voted upon by the league members. Fort Valley State quarterback Slade Jarman earned the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football Player of the Year and Offensive Player of the Year, while defensive end Demetrius Harris received the Defensive Player of the Year award to highlight the team's honorees.
The SIAC's top passing offense was led by Jarman, which the senior quarterback received the top honors of Player of the Year, Offensive Player of the Year and All-SIAC First Team. The three-time SIAC Offensive Player of the Week and once named the BOXTOROW National Player of the Week ranked within NCAA Division II's Top 15 in eight different offensive categories when he unfortunately suffered a season-ending injury in the start of the third quarter of week eight's game. Jarman led the SIAC in passing yards per game (262.2 yds/gm) and set his personal best numbers of 174 completions in 281 attempts for 2,099 yards with 18 touchdowns to five interceptions for a 61.9-percent and a 142.25 pass efficiency rating. The Pensacola, Fla., native also rushed 123 yards on 74 carries with six touchdowns.
https://fvsusports.com/news/2019/11/21/jarman-player-of-the-year-and-harris-defensive-player-of-the-year-highlight-wildcats-siac-football-honors.aspx

3
Sports Forum / Rude welcome for Tigers in SIAC preseason poll
« on: July 09, 2019, 09:29:48 PM »
Savannah State’s return season to the SIAC is not expected to be very successful, according to the league’s coaches and sports information directors.

Not only was Savannah State predicted to place 6th, the Tigers also have no players selected to the Preseason All-SIAC First or Second Teams.
“We’re not picked very well or any of that stuff. Great!” laughs head coach Shawn Quinn. "I’m just glad they’re going to let us line up and hopefully they’ll let us have 11 and maybe even wear helmets.”
 :lmao:
https://www.wtoc.com/2019/07/09/rude-welcome-tigers-siac-preseason-poll/

4


Students at Fort Valley State University soon may be getting hands-on experience with solar technology. Fort Valley State University (FVSU) announced that Georgia Power will develop and construct an 11 megawatts (MWac), fixed-tilt solar generation facility located on the FVSU campus. It will serve as a living laboratory for FVSU professors and students who will help to build Georgia’s energy future. The solar farm will cover approximately 107 acres of land owned by the university. When completed, it will be one of the largest solar operations stationed on a college campus in the United States.

https://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/news/2019/05/13/georgia-power-planning-solar-demonstration-project.html
https://www.fvsu.edu/news/fort-valley-state-university-and-georgia-power-announce-solar-initiative/

5


SACSCOC’s June 2018 action helps fuel the university’s evolution into the “college of the future”


(Fort Valley, GA)– The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) removed the warning issued to Fort Valley State University (FVSU) in June 2017 during its Board of Trustees meeting on June 14, 2018. The action was made public by SACSCOC yesterday evening.

“Fort Valley State University has proven its strong positioning for a bright future,” said Paul Jones, Ph.D., president. “We are engineering the college of the future and preparing our students for careers as change agents in fields and industries never before envisioned. This action by SACSCOC is a vote of confidence in our solid financial controls, student support systems, and instructional foundation as we prepare to evolve into a unique model of effectiveness in student academic growth and professional development.”

During the past two years, FVSU has significantly strengthened its operational efficiency and ability to deliver robust and relevant academic and co-curricular programming through the implementation of new technology, reporting processes, authorization procedures, and new leadership in audit, compliance, budget, financial aid, performance measurement, and student affairs roles. Over the two years, enrollment has increased by more than 2.7% and student residence halls occupancy has increased to 98%. The athletic programs have eliminated an annual deficit, and at the same time, the university has greatly enhanced private fundraising and communications capacity. FVSU’s most recent independent audit was returned with no new findings.

