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Discussion => General Discussion Forum => Topic started by: Brother Tony on April 18, 2011, 02:31:11 PM

Title: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Brother Tony on April 18, 2011, 02:31:11 PM
Debate still rages on which is better

By Kevin Spear Orlando Sentinel
 
6:41 p.m. EDT, April 17, 2011
os-bottled-water-20110417

The next time you go to the vending machine for a bottle of water (costing 6 cents an ounce) or, instead, sip from the drinking fountain (free), you will be taking part in another debate that touches on the fate of humankind.

Because the next time you grab a bottle from a case in the fridge (costing a penny an ounce) or fill a glass from the tap (a penny for 5 gallons) you will be choosing between dollars and cents, essential hydration and environmental waste, and personal health and public health.

Let your wallet be your first guide, opponents of bottled water say.

"The bottled-water industry has really built a market on casting doubt on the quality of tap water," said Kristin Urquiza, director of Think Outside the Bottle, a campaign devised by Corporate Accountability International, a Boston-based group. "But more and more people are saying, 'Wait a minute, bottled water is costing thousands of times more than tap water.' "

Convenience has its virtues, industry supporters say.

"Sometimes it's a moment-by-moment choice, where you are in front of the 7-Eleven cooler and you grab a bottle of water because that's all you really want instead of a carbonated beverage," said Tom Luria, spokesman for the International Bottled Water Association. "That should be applauded by everyone, just because of obesity and heart disease and other problems that come with excessive calories."

As sales of bottled water took off during the past decade, so did a backlash from environmental and consumer groups that encourage use of reusable bottles.

When sales dropped in 2008 and 2009, the industry blamed the recession, while opponents claimed progress in turning the public against bottled water.

Today, sales are back on track, according to Luria. But not entirely, said Urquiza, pointing to a continued lag last year in revenue for Nestlé Waters North America Inc., the largest U.S. bottler of water and the owner of several brands, including Florida-based Zephyrhills.

Figures published by the Beverage Marketing Corp., a private research company, show that the industry rebounded last year to sell 8.8 billion gallons, or nearly as much as it sold in 2007, the peak year for sales.

That's not the sole result of any economic recovery; the personal-sized, disposable bottle of water also got significantly cheaper.

"In the single-serve market — the 1.5-liter-size containers and smaller — that segment had very aggressive pricing in 2010, and that's one of the factors that helped drive the growth," said Gary Hemphill, Beverage Marketing's managing director.

According to his research on gallons sold, sports-and-energy drinks and ready-to-drink tea and coffee had the greatest gains last year, followed by bottled water, which had an overall growth of 3.5 percent. Soda, still the leading beverage product, continued a multiyear decline.

"The general movement of the consumer is toward healthier refreshments," Hemphill said. "In that spectrum, we think bottled water is positioned well for growth."

Industry supporters and detractors spar regularly over the effects, good and bad, of bottling water.

Industry supporters note that bottlers have switched to containers made with a third less plastic, reducing them from 18.9 grams — or the weight of about four nickels — to 12.7 grams.

Industry detractors say the rate of recycling bottles, according to government figures, is a dismal 25 percent. Even Zephyrhills packaging notes "fewer than 25% of all plastic bottles actually are recycled. We need your help."

And the quest by bottled-water companies to tap new sources continues to stir controversy.

After a bitter fight, Niagara Bottling Co. got permission two years ago to pump as much as 484,000 gallons a day from the Floridan Aquifer near Groveland. Today, Panhandle residents are fighting to prevent Nestlé from taking nearly 500,000 gallons a day from the spring-fed Wacissa River.

In many respects, the choice of whether to drink bottled water touches on the kinds of trade-offs Americans routinely face in their everyday lives.

A car with a big engine may be fun to drive but costs more at the pump and contributes to a dependency on foreign oil. Setting the air conditioner at 70 degrees may feel comfortable but results in higher utility bills and in power plants discharging more greenhouse gas.

According to Nestlé spokeswoman Jane Lazgin, opting for bottled water is not about saying no to tap water; it's about saying yes to a healthier alternative to soft drinks.

"I think society has just become more conscious and mindful of calories in their diet and calories in their beverages," Lazgin said. "People are just getting back to water."

Luria, of the International Bottled Water Association, said tap water is "essential to modern living."

"I don't want to knock tap water," Luria said. "Sometimes bottled water is preferable. It tastes better, it looks better, it's cost-effective if purchased at a big-box store."

But Emily Wurth, director of Food & Water Watch's water program, said bottled-water marketing implies that tap water is unpleasant and unsafe when, by contrast, not all bottled water is as clean and well-regulated as tap water.

