Quantcast
Latest posts of: tbertque
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 19, 2014, 11:26:05 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News: In case some of you have forgotten, please go back and read the agreement you signed before registering on this board.  "PERSONAL ATTACKS" will not be tolerated.  Continuous attacks on an individual, including revealing who you think a person is or sending Private Messages with threats and attacks, are grounds for removal from the registration listing.  If you can't be civil, go someplace else. Don't discredit your education by showing your "thug" personality.

  Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 » Last
1  Discussion / Sports Forum / Re: Maurice Bertrand Trenton Freedom Football PIFL to the NFL on: March 20, 2014, 10:04:46 PM

GET TO KNOW....

Maurice Bertrand, Defensive Lineman

Basic Information:
6’4”
285 lbs.

Football Career:
 High School: Cherry Hill High School, Yonkers N.Y.
College: Lincoln University, Shaw University

The Interview:

Q: What made you decide to play for the Trenton Freedom?

MB: The big thing was Coach O’Hanlon and the relationship that we had together. Especially since I play defense, he’s a defensive mastermind. I think me and him will work well together.

Q: How is it going to feel playing close to home in front of friends and family?

MB: It’ll feel good. My dad is a big supporter of my football career, and it’s good that he won’t have to travel too far. I know he’ll make all of the games regardless.

Q: What are some personal goals you have with the team?

MB: Definitely [to get] a ring. I’m glad I can play with some of my former college teammates. My major goal is get a ring with this team. And just to get a better relationship with my teammates and coaches. It’s a network situation, and we’ll be lifelong friends after that.

Q: What are your likes and interests off the football field?

MB: Off the field, I’m a big video-gamer. I love Madden, Call of Duty, all of them. I love working out, that’s definitely a big thing now. I’m also big on cars. Me and my dad love them and we fix everything ourselves.

Want to know more? Maurice is a Featured Player, check it out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQtkHE_65eI (Interview starts at 11:10, ends at 29:20)
   






 






2  Discussion / Sports Forum / Maurice Bertrand Trenton Freedom Football PIFL to the NFL on: March 20, 2014, 09:57:48 PM
This weekend, the Lincoln University Lions football team will take on Bowie State in their annual homecoming game. For one player, it's a game many thought he'd never play.

When you meet Maurice Bertrand, who stands 6 foot 2 with 280 pounds of muscle, two words come to mind: "gentle giant." Except, apparently, that's not accurate when he's on the field.

"You know, teammates, they got a couple jokes," Bertrand said. "Lip. They call me 'lip' 'cause I got a little lip."

Bertrand trash talks. But if anyone deserves to talk some trash, it's him. Last year he nearly died in Camden, N.J.

"I was having a barbecue," he said. "It was a Sunday, June 26, 6:30 — never forget it — and we had ran out of barbecue sauce. And I was on my way to the store to go get some more barbecue sauce for the barbecue, and on my way there, I seen an altercation from someone at the barbecue. And he was getting jumped by a few other males, so I intervened, broke it up, and made sure he was alright and basically continued my walk back to the store."

He thought the incident was over. On his way back from the store, he said, the people he had seen fighting came back and started to fire shots at him.

"I got shot basically five times. After the second shot, I collapsed," he said.

'Will I be able to play again?'

Bertrand had been shot with high-caliber bullets: once in the back, once in the ankle, once in the shoulder, and twice in the leg.

"My femur was shattered," Bertrand said. "Like, I had no femur. As of right now, I have a metal rod in there from my hip down to my knee."

His coach, O.J. Abanishe, says he visited Bertrand in the hospital after he received news of the shooting. He says the prognosis was grim.

"Some of the doctors thought, well, he probably won't play again. And they even told us, they said, 'Well, we'll tell some patients things just to keep them going — just to keep going to make sure that they continue their rehab so they don't get frustrated,' and things like that."

Bertrand said, "First thing I asked the doctor was: 'Will I be able to play again?' That's the first question I asked. And you know, he told me first I've got to see if I can walk again."

Not only did Bertrand walk again. He played this season. He hit every milestone of his recovery months ahead of schedule. Other than his scars, it's hard to tell anything ever happened to him.

Doctors told him, if it weren't for his size, the bullets would have pierced his vital organs, and he'd be dead. That's right. His muscles acted as a sort of bullet proof vest.

Abanishe says Bertrand's recovery was possible because of relentless hard work.

Getting a second chance

"Every week, he straightened out that leg a little bit more," he said. "He went from walking on a cane to walking without a cane to jogging to sprinting to being able to do a squat. So you saw how it kind of went step by step by step by step by step. And each step might have seemed small to us, but it was huge to him and led all the way back to this season."

Not everyone gets a second chance, said Bertrand. "So just the fact that I was able to get a second chance just to live, I just had to come back and just play football if I was still given the opportunity," he said.

Bertrand is looking to play football at the next level, whatever level that may be. But if he can't, he'll be looking to put his degree in Internet technology to work in the mobile communications field. He already has a job lined up for next year if he wants it.