About Fort Valley State University

Founded in 1895, Fort Valley State University, a University System of Georgia institution, is one of the nation’s most innovative and affordable academic institutions. Leveraging its unique role as an 1890 land-grant institution, the college conducts more science, technology, engineering and math federal research than any other public teaching college in the state of Georgia, making curriculum-enhancing research opportunities available to students learning to be leaders in innovation. The university’s undergraduate and graduate campus and online degree programs enroll almost 3,000 students from all over the world. Named the most affordable online school in the nation for student economic mobility, the university has produced more African Americans with mathematics degrees than any other college in the nation in two of the past four years. FVSU students participate in more than 80 academic and civic organizations, honor societies and study abroad programs. FVSU is a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and NCAA Division II League.

http://www.fvsu.edu/news/full-speed-ahead-accreditation-warning-lifted-from-fort-valley-state-university/

6
Sports Forum / The Wildcats are down to two full-time paid coaches
« on: June 18, 2015, 11:55:11 AM »
WILDCATS STILL BATTLING

A 6-4 season isn’t bad, but Fort Valley State still wasn’t happy that mark in 2014.

But winning records are getting tougher to come by at FVSU with a constantly dwindling staff.

The Wildcats are down to two full-time paid coaches, and one of them was at the Pigskin Preview.

Offensive line coach Keith DeGrate went to FVSU with head coach Donald Pittman, and while they no doubt expected to stay colleagues, they no doubt expected to have more than each other.

“Get up earlier,” DeGrate said, “and go home later.”

The Wildcats have made do with a list of volunteer coaches since the cuts started in full less than two months after FVSU’s playoff season of 2012 had ended. Finances haven’t been good on campus for years, and the school is yet again looking for a president.

The football staff lost one of its veterans when longtime defensive coach Terry Jones left to take a high school head coaching position in his home state of Oklahoma.

DeGrate said there are six bodies working with the team, but those volunteers aren’t fully vested in the other parts of the job, like recruiting, strength and conditioning, academics and player development.

Still, DeGrate thinks the Wildcats let two or three games get a away last season.

“We shouldn’t have lost three football games, that’s for sure,” he said. “Those four turnovers against Albany State killed us.

“But injuries played a big part on the last three ballgames. We don’t have the depth because we don’t have the funds to go get the kids.”

Read more here: http://www.macon.com/2015/06/02/3777111/pigskin-preview-notebook-b-back.html#storylink=cpy

7
Sports Forum / Donald Pittman makes excuses in loss to Delta State
« on: September 07, 2014, 12:26:10 PM »
Quarterback Tyler Sullivan threw for three touchdowns and ran for another as Delta State dismantled Fort Valley State with its high-powered offense 56-13 on Saturday.

Sullivan threw for 258 yards before taking a seat in the third quarter, while receiver Casey Osborne had three touchdown catches among his 12 receptions on the day.

“I am not a coach that makes excuses very often, but after this game I am,” said Fort Valley State head coach Donald Pittman, who was very upbeat afterward despite the loss. “Delta State had a week and a half more practice than us, they have more scholarship players than we have, which is a huge advantage on a hot day.

“And we had six players that took repetitions during the week and they weren’t able to play with us this week, and that hurt. All of those guys will be back next week.

“I told my guys that we are going to stand tall after this and get to work to become a better football team.”

Things actually started off on a positive note. The Wildcats took the opening kickoff and drove 77 yards on six plays and scored on a Malcolm Eady 1-yard run. The big play on the drive was an Eady pass to Brian Walker that covered 65 yards. But that would be the end of the offensive highlights for the day.

After exchanging punts, the Statesmen started to dominate. Taking advantage of great field position, they scored the next three times they were on offense.

The first drive covered 58 yards, with the touchdown coming on a pass from Sullivan to Osborne from 4 yards out. After a Wildcats fumble, Delta State took four plays to cover 25 yards, with Sullivan hitting Justin Leavy for a 12-yard score. After a three-and-out by the Wildcats, the Statesmen went 40 yards on five plays, with Sullivan scoring from 4 yards out to take a commanding 21-6 lead after a quarter of action.

Fort Valley State, which lost starting running back Jonquez Sanders early in the game, was unable to get anything going, and Delta State added two more touchdowns in the second quarter, both on short runs by Timothy Foy, to take a 35-6 lead into the break.

“We did not really get anything going on offense, and losing Jonquez hurt our running game, because we really thought that he was the guy who was going to carry a heavy load,” Pittman said. “I thought we would be better running the football, but they got penetration for most of the game, and obviously we have to put more of an emphasis on running the football.”