"People who probably can't afford bottled water chose it anyway because the marketing has made them fear for the safety of their tap water," Wurth said.

Her worry is that, as confidence in public-water supplies erodes, support and maintenance for public-water supplies are likely to diminish, setting the stage for takeovers by private enterprise.

"We would be reverting to what a developing country is like, where those who are affluent enough can purchase safe water," Wurth said.

Orlando Utilities Commission, the region's largest water utility, doesn't foresee losing customers' confidence because of bottled-water marketing. The utility has 32 wells that each extend 1,400 feet into the Floridan Aquifer. They are among the deepest and best-protected wells in Florida — and they tap the same water source that Niagara Bottling draws from.

OUC's primary water treatment uses ozone, a form of oxygen that zaps impurities. A trace of chlorine is added, as required by regulations, to ensure that the water remains sanitary in pipelines.

Rob Teegarden, an OUC vice president, said bottled water serves a purpose, including convenience.

"If you are willing to pay 3,000 to 8,000 times more for it [than for tap water], more power to you," Teegarden said.

He said a bigger challenge for public-water suppliers is avoiding a major contamination incident.

"If that happens, all bets are off," Teegarden said. "But the same could happen with bottled water."


Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: aggiegrad2009 on April 18, 2011, 02:38:25 PM
Give me the Bottled Water.....Tap water is NASTY.... :no:
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: 90Aggie on April 18, 2011, 02:42:10 PM
At home, I drink bottled water.  I don't have an ice maker and I'm too trifling to make ice or keep a pitcher of water in the fridge, so bottled water it is.  I just hate lugging those cases up the stairs. I'd been looking for a filter to hook-up to the faucet, but I haven't followed through on the purchase.  

During work hours, I used to get water from the fountains, but the news  said DC water has lead in it, so I'm back on bottled water here, too.  

I don't mind drinking from the tap, but I'm conditioned to grabbing a bottle now.  
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Brother Tony on April 18, 2011, 02:49:23 PM
BOTH!  :shrug:
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Maroon and Gray on April 18, 2011, 03:12:55 PM
Give me the Bottled Water.....Tap water is NASTY.... :no:

Depending on which brand, you do realize some bottled waters is the local tap water where they are bottled.
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Ivan on April 18, 2011, 03:18:11 PM
I drink tap water.
Since living in the South, I haven't lived anywhere yet that the water didn't taste fine.
I guess that's reflective of having lived in Los Angeles and experienced our tap water.

..........and I don't buy organic produce either. ::)
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Brother Tony on April 18, 2011, 03:20:19 PM
 :lol: :clap:
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: ‘87 Alum on April 18, 2011, 03:22:08 PM
Tap water by far. I ain't paying nobody for bottled tap water!
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Jay_Thomas on April 18, 2011, 03:24:55 PM
When I lived in a condo off of Godby Rd, the water coming out of the faucets tasted sour, like it had onions in it, so I bought water in big ole cartons.  Moved down the street from there and the water was fine. Moved over to the west side and the water is fine, so I still get it on tap and I use a Brita filter for my pitcher in the fridge.
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Golden Kitten on April 18, 2011, 03:38:52 PM
Depends on where I am - if I'm in an urban area, I drink tap water. If I'm down at the home house, it's bottled. I can't stand the smell or taste of well/pump water...

(http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f162/GoldenKitten917/cats10.jpg)
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: 90Aggie on April 18, 2011, 03:44:36 PM
so I still get it on tap and I use a Brita filter for my pitcher in the fridge.

Do you have the dohickey on the faucet or the pitcher you put in the refrigerator? 

Are the filters expensive?  How often do you have to change them? 
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: aggiegrad2009 on April 18, 2011, 03:56:33 PM
Depends on where I am - if I'm in an urban area, I drink tap water. If I'm down at the home house, it's bottled. I can't stand the smell or taste of well/pump water...

(http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f162/GoldenKitten917/cats10.jpg)

See I'm the opposite I can't stand the after taste of the city water...I think the one in Greensboro turned me off from it because it had this AWFUL after taste....Truth be told I can't even get myself to taste the water down here in Charlotte,  it might not taste as bad but can't pull myself to do it so I've been buying my water since I got here....

Now when I visit my parent's home they have the filters on the fridge and sinks so I can actually drink that water.

My grandparents down in the country had well/pump water and I thought that was the best water ever LOL....
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Golden Kitten on April 18, 2011, 04:05:41 PM
Hmmmmmmmmmmm...the water up in these parts is actually pretty good - I've never noticed an after taste...
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: y04185 on April 18, 2011, 04:28:04 PM
Bottled water has no flouride.
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Neymar on April 18, 2011, 04:53:34 PM
When I was little my mom use to run through bottled water...said tap water was gross and would make her sick. One day the old man got tired of it, and filled up an entire box full of bottle water bottles with regular tap water. She drunk it, and didnt get sick. When she found out she was not a happy camper, and until this day she still only drinks bottled water.