If his rebound from catastrophic injuries seems remarkable to those around him, their surprise doesn't seem to be rubbing off on Bertrand. He says he thinks if anyone else were in his situation, they'd find a way to come back.

He says he doesn't want to be treted any differently from anyone else. "You know, just because I have a rod in my leg or I've been shot five times doesn't mean — I don't want to be treated no different, no other way," he said. "I want to just be a regular player that's out there on the field. Don't treat me different: 'Oh, Bertrand, you relax.' No. I want to do what he's doing and he can do what I'm doing."

Despite long odds, Maurice Bertrand, number 53, will take the field in this weekend's homecoming game.
3  Discussion / Sports Forum / Maurice Bertrand Trenton Freedom Football PIFL on: March 08, 2014, 12:51:45 AM

GET TO KNOW....

Maurice Bertrand, Defensive Lineman

Basic Information:
6’4”
285 lbs.

Football Career:
 High School: Cherry Hill High School, Yonkers N.Y.
College: Lincoln University, Shaw University

The Interview:

Q: What made you decide to play for the Trenton Freedom?

MB: The big thing was Coach O’Hanlon and the relationship that we had together. Especially since I play defense, he’s a defensive mastermind. I think me and him will work well together.

Q: How is it going to feel playing close to home in front of friends and family?

MB: It’ll feel good. My dad is a big supporter of my football career, and it’s good that he won’t have to travel too far. I know he’ll make all of the games regardless.

Q: What are some personal goals you have with the team?

MB: Definitely [to get] a ring. I’m glad I can play with some of my former college teammates. My major goal is get a ring with this team. And just to get a better relationship with my teammates and coaches. It’s a network situation, and we’ll be lifelong friends after that.

Q: What are your likes and interests off the football field?

MB: Off the field, I’m a big video-gamer. I love Madden, Call of Duty, all of them. I love working out, that’s definitely a big thing now. I’m also big on cars. Me and my dad love them and we fix everything ourselves.

Want to know more? Maurice is a Featured Player, check it out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQtkHE_65eI (Interview starts at 11:10, ends at 29:20)
4  Discussion / Sports Forum / HBCU stars set for NFL draft Defense on: April 22, 2013, 01:10:57 PM
Defensive Players

Brandon Thurmond, defensive lineman, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 6-2, 260 pounds

Thurmond used his quickness and strength to become one of the best pass rushers in the FCS. He led the SWAC with 16.5 sacks. Thurmond has a great knack of getting to the quarterback.

Brad Davis, defensive lineman, Elizabeth City State, 6-1, 245 pounds

Davis received Division II All-American honors. It’s not hard to see why he had 15.5 sacks. He also played the run very well with 25.5 tackles for loss of 142 yards. He’s one of the most athletic linemen in the country.

Joseph LeBeau, defensive lineman, Jackson State, 6-1, 245 pounds

LeBeau was one of the top defensive players in the SWAC. He had eight sacks last season. LeBeau is a great pass rusher. He can play the run, too. He had 54 total and 33 solo tackles.

Tim Green, defensive end, Lincoln University, 6-1, 215 pounds

Green was an All-CIAA selection. He had a great season 78 total and 33 solo tackles. He had a chance to participate in the Temple Pro Day last month.

Maurice Bertrand, defensive lineman, Lincoln University, 6-2, 280 pounds

Bertrand has good size and strength. He knows how to swarm to the football. Bertrand played along side of Lincoln standout Tim Green.

Vauchard Goodridge, defensive lineman, Clark Atlanta, 6-1, 250 pounds

Goodridge was named co-Defensive Player of the Year in the SIAC with linebacker Leron Furr from Fort Valley State. He had 51 total tackles, two forced fumbles and 16 tackles for loss.

Bill Ross, linebacker, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 6-2, 240 pounds

Ross led the SWAC in total tackles with 117. He had 63 solo tackles. Ross knows how to anticipate the run. He has a great understanding of how to play the game.

Leron Furr, linebacker, Fort Valley State, 6-1, 225 pounds

Furr is a real playmaking linebacker. He had 100 total tackles, 5.3 sacks and two interceptions.

Jakar Hamilton, defensive back, South Carolina State, 6-1, 200 pounds

Hamilton is a solid player in the secondary. He knows how to come up and stop the run. He had 40 total and 26 solo tackles last season.

Kejuan Riley, free safety, Alabama State, 6-1, 208 pounds

Riley is one of the best defensive players in the FCS. He covers a lot of ground in the secondary. He had four interceptions along with 55 total and 39 solo tackles last season.

Vernon Marshall, defensive back, Alabama A&M, 5-11, 188 pounds

Marshall is a real hitter. He’s a great open field tackler. He had 101 total and 50 solo tackles last year.

Contact staff writer Donald Hunt at (215) 893-5719 or dhunt@phillytrib.comThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
Read 268 times Published in Football
 
5  Discussion / Sports Forum / HBCU stars set for NFL draft Defense on: April 20, 2013, 09:41:51 AM
Defensive Players

Brandon Thurmond, defensive lineman, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 6-2, 260 pounds

Thurmond used his quickness and strength to become one of the best pass rushers in the FCS. He led the SWAC with 16.5 sacks. Thurmond has a great knack of getting to the quarterback.