Delta State tacked on three more touchdowns to make it 56-6 before Fort Valley scored midway through the fourth quarter on a 6- yard pass from Otis Brown to Bolden Davis.

http://www.macon.com/2014/09/06/3291123/delta-state-overcomes-early-fvsu.html?sp=/99/160/165/171/

8
Sports Forum / FVSU starts new Wildcat Coaches Show
« on: September 05, 2014, 08:33:43 PM »


Wildcat fans and sports enthusiasts can snack on hot wings, sandwiches and other treats while watching Wildcat coaches discuss game day highlights and future strategies during a new show that will be televised live in a downtown Fort Valley restaurant. 

Starting Tuesday, Sept. 9, Fort Valley State University will be launching the Fort Valley State University Coaches Show featuring Donald Pittman. The show, which will be hosted by WMAZ sports anchor Marvin Jones, will be filmed at the Main Street Grill in downtown Fort Valley, Ga. on Tuesdays at noon. It will air on Thursday nights at 10 p.m., and Friday nights at 6 p.m. On ComSouth Channel 100.

Read more at: http://review.fvsu.edu/content/fvsu-starts-new-wildcat-coaches-show

9
Sports Forum / Division II teams could form strong conference
« on: July 04, 2014, 08:07:43 PM »
On Tuesday, we saw an addition to the ACC the same day the conference lost one of its founding members. And we saw the Southern Conference lose four programs and replace them with three.

Louisville joined the ACC officially Tuesday to replace Maryland, which jumped to the Big Ten. While it hurts to lose a founding member, that’s a win for the ACC considering Maryland hasn’t been relevant in anything for some time, while Louisville in recent years has won a basketball national title and a BCS bowl game while also reaching the College World Series.

The Southern Conference lost Georgia Southern, Appalachian State, Elon and Davidson, while Mercer, East Tennessee State and VMI moved into the conference. Some question Georgia Southern’s move up to the FBS and the Sun Belt, but as long as Eagles fans adjust their goals, that’s a solid step up for the program. Mercer’s move is also an overall positive, although the Bears left a terrific mid-major conference in the A-Sun.

It was yet another day of the process of realignment, which has ruled over college athletics for the past few years. Hopefully, that is about to come to an end, although it would be nice to see a little more realignment -- right here in our state on a smaller level.

The constant movement of the past few years has totally changed the Division I level -- and who knows what changes are about to come in regards to player payments. But the changes haven’t hit the Division II level on a large scale yet, although the Gulf South Conference did lose several of its western programs recently.

Before they are forced to make changes, it would be wise for the Division II programs in our state to be proactive and make moves to build their own conference and their own brand. And it could be a heck of a conference and a heck of a brand.

Just start with the football-playing programs: Albany State, Clark Atlanta, Fort Valley State, Morehouse, Paine, Shorter, West Georgia and Valdosta State. That’s a terrific start with eight pretty good athletics programs all right here in the state.

On the playing fields and courts, it makes sense because it would be a solid level of play in most sports. Off the fields and courts, it makes sense because there would be almost zero travel, which saves money. There also would be natural rivalries, which would build attention for the conference and get fans invested in games against one another. That makes money.

And we all know this is all about money.

But if eight programs aren’t enough to form a full conference, there are others to choose from (although football would be stuck at eight). There are many other Division II programs in the state for other sports, which could add depth and quality to the conference. That includes Georgia College, Armstrong Atlantic, Clayton State, Columbus State, Georgia Regents, Georgia Southwestern and North Georgia.

Any of those -- or all of them -- would be good choices to build a conference right here in the state and would give their students and fans something strong to cheer for and against.

It’s probably a long shot, mainly because the Gulf South Conference programs (Shorter, West Georgia and Valdosta) are tied to one of the strongest Division II conferences around, and it makes sense for them to stay put. Also, the SIAC programs (Albany State, Clark Atlanta, Fort Valley State, Morehouse and Paine) have longstanding ties to their conference that would be difficult to break, both for their leadership and fan bases.

Plus, the Peach Belt Conference is a terrific conference and has been for years.

Still, a new Division II conference focusing on state programs would be forward thinking and be a huge positive for everyone involved with very few negatives. That sounds like something everyone could invest in to be a terrific move for all the schools, their leadership groups and their fans.