Its a mental thing with most people
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Jaggrad on April 18, 2011, 05:45:40 PM
I use filtered water... I very rarely purchase bottled water...

Faucet water... I just hate the taste... but I believe that has to do with geographical area you are in...

Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Jaimac on April 18, 2011, 08:50:21 PM
Give me the Bottled Water.....Tap water is NASTY.... :no:

Depending on which brand, you do realize some bottled waters is the local tap water where they are bottled.

If the label on the bottle does NOT state that it is spring water, then it is tap water that has gone through another purification process in addition to municipal treatment.  Water bottlers who sell purified drinking water use municipal/tap water as their source.

Examples of purified drinking water include.......

(http://www3.images.coolspotters.com/photos/9126/dasani-water-profile.jpg)


(http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTTbV1ywpumZ7g_dWHp_35mLT-LqnO3oJzSgVriMYZ-7l-FAJT1M6-pCwA)

and.....

(http://ts4.mm.bing.net/images/thumbnail.aspx?q=775752065763&id=4f49e0d09101bad097bc19f82d3642a2&url=http%3a%2f%2f2.bp.blogspot.com%2f__H1Tvv3m_TQ%2fTLyL-EgC8QI%2fAAAAAAAAAL8%2f-JdrsDpV8WY%2fs1600%2faquafina_pepsico_new_ecobottle.jpg)
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: soflorattler on April 19, 2011, 06:53:25 PM
A little  :offtopic: , but...

How To Make Clear Ice Cubes
(http://hubpages.com/hub/How-To-Make-Clear-Ice-Cubes)

Apparently you've noticed what a number of other people have also noticed ... that when you get ice cubes in a drink at a restaurant, they're sparkling clear. When you make ice cubes in trays in your own home, they are white or a more murky color. So you're wondering why that is. And more importantly, you want to know what you can to make clear ice cubes in your home. Making clear ice cubes at home is difficult but it's not impossible. It requires using the right products to start off with and using the right freezing process.

One of the main reasons that ice cubes in restaurants are clear and your own ice cubes are not is because the restaurant ice cubes start off as much purer than what you're probably using in your home. Most people just take their frozen ice cube trays and run them under their tap water and then stick that in the freezer. If you've ever looked at a glass of your tap water, you'll know that the swirling things inside it aren't exactly conducive to making clear ice cubes. The water itself isn't clear, how would the ice cubes ever be clear?

So the first thing that you need to do to make clear ice cubes is to use clear water. This means that you should use distilled water. Buy the pure stuff in the bottle at the store. If it's clear in the bottle, it's going to be clear in a glass. But don't stop there. You should take the pure water that you've bought, put it in a clean pan (preferably one rinsed out with this same water) and boil it. This helps to get rid of all of the excess minerals that can cloud up your water and make your ice cubes less clear.

Starting off with clear water is only the first part of the process for making clear ice cubes. The other part is the freezing process. If you really want to get clear ice cubes every time, you're going to need to throw out the cheap plastic ice cube trays that came with your freezer and invest in a pricier kind. No, it's not because more expensive is equivalent to better. It's because you need a specific kind of ice cube tray to make clear ice cubes. You see, part of that clear quality comes from the way that the ice forms. A clear ice cube is formed in layers with low exposure to air during the cooling process. You can purchase special trays and contraptions that will help with this.

If you don't want to foot the bill for special trays, you can increase the clarity of your ice cubes by using clean trays and a slow cooling process. Professional restaurants use a cooling system that involves circulating the water so that it's running as it cools. You can create a system like this in your home if you're creative. If not, stick with metal ice trays which you clean with purified water before every use. Add the distilled and boiled water and freeze. You're ice cubes may not be restaurant-quality clear but they should be a lot clearer than they have been in the past.
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: Brother Tony on April 20, 2011, 10:11:31 AM
After that Crown Royal Black hit those Clear Ice Cubes...IT WON'T DAYUM MATTER!   :nono2:  :lol:
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: FunCkMaster on April 20, 2011, 12:25:40 PM
I used to drink mainly Deer Park Water, but to save a lil scratch, the wife and I use the brita filter. The water tastes pretty good with the filter. Without it, it's kinda nasty.
Title: Re: Bottled water or tap water?
Post by: klg14 on April 21, 2011, 06:36:47 PM
Tapped examines the role of the bottled water industry and its' effects on our health, climate change, pollution, and our reliance on oil . . .

http://www.tappedthemovie.com/