Brad Davis, defensive lineman, Elizabeth City State, 6-1, 245 pounds

Davis received Division II All-American honors. It’s not hard to see why he had 15.5 sacks. He also played the run very well with 25.5 tackles for loss of 142 yards. He’s one of the most athletic linemen in the country.

Joseph LeBeau, defensive lineman, Jackson State, 6-1, 245 pounds

LeBeau was one of the top defensive players in the SWAC. He had eight sacks last season. LeBeau is a great pass rusher. He can play the run, too. He had 54 total and 33 solo tackles.

Tim Green, defensive end, Lincoln University, 6-1, 215 pounds

Green was an All-CIAA selection. He had a great season 78 total and 33 solo tackles. He had a chance to participate in the Temple Pro Day last month.

Maurice Bertrand, defensive lineman, Lincoln University, 6-2, 280 pounds

Bertrand has good size and strength. He knows how to swarm to the football. Bertrand played along side of Lincoln standout Tim Green.

Vauchard Goodridge, defensive lineman, Clark Atlanta, 6-1, 250 pounds

Goodridge was named co-Defensive Player of the Year in the SIAC with linebacker Leron Furr from Fort Valley State. He had 51 total tackles, two forced fumbles and 16 tackles for loss.

Bill Ross, linebacker, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 6-2, 240 pounds

Ross led the SWAC in total tackles with 117. He had 63 solo tackles. Ross knows how to anticipate the run. He has a great understanding of how to play the game.

Leron Furr, linebacker, Fort Valley State, 6-1, 225 pounds

Furr is a real playmaking linebacker. He had 100 total tackles, 5.3 sacks and two interceptions.

Jakar Hamilton, defensive back, South Carolina State, 6-1, 200 pounds

Hamilton is a solid player in the secondary. He knows how to come up and stop the run. He had 40 total and 26 solo tackles last season.

Kejuan Riley, free safety, Alabama State, 6-1, 208 pounds

Riley is one of the best defensive players in the FCS. He covers a lot of ground in the secondary. He had four interceptions along with 55 total and 39 solo tackles last season.

Vernon Marshall, defensive back, Alabama A&M, 5-11, 188 pounds

Marshall is a real hitter. He’s a great open field tackler. He had 101 total and 50 solo tackles last year.

Contact staff writer Donald Hunt at (215) 893-5719 or dhunt@phillytrib.comThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
Read 268 times Published in Football
 
6  Discussion / Sports Forum / HBCU stars set for NFL draft on: April 19, 2013, 04:05:59 PM
 
Howard University linebacker Keith Pough was the MEAC Defensive Player of the Year this past season and has a great chance of getting drafted. —PHOTO/HOWARD When it comes to drafting quality football players, NFL teams should take a good look at some of the pro prospects from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). There are a number of HBCU standouts available at just about every position.

The NFL draft will be held April 25-27. It’s a good chance some of these players will be selected. However, some players may not get drafted, but they will likely sign with NFL teams as undrafted free agents. Thus, they will have an opportunity to play on Sundays.

Top Four HBCU Prospects

Keith Pough, linebacker, Howard, 6-3, 225 pounds

Pough is an outstanding linebacker. He was named to the Sheridan Broadcasting Network Black College All-American team. Pough was selected as the MEAC Defensive Player of the Year. He had a great week in front of the NFL scouts at the East-West Shrine Game and performed well at the NFL Combine.

Pough set a new FCS record for career tackles for losses with 71. He had 60 total, 34 solo tackles and 3.5 sacks last season.

Terron Armstead, offensive tackle, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 6-5, 306 pounds

Armstead is one of the best at his position. He opened up a lot of eyes at the NFL Combine. He ran a 4.71 in the 40-yard dash, a Combine record for offensive linemen. Armstead played in the East-West Shrine Game and the Senior Bowl. He led Arkansas-Pine Bluff to the SWAC championship last season.

Rogers Gaines, offensive tackle, Tennessee State, 6-6, 334 pounds

Gaines is one of the best offensive linemen in the country. He’s a great run blocker. He knows how to pass protect. He can move his feet. Gaines ran a 5.24 in the 40 yard dash at the NFL Combine.

Brandon Hepburn, linebacker, Florida A&M, 6-2, 241 pounds

Hepburn did quite well at the NFL Combine. He clocked a 4.54 in the 40-yard dash. He was a terrific defensive player for the Rattlers. He had 86 total and 60 solo tackles with 5.5 sacks last season.

Best of the Rest

Offensive Players

Kameron Smith, quarterback, Winston-Salem State, 6-1, 187 pounds

Smith had a great year throwing the football. He threw for 3,312 yards while tossing an amazing 43 touchdown passes. He ran for 550 yards and scored five rushing touchdowns. He also led Winston-Salem State to a sensational 14-1 record before losing to Valdosta State in the NCAA Division II championship game.