Read more here: http://www.macon.com/2014/07/04/3182501/division-ii-teams-could-form-strong.html#storylink=cpy

10
t’s been four months since Ivelaw Griffith took the helm of Fort Valley State University, and he has encountered his share of obstacles. There are retention and graduation issues, financial challenges and a decline in enrollment.

While historically black colleges and universities across the nation face similar problems, Griffith argues those issues are not necessarily limited to HBCUs but are plaguing many colleges across the country. Still, the new president has a strategy, and he said he has already begun implementing that plan.

“These issues are not unique to HBCUs ... grappling with leadership challenges and enrollment challenges, those are across the board issues,” he said.

In Fort Valley State’s case, enrollment has increased compared to a decade ago, but it has steadily declined over the past few years. Enrollment dropped nearly 11 percent from 3,568 students in fall 2012 to 3,180 students in fall 2013, according to the University System of Georgia.

Retention and graduation numbers also need a boost, Griffith said. From fall 2011 to fall 2012, about 58 percent of new, full-time students continued their studies at the university. About 22 percent of part-time students returned. The overall graduation rate was 29 percent for students who began college in 2006, according to the most recent data from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Those figures pale in comparison to the nationwide rates.

In 2010, the average retention rate for full-time students at all institutions was 72 percent. The average rate for part-time students was 44 percent. In 2011, the average graduation rate for full-time, first-time students nationwide was 59 percent, according to a report by the National Center for Education Statistics.

“We have an unacceptably low rate of retention. We have an unacceptably low rate of graduation,” Griffith said.

He is making changes in the enrollment management division and has plans to amp up customer service. One of those plans simply involves name tags. Employees, even the president, will wear identification badges, so current and future students will not only know who they’re talking to but know the specific person to compliment or complain about, Griffith said.

Additionally, Griffith wants not only to bring in more students but more advanced students. He is implementing an undergraduate research program, giving research opportunities to students beginning their freshman years. Griffith plans to seek funding for such programs instead of relying solely on individual professors to get research grants, he said.

Furthermore, he will soon establish an honors program, which will not only be an academic tool but also a recruitment tool, he said.

“We are going to be intentionally recruiting students for honors,” he said.

International students

Another plan might be a controversial one, Griffith said. He wants to open the door for more international students, particularly Hispanic students, to attend FVSU. Not only will it make the campus more diverse and give international students a quality education, but it will bring much-needed revenue to the university, he said. Griffith plans to travel to South America on behalf of the university in January.

“How do we get international students who can pay their own way and get companies that can (financially) help them?” he asked. “We need those out-of-state and out-of-country dollars, and we need to broaden the types of students here.”

Finances are a hardship for FVSU and for institutions across the nation.

Griffith has rehired a director of development, a position that was cut to save money but one Griffith argues is needed to run financial campaigns.

While he intends to request a larger amount of state dollars compared to the previous year, Griffith also realizes FVSU can no longer rely on state money.

“I’m not looking only for the state to give us money,” Griffith said. “I’m going to beat the doors of corporations. I’m going to beat the doors of alumni. ... We’ve got to have an all-access approach to fundraising.”

Still, there are some problems facing other institutions that Fort Valley State has under control. For example, while some facilities are aged and need updating, overall FVSU has “wonderful facilities,” Griffith said.

Over the past seven years, about $185 million was pumped into new academic buildings, residence halls, a new stadium and several refurbished structures.

But some buildings still are in need of repairs. Carnegie Hall, for example, will begin renovations in January to house the new honors program, Griffith said.

“I’m not in the business of whining and complaining and looking back,” he said. “I’m in the business of looking forward and making a difference.”

Read more here: http://www.macon.com/2013/12/08/2822755/new-fvsu-president-implements.html#storylink=cpy

11

The college that sits just across the railroad tracks in this small town saved Larry Rivers’ life.

That’s one reason, perhaps the biggest reason, why Rivers wanted to become president of the institution. Now, as his resignation becomes official Sunday, the former president of Fort Valley State University reflects on seven years of leadership, which have been marked by many accomplishments and some challenges.

Some of the biggest accomplishments are the most visible ones. Under Rivers, about $185 million was pumped into new academic and activity buildings, new residence halls, a new stadium and a slew of refurbished buildings -- some of which were boarded-up eyesores when Rivers arrived as president.

