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'Slave' vs 'Enslaved Person'- What do you call the people from this time period?
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Author Topic: 'Slave' vs 'Enslaved Person'- What do you call the people from this time period?  (Read 11926 times)
NovaSkegee
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« on: July 01, 2009, 11:10:14 AM »

'Slave' vs 'Enslaved' person- the current political correct term.
What term do you used when talking about the African Holocaust/The Atlantic and Arab Slave Trade or the Maafa?


Do slaves express forbidden feelings and desires, such as anger, resentment, or a longing for freedom or do they just accept the condition of life they live in?

Or

Does one who is enslaved express forbidden feelings and desires, such as anger, resentment, or a longing for freedom or do they just accept the condition of life they are forced to live in?
_______________________________________________

A Slave: A person held in servitude as the chattel of another; One that is completely subservient to a dominating influence.  A slave has a mental state of being compliant and obedient to an authority and does not think of freedom.

Enslaved Person: A person who has been forced into a lifestyle of forced labor for the economic advancement of another where one's freedom has been completely removed; or one who has been brought into servitude or chattel of another. An enslaved person will have thoughts of freedom, even if all they have known is this enslaved condition.











Most enslaved Africans could not read or write. Spiritual songs provided a means of verbal, coded communication understood only by those singing them. Outsiders, mainly whites, generally interpreted the spiritual songs on a literal level, while enslaved Africans knew the meaning of the messages hidden within the words and phrases.

"Wade in the Water"

Wade in the water (children)
Wade in the water
Wade in the water
God's gonna trouble the water

If you don't believe I've been redeemed
God's gonna trouble the water
I want you to follow him on down to Jordan stream
(I said) My God's gonna trouble the water
You know chilly water is dark and cold
(I know my) God's gonna trouble the water
You know it chills my body but not my soul
(I said my) God's gonna trouble the water

(Come on let's) wade in the water
Wade in the water (children)
Wade in the water
God's gonna trouble the water

Now if you should get there before I do
(I know) God's gonna trouble the water
Tell all my friends that I'm comin' too
(I know) God's gonna trouble the water
Sometimes I'm up lord and sometimes I'm down
(You know my) God's gonna trouble the water
Sometimes I'm level to the ground
God's gonna trouble the water
(I Know) God's gonna trouble the water

Wade in the water (children)
Wade out in the water (children)
God's gonna trouble the water

"Swing Low Sweet Chariot"

Chorus:
Swing low, sweet chariot,
Comin' for to carry me home;
Swing low, sweet chariot,
Comin' for to carry me home.

I looked over Jordan,
And What did I see,
Comin' for to carry me home,
A band of angels comin' after me,
Comin' for to carry me home.

Repeat chorus:

If you get there before I do,
Comin' for to carry me home,
Tell all my friends I'm comin' too,
Comin' for to carry me home.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2009, 11:57:09 AM by NovaSkegee » Logged
NovaSkegee
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2009, 11:52:31 AM »

Have you ever thought about when people use the term "slaves" vs "enslaved blacks or Africans"?

Say for example should one say:

"Slaves built the White House." or "Enslaved Africans built the White House."


"My grand mother's mother was as slave." or "My grand mother's mother was enslaved."


"The Williams plantation had over 200 slaves." or "The Williams plantation enslaved over 200 blacks or Africans.

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NovaSkegee
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2009, 01:56:59 PM »

Do you think most blacks or Africans who were in the Americas (be it the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America or South America) during this time thought of themselves as slaves or enslaved?

If your past family members suffered from such a condition do you think of them as having been slaves or having been enslaved?


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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2009, 02:04:38 PM »

it all depends on how you're using the word.  Slave is a noun.  Enslaved is a verb.
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2009, 02:08:31 PM »

it all depends on how you're using the word.  Slave is a noun.  Enslaved is a verb.

Is it a verb when you use it such as follows:

"There were many enslaved Africans in Virginia." and "There were many African slaves in Virginia."

With what you've stated, and thanks for the reply by the way on the subject, was is not always a constant action to keep the blacks or Africans enslaved in the Americas or were these people willing to be in this condition without even a thought of freedom thus, simply being slaves (a mental state of existance).


I just notice the rewards above say "Runaway" and not "Runaway Slave"


Also, notice these ads. They also don't say "Slaves" they say "To be Sold- Negroes"




Of course there are some ads that can befound that say "slaves". But, from who's point of view do these ads come from? It's from the white populations that was wanting to enslave people.


« Last Edit: July 01, 2009, 02:23:58 PM by NovaSkegee » Logged
Shelt from Skegee
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« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2009, 09:11:16 AM »

Sorry guys,

'Enslaved' is an adjective in this case, not a verb.

In the sentence nova used "enslaved" is a modifier of the noun "Africans".  The verb in that sentence is "were".