Derrick Washington, running back, Tuskegee, 6-0, 200 pounds

Washington had a tremendous season. He rushed for 1,729 yards and scored 14 touchdowns. He averaged 7.8 yards a carry. Washington has great speed in the open field.

Daronte McNeil, running back, Elizabeth City State, 6-2, 200 pounds

McNeil runs with plenty of power and can explode through the holes. He rushed for 1, 344 yards on 316 carries while scoring 13 TDs. McNeil guided Elizabeth City State to a 28-13 win over Tuskegee in the Pioneer Bowl earning MVP honors.

Kaderius Lacey, running back, Alabama A&M, 6-0, 218 pounds

Lacey is a great inside runner. He’s capable of picking up the tough yards in short yardage situations. He rushed for 932 yards and scored eight TDs. He averaged 5.1 yards a carry.

Rico Richardson, wide receiver, Jackson State, 6-1, 185 pounds

Richardson was the best receiver in the SWAC. He has great speed. He can run the deep routes. Richardson had 50 receptions for 922 yards and scored eight TDs. He averaged 18.4 yards a reception.

Tyron Laughinghouse, return specialist/wide receiver, St. Augustine’s

Laughinghouse is one of the most exciting small college players in the nation. He’s a great receiver. He finished with 53 receptions for 801 yards and 12 TDs. But Laughinghouse led the country in kickoff returns in Division II. He aversaged 40.1 yards a return. He had three kickoff returns for touchdowns.

Stephen Capier, center, Jackson State, 6-2, 290 pounds

Capier is a great blocker. He moves laterally extremely well. He does a good job of staying with his blocks.

Zion Pratt, offensive tackle, Jackson State, 6-6, 290 pounds

Pratt has good speed and length. He keeps himself in good position. He can get out in front of the play. He’s a good pass blocker as well.

Terren Jones, offensive tackle, Alabama State, 6-7, 320 pounds

Jones is one of the best offensive linemen in the FCS. He knows how to open up big holes for the backs to have great running lanes.

Markus Lawrence, offensive tackle, Winston-Salem State, 6-4, 290 pounds

Lawrence was a big reason why Winston-Salem State has one of the best offenses in Division II. He provided good pass protection and open up some nice holes for the running game.

Jordan Moseley, offensive tackle, Johnson C. Smith, 6-3, 290 pounds

Moseley is a multi-talented offensive lineman. He played tackle and guard for Johnson C. Smith. His blocking skills helped the Golden Lions’ offense get into high gear last season.

Defensive Players

Brandon Thurmond, defensive lineman, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 6-2, 260 pounds

Thurmond used his quickness and strength to become one of the best pass rushers in the FCS. He led the SWAC with 16.5 sacks. Thurmond has a great knack of getting to the quarterback.

Brad Davis, defensive lineman, Elizabeth City State, 6-1, 245 pounds

Davis received Division II All-American honors. It’s not hard to see why he had 15.5 sacks. He also played the run very well with 25.5 tackles for loss of 142 yards. He’s one of the most athletic linemen in the country.

Joseph LeBeau, defensive lineman, Jackson State, 6-1, 245 pounds

LeBeau was one of the top defensive players in the SWAC. He had eight sacks last season. LeBeau is a great pass rusher. He can play the run, too. He had 54 total and 33 solo tackles.

Tim Green, defensive end, Lincoln University, 6-1, 215 pounds

Green was an All-CIAA selection. He had a great season 78 total and 33 solo tackles. He had a chance to participate in the Temple Pro Day last month.

Maurice Bertrand, defensive lineman, Lincoln University, 6-2, 280 pounds

Bertrand has good size and strength. He knows how to swarm to the football. Bertrand played along side of Lincoln standout Tim Green.

Vauchard Goodridge, defensive lineman, Clark Atlanta, 6-1, 250 pounds

Goodridge was named co-Defensive Player of the Year in the SIAC with linebacker Leron Furr from Fort Valley State. He had 51 total tackles, two forced fumbles and 16 tackles for loss.

Bill Ross, linebacker, Arkansas-Pine Bluff, 6-2, 240 pounds

Ross led the SWAC in total tackles with 117. He had 63 solo tackles. Ross knows how to anticipate the run. He has a great understanding of how to play the game.

Leron Furr, linebacker, Fort Valley State, 6-1, 225 pounds

Furr is a real playmaking linebacker. He had 100 total tackles, 5.3 sacks and two interceptions.

Jakar Hamilton, defensive back, South Carolina State, 6-1, 200 pounds

Hamilton is a solid player in the secondary. He knows how to come up and stop the run. He had 40 total and 26 solo tackles last season.

Kejuan Riley, free safety, Alabama State, 6-1, 208 pounds

Riley is one of the best defensive players in the FCS. He covers a lot of ground in the secondary. He had four interceptions along with 55 total and 39 solo tackles last season.

Vernon Marshall, defensive back, Alabama A&M, 5-11, 188 pounds

Marshall is a real hitter. He’s a great open field tackler. He had 101 total and 50 solo tackles last year.