Then there’s the sharp increase in enrollment. There are new programs and a partnership with the city, which has fostered new roads and a stronger downtown presence. There was accreditation for the College of Education and reaffirmation of the university’s overall accreditation for 10 years.

There was a push to revive FVSU’s financial health, a goal that was achieved, but not easily. A balanced budget came at the price of employee furloughs, which caused a heap of controversy.

And while finances are stable and alumni giving has increased, fundraising has been a challenge, especially when it comes to sports. It’s a challenge that, if not overcome, could have a devastating effect on FVSU athletics and the university as a whole, Rivers said.

Still, the former president has faith in the students and alumni of the university that has been an important part of his life. Rivers is leaving to pursue his first love of teaching and research. He will teach history at Valdosta State University. He originally planned to serve as president for five years, he said, but stayed on for two more.

“It’s good to leave when you’re in a good position,” he said. “I believe I’m leaving a solid university to the incoming president.”

Ivelaw Griffith, former provost of York College of the City University of New York, takes the helm July 22.

‘I wanted to return’

Born near West Philadelphia, Rivers had begun drifting toward the wrong crowd when his aunt suggested he attend what was then Fort Valley State College. In his sophomore year, Rivers decided he would one day return to the college -- as president. If he had stayed in Philadelphia with the wrong group of friends, Rivers is certain he would have ended up hurt or in trouble.

“Fort Valley saved my life, and I wanted to return to do what I could to help Fort Valley State,” he said.

His high school teachers showed Rivers the importance of educators, and he decided to make his career in higher education. He was an adjunct professor at The University of Pittsburgh and held faculty and administrative positions at Florida A&M University before vying for the top role at FVSU in 2006.

Ira Hicks, a retired professor of agriculture education, was a professor at FVSU while Rivers was a student. Even though he never taught Rivers, Hicks knew of Rivers as an outgoing, determined young man. Hicks said he was thrilled when a former student was named president.

“I’ve been here with every president, all eight of them,” Hicks said. “In some instances, he surpassed everybody.”

When he returned to Fort Valley, Rivers immediately began reaching out to the community and to the students. Rivers and his wife, Betty, attended 42 churches that first year, good places to not only meet people but also promote the university.

Enrollment increased from 2,176 students in fall 2006 -- the semester before Rivers arrived -- to 3,193 by spring 2013. Enrollment increased each academic year of Rivers’ tenure until it peaked at 3,896 students in fall 2011, according to the University System of Georgia. Enrollment has since dipped, following a trend of decreasing enrollment in colleges across the state and the nation.

‘A great connection’

Students always have been a priority, Rivers says. He grins as he recalls students introducing him to their parents, many of whom were shocked that the university president wanted to meet them. He remembers asking male students to wear ties on certain days of the week. It wasn’t a mandatory dress code but a way to teach them how to dress professionally. Many of the young men participated, and Rivers often gave ties to students who didn’t have any.

“The campus, it’s just different,” Hicks said. “Student morale is just about as high as we’ve had it.”

Rashad Robertson remembers Rivers running with students on the campus track.

“He would even come into the cafeteria and eat food with us,” said Robertson, Student Government Association president. “He really had a great connection to the student body. He wasn’t that political figure that most presidents seem to be.”

When he returned to campus as president, Rivers donated $100,000 to the scholarship foundation -- a gesture he hoped other alumni would mimic. And it worked. Alumni giving has increased from 4 percent to 17 percent, though Rivers says there is room for much improvement.

‘Hard decisions’

In fact, finances were at the top of Rivers to-do list at FVSU. When he took the job, he inherited some debt. The university had a $2.5 million deficit when he took office, and it had a $3 million deficit the year before, he said. Rivers worked to climb out of that hole, and from that point on, the university had a balanced budget and good audits, he said.

“I said, ‘If the state of Georgia can balance its budget, doggone it, Fort Valley State can balance a budget,’ ” he recalled.

But financial health came at a cost. Rivers eliminated some unproductive, costly programs, and many instructors had to pick up some extra classes. To avoid layoffs, Rivers enforced three-day faculty furloughs, a move that prompted 12 members of the faculty senate to issue a no-confidence vote in Rivers. He was out of town when the vote was taken.