This grammar lesson brought to you buy Mrs. Sally P. Harris, may she always Rest in Peace!
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2009, 09:16:33 AM »

By the way, In my opinion there is absolutely no difference between the term "slave" and "enslaved person".  They both mean exactly the same thing, and neither carries any implications as to the person's mental state (whether they want to be free or not).
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NovaSkegee
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« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2009, 10:25:38 AM »

How about when you hear the terms.......for example which condition gives you the thought or feeling that gives you the impact of condition and for example when speaking about some form of reparations?

"There were thousands of Africa slaves who came through Annapolis, MD." or "There were thousands of enslaved Africans who came through Annapolis, MD."

or

"Harriet Tubman made many missions to rescue black or African slaves." or "Harriet Tubman made many missions to rescue enslaved blacks or Africans."

or  

"There were many fugitive black or African slaves who escaped to Canada." or "There were many fugitive enslaved blacks or Africans who escaped to Canada."
« Last Edit: July 02, 2009, 12:09:51 PM by NovaSkegee » Logged
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« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2009, 06:45:35 PM »

And here's another statment and see how you feel gives the stronger thought:

"The first European country to import African slaves to the Americas was ...."

or

"The first European country to import enslaved Africans to the Americas was ...."
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« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2009, 11:57:04 AM »

Missed this thread, Nova.

I often use "enslaved African" because:

1) the noun is primary and it emphasizes that we are talking about a person
2) it reinforces the correct geographical origins of the subject as opposed to, for example, "American slaves" or "Black slaves."
3) the adjective reminds the reader that forced action was taken against the African

Good topic!
 Afro

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NovaSkegee
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« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2009, 01:09:25 PM »

Missed this thread, Nova.

I often use "enslaved African" because:

1) the noun is primary and it emphasizes that we are talking about a person
2) it reinforces the correct geographical origins of the subject as opposed to, for example, "American slaves" or "Black slaves."
3) the adjective reminds the reader that forced action was taken against the African

Good topic!
 Afro



I really agree with your views. You've stated some good points.

something just doesn't seem right when ever I hear the term "slave". Because our people were not "African slaves"....they were "enslaved Africans". They were forced into a condition and slave sounds like an accepted way of life. When we know from history and facts that these people wanted to be free to live like humans. Hell, there were many revolts and escapes.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2009, 01:14:01 PM by NovaSkegee » Logged
Shelt from Skegee
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« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2009, 08:12:45 AM »

And here's another statment and see how you feel gives the stronger thought:

"The first European country to import African slaves to the Americas was ...."

or

"The first European country to import enslaved Africans to the Americas was ...."

I guess its just my technical nature, because when I read the 2 examples here I discern no difference in meaning between the terms "African slaves" and "enslaved Africans".

About the only time I think there maybe a difference is when the subject is discussing the place of origin.  Was the person originally from Africa.  Or was the person born into slavery in America.  In "Roots", Kunta Kinte was an enslaved African.  Chicken George (Kunta's grandson) was a slave born into slavery in America.

In Nova's 2 examples the noun-adjective combinations can both be taken to mean persons who were originally from Africa.
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NovaSkegee
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« Reply #12 on: July 06, 2009, 12:47:29 PM »

To simply call a person or a group of people black/African slave or black/African slaves does not express the condition these people lived in or who they were.

When one states for example:

African slaves lived in substandard shelter and had their family members sold off to other plantation owners.

or

Enslaved Africans lived in substandard shelter and had their family members sold off to other plantation owners.

Which statement gives the reader more thought that these were people forced into a condition of servitude?


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« Reply #13 on: July 06, 2009, 01:04:00 PM »

Again Nova in your 2 most recent examples I draw the exact same meaning from the 2 sentences.  Neither one, whether the subject is "enslaved Africans", or "African slaves" gives me more thought that these people were "forced into a condition of servitude" over the other.  To me the noun "Slave" implies forced servitude.

Of coursed the adjective "enslaved" carries the implication that someone has forced the condition of servitude on them.  However I already get that implication from the noun "Slave".

Afterall I don't think it can be said that anyone actually chose to become a slave.  Either that person was forced into that condition, or that person was born into that condition and forced to remain in the condition.
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« Reply #14 on: July 06, 2009, 02:00:19 PM »

Again Nova in your 2 most recent examples I draw the exact same meaning from the 2 sentences.  Neither one, whether the subject is "enslaved Africans", or "African slaves" gives me more thought that these people were "forced into a condition of servitude" over the other.  To me the noun "Slave" implies forced servitude.

Of coursed the adjective "enslaved" carries the implication that someone has forced the condition of servitude on them.  However I already get that implication from the noun "Slave".

Afterall I don't think it can be said that anyone actually chose to become a slave.  Either that person was forced into that condition, or that person was born into that condition and forced to remain in the condition.

When you speak of African American history do you personally say "black/Afriacan slaves" or "enslaved blacks/Africans"?
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