Contact staff writer Donald Hunt at (215) 893-5719 or dhunt@phillytrib.comThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
Read 189 times Published in Football
 
7  Discussion / Sports Forum / ComeBack College Football Player of The Year on: April 18, 2013, 02:14:58 PM
 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, Pa. – Over a year ago, Maurice Bertrand (Yonkers, N.Y./Cherry Hill HS) was fighting, not just for a spot on the football field, but for his life.
 
A typical summer break is filled with trips out of town, visits to the shore, block party celebrations, and graduations to name a few.  Some students look forward to this time off after enduring the rigors of the academic school year.  Maurice decided to spend June 26, 2011 at a memorial barbeque in Camden, N.J. dedicated to a teenage friend who passed away crossing a highway.
 
He had spent the previous Sunday, Father's Day, in church with his father.  The two at times are inseparable.  The bond between this father and son duo is inseparable. Maurice begged his father to teach him how to play football ever since he was 10 years-old and was struck with a baseball. Tyrone Bertrand, a Shaw University graduate, played defensive back for the Bears.
 
But on this Sunday, Maurice wanted to pay tribute to his friend.
 
“Maurice usually would have been at church, but this Sunday I told him I would let him go to the barbeque,” Tyrone R. Bertrand, Maurice's father, said.
 
Once Maurice arrived at the barbeque, he was tasked with buying barbeque sauce from the neighborhood store.  While walking to the local store, Maurice noticed something disturbing.
 
“I saw a person at the barbeque getting jump by a group of about five guys,”  Maurice said.
 
Instead of ignoring the situation, Maurice assumed the role of “Good Samaritan' and broke up the fight. At the time, everyone scattered and things were back to normal or so they seemed.
 
Maurice continued walking to the store and about 20 minutes later he finally purchased the sauce. Realizing everyone at the barbeque was probably getting restless for the sauce, Maurice began his journey back.
 
What happens next is like a scene from a movie.
 
Maurice noticed something familiar about a group of guys packed in a car.  As soon as he realized who they were, the car took off after him.  One of the guys in the vehicle noticed it was Maurice. Seconds later, a person emerged from the back seat of the vehicle with a gun and began firing.
 
As the car raced away, Maurice fell to the ground.
 
Tyrone Bertrand, a retired Army National Guardsman, was one of the first responders during the tragedy on Sept. 11, 2001.  Unbeknownst to him at the time, his son's life would rely on similar actions by others.  People and friends ran to Maurice's rescue, performing first aid using the shirts from their body to stop the bleeding.
 
“I was bleeding excessively,” Maurice said.  “The last thing I remember saying was I am not going to make it.”
 
Fortunately, Maurice did make it.
 
He was rushed to Cooper Hospital in Camden, N.J., and later transferred to Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia where he woke up for the first time and saw loved ones at his bedside.  While Maurice might have doubted his chances of surviving, a person close to him was confident he would make it through.
 
“I felt like he was going to make it because of his fighting spirit, intestinal fortitude, and his belief in God,” Tyrone Bertrand said.
 
A number of family members, friends, coaches, and Lincoln University staff members visited Maurice at the hospital, while teammates Tim Green (Fanwood, N.J./Scotch Plains-Fanwood HS) and Michael Adjei (Woodbridge, Va./Woodbridge HS) called frequently.
 
“Maurice has been one of my closest friends outside of football,” Adjei said. “I called him every day to see how he was doing.”
 
Maurice began to make progress at Thomas Jefferson Hospital and was later sent to a rehabilitation center in Marlton, N.J., where he had to re-learn how to use his hands, walk, and bathe. Three weeks later, he was discharged from the rehabilitation center using crutches.  Maurice said he initially was not going to return to school, but in his mind, he did not want to fail himself.
 
Returning to Lincoln University in August 2011 presented numerous challenges.  According to Maurice, the doctors told him his chances of playing football again were slim. However, Lincoln University defensive coordinator, Herb Pickens said he was confident Maurice would one day return to the field because of his determination and work ethic.   
 
“I knew what Maurice goals were,” Pickens said.  “The first thing he told me when he left the hospital was don't count me out, coach. When he returned to school, he wanted to be treated like everyone else.  He didn't want any special accommodations.”
 
During the fall semester Maurice, an information technology major, worked hard in the classroom and in the athletic training room.  He served as a mentor for other student-athletes and cheered his teammates from the sideline. By December, Maurice's hard work had paid off as he was now walking without his crutches.
 
“Mr. Chris (Vigneault) and the athletic trainers were instrumental in helping me walk without the crutches,” Maurice said. “They did an excellent job working with me.”
 
In early March, he was once again back in pads at spring training camp.  If re-learning simple motor skills like gripping, clinching, walking, and bathing were challenges for him, just imagine re-learning football drills.
 
“In my head, I thought I might have to hang it up,” Maurice said.  “After about a week, I learned how to control the situation.”

Fast forward to now, and Maurice is one of the student-athletes controlling Lincoln's devasting defensive line, registering eight tackles. According to Maurice and his father, to their knowledge, the assailants were never apprehended by law enforcement. However, he has no regrets about his decision to intervene on that summer day.