When Rivers returned, he took his case to the entire faculty, and 87 percent voted to rescind the vote, stating they had confidence in his leadership.

“I did not want to lay off anyone at that time,” Rivers said, adding he would have been forced to lay off the lower paid employees who were scraping by on $7 or $8 an hour.

“I had to do furlough days to balance the budget. ... I made some hard decisions.”

And there were other issues Rivers encountered when coming to FVSU, particularly the appearance of campus. Old buildings were falling apart, the floors rotting and the windows boarded. The surrounding neighborhood was run down, with about 50 condemned houses.

About $185 million was pumped into capital projects during Rivers’ tenure, money that was garnered through bonds. The old buildings were renovated. Through a partnership with the city, a majority of those homes were demolished, and officials snagged a grant to improve the road along campus.

“We have had an incredible journey together. He has done an incredible job,” Fort Valley Mayor John Stumbo said. “He invented the term ‘communiversity,’ and it signifies that partnership we have had between the community and the university.”

‘I am very concerned’

Several other capital projects have been completed, including a new stadium. The stadium -- along with increased competition and reduced ticket prices -- was part of a push to increase attendance at home games.

But attendance and funds continue to wane, and Rivers is concerned for the future of FVSU athletics. If it continues on this path, the athletics program could drop to Division III or be cut altogether, Rivers said.

“I think it will have a devastating effect on our programs,” Rivers said. “I believe academics and athletics go hand in hand. ... But I am very concerned about where we’re going.”

Adding to the problem is a lack of alumni contributions and a new rule passed by the Board of Regents, which prohibits the university from using other auxiliary funds to give athletics a boost. Rivers has tried to garner outside funding, but it’s difficult to persuade businesses to donate when a majority of the alumni do not give, he said.

It’s a problem Rivers hopes the next president can solve, starting with hiring a top-notch athletics director, he said.

Rivers suggested the new president meet a cross-section of the campus and local community, develop a relationship with the city, concentrate on retention and graduation, prepare himself to make tough decisions, review unproductive programs and consider new programs. Rivers supports a doctor of veterinary medicine program with a focus on large animals and an allied health sciences program, he said.

As a new leader comes in and Rivers prepares to leave, he will miss the university where his career came full circle.

“But mostly, I’m going to miss the students,” he said.

Read more here: http://www.macon.com/2013/06/29/2538768/rivers-steps-down-after-seven.html#storylink=cpy

12


Phyllis Dawkins knows what it’s like to build up a college.

As provost of Dillard University in New Orleans, Dawkins was instrumental in jump-starting several new programs and reaffirming accreditation for the university. Now, Dawkins has plans for Fort Valley State University as she vies to be its next president.

The Asheville, N.C., native kicked off a week of presidential candidate forums at the university, where four candidates will state their case for leading the institution. The position will be vacated when President Larry Rivers steps down June 30.

“This is an opportunity to make a difference,” Dawkins said after the event.

That difference includes concentrating on enrollment, retention and graduation rates; responding to economic challenges; and balancing the university’s budget, among other goals.

She also highlighted plans to increase enrollment and assist students. She focused on bringing new, relevant programs to the university; expanding internships and study abroad programs; bringing in more international students; and reaching out to current students -- particularly new students. Dawkins has a history of building programs to assist freshmen and sophomores, she said.

“I’m really big on making sure that in the first two years students are grounded, and we capture them in terms of retention,” she said.

She discussed building a strong strategic plan, working to meet the university’s goals and being fiscally responsible. That includes monitoring tuition, securing clean financial audits, managing debt services, fundraising and increasing communication with alumni.

A big portion of financial stability is snagging grants, and Dawkins wants to make sure as many faculty as possible are proficient grant writers, she said. Dawkins has proposed and received grants totaling more than $28 million at Dillard and Johnson C. Smith universities.

She hopes to create a culture in which faculty are “not just relying on university resources but writing grants as a group,” she said.

When it comes to working with faculty, Dawkins calls herself a participator. As the former president of a faculty senate, “I like to operate through the faculty senate and the faculty to accomplish common goals for the university.”

Dawkins has worked extensively with faculty development, according to her biography. She has held several roles at both Johnson C. Smith University and Dillard University, where she is provost, vice president of academic affairs and professor of psychology and education. She has degrees from Johnson C. Smith University, University of Michigan and Ohio State University.

Several employees at the forum wanted to know what impact she would make at FVSU. As a major agricultural college, some wanted to know what her goals would be in terms of agriculture programs.

Dawkins said she would look into expanding the school’s cooperative programs. She plans to visit surrounding counties, determining their needs and then growing those programs. She also emphasized expanding research and grant writing.

“I didn’t think she was speaking in haste in order to just give answers. She thought about what the questions were,” said James Brown, interim assistant dean for academic programs in the College of Agriculture, Family Sciences and Technology. “She was not speaking prematurely on things.”

Faculty also wanted to know how Dawkins would prioritize athletics needs. Dawkins emphasized the need for athletics in terms of student engagement, “but academic programs should not suffer because of athletics. But I think they can coexist,” she said. “I am a big proponent of athletics.”

The next candidate to speak will be Sandra Westbrooks, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Chicago State University, at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the C.W. Pettigrew Center at Fort Valley State.

Daniel K. Wims -- provost, vice president for academic affairs and professor of agricultural sciences at Alabama A&M University -- and Ivelaw Griffith -- provost, senior vice president and professor of political science at York College of The City University of New York -- will speak Thursday and Monday, respectively.

To contact writer Jenna Mink, call 256-9751.


Read more here: http://www.macon.com/2013/05/28/2496087/first-of-four-fvsu-presidential.html#storylink=cpy

13
A committee has selected four candidates in its search for the next president of Fort Valley State University, and the public is invited to hear them state their case for leading the university.

Larry Rivers plans to step down as the university’s president June 30. A search and screen committee chose the finalists, who will now be reviewed by University System of Georgia Chancellor Hank Huckaby and Larry Ellis, chairman of the Special Regents’ Search Committee. Huckaby and Ellis will then make a recommendation to the Board of Regents, which will choose the university’s ninth president, according to a news release.

The process of selecting the finalists has been arduous, committee chairwoman Meigan Fields said in the statement.

“The efforts and the level of time and seriousness of commitment provided by this group speak volumes to their professionalism and dedication to FVSU,” she said.

The finalists are:

• Phyllis Worthy Daw-kins, provost, senior vice president for academic affairs and professor of education and psychology at Dillard University in New Orleans.

• Sandra Westbrooks, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Chicago State University.

• Daniel K. Wims, provost, vice president for academic affairs and professor of agricultural sciences at Alabama A&M University.

• Ivelaw Griffith, provost, senior vice president and professor of political science at York College of The City University of New York.

The finalists will speak in the C.W. Pettigrew Center at 3:30 p.m. beginning next week. Dawkins will speak May 28; Westbrooks will speak May 29; Wims will speak May 30, and Griffith will speak June 3.

To contact writer Jenna Mink, call 256-9751.


Read more here: http://www.macon.com/2013/05/21/2487452/short-list-for-fvsu-presidential.html#storylink=cpy