"If I had to do it again, I would intervene like I did," Maurice said. "If I was in his shoes, I would want someone to do the same thing for me."
 
 
     
 
   
     

       
   
http://   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU
  #53 Maurice Bertrand
Defensive LinemanSenior6'2"280 lbsYonkers, N.Y. / Shaw Information Technology

8  Discussion / Sports Forum / Maurice Bertrand NFL Combine Regional Tryouts on: April 18, 2013, 02:12:25 PM
Hi Mr. Bertrand:


  I have posted the interview that I conducted with your son Maurice on Saturday night, here is the link to that video. 



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU


  I am so sorry to hear about this incident about Maurice, I can't even imagine what that must of been like for him and your entire family.  Especially when you consider that it wasn't even his fault.  What an outstanding comeback he has made, it proves that he really loves playing ball to be able to make it back in such a short time.  The most impressive thing about Maurice was that I couldn't even tell he was seriously injured at any point.  He just blended in with all the other young strong bucks that he was competing against.
  Feel free to follow me on twitter.  It is the best way to find out when all the other videos will be posted from that workout.  Thank you so much for your time.


God Bless


Robert Brewer


aka


Football Rob



-----Original Message-----
From: Tyrone Bertrand <tbert77798@yahoo.com>
To: rbrewer21 <rbrewer21@aol.com>
Sent: Sun, Feb 24, 2013 10:02 pm
Subject: Maurice Bertrand #174


Rob it was a Pleasure meeting you last night at the Tri-State Combine. Here more info on my Son and any help you provide willnot be forgotten when He make it to The Big Show.http://blogs.phillymag.com/the_philly_post/2012/10/26/video-lincoln-university-player-wounded-shooting-returns-field/
http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/local//region/46090-bullet-wounds-and-a-shattered-leg-cant-keep-this-college-football-player-off-the-field
http://www.lulions.com/news/2012/10/26/FB_1026122158.aspx
 
 
                                                                                                                                   Thanks
                                                                                                                                   Tyronehttp://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU


9  Discussion / General Discussion Forum / Re: Black Graduation Rates May Depend On....... on: April 11, 2013, 09:14:31 AM
Maurice Graduated last December . That was Grit and GOD'S Blessing.
10  Discussion / General Discussion Forum / Re: Black Graduation Rates May Depend On....... on: April 11, 2013, 09:09:49 AM
Maurice Bertrand, 53, makes a tackle during the Johnson C. Smith game
 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, Pa. – Over a year ago, Maurice Bertrand (Yonkers, N.Y./Cherry Hill HS) was fighting, not just for a spot on the football field, but for his life.
 
A typical summer break is filled with trips out of town, visits to the shore, block party celebrations, and graduations to name a few.  Some students look forward to this time off after enduring the rigors of the academic school year.  Maurice decided to spend June 26, 2011 at a memorial barbeque in Camden, N.J. dedicated to a teenage friend who passed away crossing a highway.
 
He had spent the previous Sunday, Father's Day, in church with his father.  The two at times are inseparable.  The bond between this father and son duo is inseparable. Maurice begged his father to teach him how to play football ever since he was 10 years-old and was struck with a baseball. Tyrone Bertrand, a Shaw University graduate, played defensive back for the Bears.
 
But on this Sunday, Maurice wanted to pay tribute to his friend.
 
“Maurice usually would have been at church, but this Sunday I told him I would let him go to the barbeque,” Tyrone R. Bertrand, Maurice's father, said.
 
Once Maurice arrived at the barbeque, he was tasked with buying barbeque sauce from the neighborhood store.  While walking to the local store, Maurice noticed something disturbing.
 
“I saw a person at the barbeque getting jump by a group of about five guys,”  Maurice said.
 
Instead of ignoring the situation, Maurice assumed the role of “Good Samaritan' and broke up the fight. At the time, everyone scattered and things were back to normal or so they seemed.
 
Maurice continued walking to the store and about 20 minutes later he finally purchased the sauce. Realizing everyone at the barbeque was probably getting restless for the sauce, Maurice began his journey back.
 
What happens next is like a scene from a movie.
 
Maurice noticed something familiar about a group of guys packed in a car.  As soon as he realized who they were, the car took off after him.  One of the guys in the vehicle noticed it was Maurice. Seconds later, a person emerged from the back seat of the vehicle with a gun and began firing.
 
As the car raced away, Maurice fell to the ground.
 
Tyrone Bertrand, a retired Army National Guardsman, was one of the first responders during the tragedy on Sept. 11, 2001.  Unbeknownst to him at the time, his son's life would rely on similar actions by others.  People and friends ran to Maurice's rescue, performing first aid using the shirts from their body to stop the bleeding.
 
“I was bleeding excessively,” Maurice said.  “The last thing I remember saying was I am not going to make it.”
 
Fortunately, Maurice did make it.
 