14


A group with ties to Fort Valley State University promises their new book will help the nation’s historically black colleges and universities thrive. “A New Life for Historically Black Colleges and Universities: a 21st Century Perspective,” recently published by McFarland Press, identifies challenges that HBCUs are currently facing, and provides strategies to overcome them.
Eight FVSU faculty and former FVSU administrators authored portions of the book. The collaboration includes Women’s Center director Juone Brown, history faculty members Drs. Meigan Fields, Dawn J. Herd-Clark and Komanduri S. Murty, and former FVSU administrators Drs. Vann Newkirk, Annie Payton, Julius Scipio and Daniel Wims.
“We wanted to develop a new paradigm that HBCUs could successfully operate under,” said Newkirk, former FVSU associate vice president for academic affairs, who now serves as an associate provost and graduate school dean for Alabama A&M University.
According to Newkirk, the idea for the book originated from think-tank discussions that the group held regarding two separate proposals by politicians. In 2009, after Georgia state senator Seth Harp suggested the merger of two historically black colleges with predominantly white colleges to save money. Later, Mississippi governor Haley Barbour asked that his state’s three predominately black colleges merge.
“We wanted to look at HBCUs that were successful and those that lost accreditation, and we wanted to see what we could do to help HBCUs,” said Newkirk. He says that their book is already being put to use by several national HBCUs.
The work includes essays, which discuss HBCUs’ origins, the politics of access to opportunities, and management and governance within historically black institutions.  The book, published by McFarland Press costs $45 and is available on Amazon.com.A group with ties to Fort Valley State University promises their new book will help the nation’s historically black colleges and universities thrive. “A New Life for Historically Black Colleges and Universities: a 21st Century Perspective,” recently published by McFarland Press, identifies challenges that HBCUs are currently facing, and provides strategies to overcome them.
Eight FVSU faculty and former FVSU administrators authored portions of the book. The collaboration includes Women’s Center director Juone Brown, history faculty members Drs. Meigan Fields, Dawn J. Herd-Clark and Komanduri S. Murty, and former FVSU administrators Drs. Vann Newkirk, Annie Payton, Julius Scipio and Daniel Wims.
“We wanted to develop a new paradigm that HBCUs could successfully operate under,” said Newkirk, former FVSU associate vice president for academic affairs, who now serves as an associate provost and graduate school dean for Alabama A&M University.
According to Newkirk, the idea for the book originated from think-tank discussions that the group held regarding two separate proposals by politicians. In 2009, after Georgia state senator Seth Harp suggested the merger of two historically black colleges with predominantly white colleges to save money. Later, Mississippi governor Haley Barbour asked that his state’s three predominately black colleges merge.
“We wanted to look at HBCUs that were successful and those that lost accreditation, and we wanted to see what we could do to help HBCUs,” said Newkirk. He says that their book is already being put to use by several national HBCUs.
The work includes essays, which discuss HBCUs’ origins, the politics of access to opportunities, and management and governance within historically black institutions.  The book, published by McFarland Press costs $45 and is available on Amazon.com.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/new-life-for-historically-black-colleges-and-universities-vann-r-newkirk/1110783869

15
General Discussion Forum / Full Accreditation For FVSU Is Affirmed
« on: December 11, 2012, 10:36:02 PM »
In a message released to Fort Valley State University faculty and staff, President Larry E. Rivers has announced that the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) has voted to affirm the university’s full accreditation.

Rivers stated, “This means that our accreditation now is without qualification of any kind.”

The SACS action came at its annual December meeting held in Dallas, Texas, on Monday and Tuesday, December 10 and 11, 2012.  At the same meeting one year earlier, the organization had placed FVSU on a “warning” status.  That action had been aimed at encouraging rapid resolution of specified audit concerns, including issues related to faculty credentialing, financial aid, and specified fiscal procedures.

By telephone from Dallas, Rivers explained, “For the most part, FVSU in December 2011 already had implemented needed reforms or was on the verge of implementing them.  We felt confident that, once these reforms had proved their worth, the warning status would be lifted.  I thank SACS and its leadership for working with us to arrive at this very satisfactory end to the process.”

Rivers’ message lauded FVSU faculty and staff for the good news.  He declared, “Credit for this excellent conclusion goes to all of you who have worked tirelessly and also sacrificed for the good of our students and our historic institution of higher learning.  Obstacles large and small truly have been overcome, not least of which have been financial constraints brought about the worse economic recession since the Great Depression.  Still, the FVSU Family has proved once again that it is more than capable of remarkable effort to meet imposing challenges.”

Having established a solid and efficient foundation for university fiscal operations, Rivers also has made clear the university’s determination to maintain and build upon its current standing.  He stated, “FVSU’s commitment now and for the future is to strong fiscal management practices.  Our desire is to attain the highest standards for the benefit of our university and our state.”

Rivers became FVSU’s eighth president in March 2006.  Enrollment at the time had dropped to less than 2,000, and the school had endured a variety of chronic financial and programmatic issues.  Despite an enrollment decline in fall 2012, the total has mounted since 2006 to nearly 3,600.  Those students live and learn on a revitalized campus complemented with new and renovated facilities while pursuing a broad variety of traditional and recently implemented undergraduate and graduate programs.

FVSU is a member institution of the University System of Georgia and the state’s only 1890 land-grant institution.
--FVSU--

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