He was rushed to Cooper Hospital in Camden, N.J., and later transferred to Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia where he woke up for the first time and saw loved ones at his bedside.  While Maurice might have doubted his chances of surviving, a person close to him was confident he would make it through.
 
“I felt like he was going to make it because of his fighting spirit, intestinal fortitude, and his belief in God,” Tyrone Bertrand said.
 
A number of family members, friends, coaches, and Lincoln University staff members visited Maurice at the hospital, while teammates Tim Green (Fanwood, N.J./Scotch Plains-Fanwood HS) and Michael Adjei (Woodbridge, Va./Woodbridge HS) called frequently.
 
“Maurice has been one of my closest friends outside of football,” Adjei said. “I called him every day to see how he was doing.”
 
Maurice began to make progress at Thomas Jefferson Hospital and was later sent to a rehabilitation center in Marlton, N.J., where he had to re-learn how to use his hands, walk, and bathe. Three weeks later, he was discharged from the rehabilitation center using crutches.  Maurice said he initially was not going to return to school, but in his mind, he did not want to fail himself.
 
Returning to Lincoln University in August 2011 presented numerous challenges.  According to Maurice, the doctors told him his chances of playing football again were slim. However, Lincoln University defensive coordinator, Herb Pickens said he was confident Maurice would one day return to the field because of his determination and work ethic.   
 
“I knew what Maurice goals were,” Pickens said.  “The first thing he told me when he left the hospital was don't count me out, coach. When he returned to school, he wanted to be treated like everyone else.  He didn't want any special accommodations.”
 
During the fall semester Maurice, an information technology major, worked hard in the classroom and in the athletic training room.  He served as a mentor for other student-athletes and cheered his teammates from the sideline. By December, Maurice's hard work had paid off as he was now walking without his crutches.
 
“Mr. Chris (Vigneault) and the athletic trainers were instrumental in helping me walk without the crutches,” Maurice said. “They did an excellent job working with me.”
 
In early March, he was once again back in pads at spring training camp.  If re-learning simple motor skills like gripping, clinching, walking, and bathing were challenges for him, just imagine re-learning football drills.
 
“In my head, I thought I might have to hang it up,” Maurice said.  “After about a week, I learned how to control the situation.”

Fast forward to now, and Maurice is one of the student-athletes controlling Lincoln's devasting defensive line, registering eight tackles. According to Maurice and his father, to their knowledge, the assailants were never apprehended by law enforcement. However, he has no regrets about his decision to intervene on that summer day.

"If I had to do it again, I would intervene like I did," Maurice said. "If I was in his shoes, I would want someone to do the same thing for me."
 
 
     
 
   
     

       
   
http://   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU
  #53 Maurice Bertrand
Defensive LinemanSenior6'2"280 lbsYonkers, N.Y. / Shaw Information Technology

11  Discussion / Sports Forum / Re: ComeBack College Football Player of The Year on: April 06, 2013, 06:17:19 PM
 Hi Mr. Bertrand:


  I have posted the interview that I conducted with your son Maurice on Saturday night, here is the link to that video. 



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU


  I am so sorry to hear about this incident about Maurice, I can't even imagine what that must of been like for him and your entire family.  Especially when you consider that it wasn't even his fault.  What an outstanding comeback he has made, it proves that he really loves playing ball to be able to make it back in such a short time.  The most impressive thing about Maurice was that I couldn't even tell he was seriously injured at any point.  He just blended in with all the other young strong bucks that he was competing against.
  Feel free to follow me on twitter.  It is the best way to find out when all the other videos will be posted from that workout.  Thank you so much for your time.


God Bless


Robert Brewer


aka


Football Rob



-----Original Message-----
From: Tyrone Bertrand <tbert77798@yahoo.com>
To: rbrewer21 <rbrewer21@aol.com>
Sent: Sun, Feb 24, 2013 10:02 pm
Subject: Maurice Bertrand #174


Rob it was a Pleasure meeting you last night at the Tri-State Combine. Here more info on my Son and any help you provide willnot be forgotten when He make it to The Big Show.http://blogs.phillymag.com/the_philly_post/2012/10/26/video-lincoln-university-player-wounded-shooting-returns-field/
http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/local//region/46090-bullet-wounds-and-a-shattered-leg-cant-keep-this-college-football-player-off-the-field
http://www.lulions.com/news/2012/10/26/FB_1026122158.aspx
 
 
                                                                                                                                   Thanks
                                                                                                                                   Tyronehttp://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU


12  Discussion / Sports Forum / ComeBack College Football Player of The Year on: April 06, 2013, 06:10:05 PM
A typical summer break is filled with trips out of town, visits to the shore, block party celebrations, and graduations to name a few.  Some students look forward to this time off after enduring the rigors of the academic school year.  Maurice decided to spend June 26, 2011 at a memorial barbeque in Camden, N.J. dedicated to a teenage friend who passed away crossing a highway.
 
He had spent the previous Sunday, Father's Day, in church with his father.  The two at times are inseparable.  The bond between this father and son duo is inseparable. Maurice begged his father to teach him how to play football ever since he was 10 years-old and was struck with a baseball. Tyrone Bertrand, a Shaw University graduate, played defensive back for the Bears.
 
But on this Sunday, Maurice wanted to pay tribute to his friend.
 
“Maurice usually would have been at church, but this Sunday I told him I would let him go to the barbeque,” Tyrone R. Bertrand, Maurice's father, said.
 
Once Maurice arrived at the barbeque, he was tasked with buying barbeque sauce from the neighborhood store.  While walking to the local store, Maurice noticed something disturbing.
 
“I saw a person at the barbeque getting jump by a group of about five guys,”  Maurice said.
 
Instead of ignoring the situation, Maurice assumed the role of “Good Samaritan' and broke up the fight. At the time, everyone scattered and things were back to normal or so they seemed.
 
Maurice continued walking to the store and about 20 minutes later he finally purchased the sauce. Realizing everyone at the barbeque was probably getting restless for the sauce, Maurice began his journey back.
 
What happens next is like a scene from a movie.
 
Maurice noticed something familiar about a group of guys packed in a car.  As soon as he realized who they were, the car took off after him.  One of the guys in the vehicle noticed it was Maurice. Seconds later, a person emerged from the back seat of the vehicle with a gun and began firing.
 
As the car raced away, Maurice fell to the ground.
 
Tyrone Bertrand, a retired Army National Guardsman, was one of the first responders during the tragedy on Sept. 11, 2001.  Unbeknownst to him at the time, his son's life would rely on similar actions by others.  People and friends ran to Maurice's rescue, performing first aid using the shirts from their body to stop the bleeding.
 
“I was bleeding excessively,” Maurice said.  “The last thing I remember saying was I am not going to make it.”
 
Fortunately, Maurice did make it.
 
He was rushed to Cooper Hospital in Camden, N.J., and later transferred to Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia where he woke up for the first time and saw loved ones at his bedside.  While Maurice might have doubted his chances of surviving, a person close to him was confident he would make it through.
 
“I felt like he was going to make it because of his fighting spirit, intestinal fortitude, and his belief in God,” Tyrone Bertrand said.
 
A number of family members, friends, coaches, and Lincoln University staff members visited Maurice at the hospital, while teammates Tim Green (Fanwood, N.J./Scotch Plains-Fanwood HS) and Michael Adjei (Woodbridge, Va./Woodbridge HS) called frequently.
 
“Maurice has been one of my closest friends outside of football,” Adjei said. “I called him every day to see how he was doing.”
 
Maurice began to make progress at Thomas Jefferson Hospital and was later sent to a rehabilitation center in Marlton, N.J., where he had to re-learn how to use his hands, walk, and bathe. Three weeks later, he was discharged from the rehabilitation center using crutches.  Maurice said he initially was not going to return to school, but in his mind, he did not want to fail himself.
 
Returning to Lincoln University in August 2011 presented numerous challenges.  According to Maurice, the doctors told him his chances of playing football again were slim. However, Lincoln University defensive coordinator, Herb Pickens said he was confident Maurice would one day return to the field because of his determination and work ethic.   
 
“I knew what Maurice goals were,” Pickens said.  “The first thing he told me when he left the hospital was don't count me out, coach. When he returned to school, he wanted to be treated like everyone else.  He didn't want any special accommodations.”
 
During the fall semester Maurice, an information technology major, worked hard in the classroom and in the athletic training room.  He served as a mentor for other student-athletes and cheered his teammates from the sideline. By December, Maurice's hard work had paid off as he was now walking without his crutches.
 
“Mr. Chris (Vigneault) and the athletic trainers were instrumental in helping me walk without the crutches,” Maurice said. “They did an excellent job working with me.”
 
In early March, he was once again back in pads at spring training camp.  If re-learning simple motor skills like gripping, clinching, walking, and bathing were challenges for him, just imagine re-learning football drills.
 
“In my head, I thought I might have to hang it up,” Maurice said.  “After about a week, I learned how to control the situation.”

Fast forward to now, and Maurice is one of the student-athletes controlling Lincoln's devasting defensive line, registering eight tackles. According to Maurice and his father, to their knowledge, the assailants were never apprehended by law enforcement. However, he has no regrets about his decision to intervene on that summer day.

"If I had to do it again, I would intervene like I did," Maurice said. "If I was in his shoes, I would want someone to do the same thing for me."
 
http://http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/local//region/46090-bullet-wounds-and-a-shattered-leg-
13  Discussion / Sports Forum / Re: Maurice Bertrand NFL Combine Regional Tryouts on: February 25, 2013, 02:33:53 PM
Maurice Bertrand, 53, makes a tackle during the Johnson C. Smith game
 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, Pa. – Over a year ago, Maurice Bertrand (Yonkers, N.Y./Cherry Hill HS) was fighting, not just for a spot on the football field, but for his life.
 
A typical summer break is filled with trips out of town, visits to the shore, block party celebrations, and graduations to name a few.  Some students look forward to this time off after enduring the rigors of the academic school year.  Maurice decided to spend June 26, 2011 at a memorial barbeque in Camden, N.J. dedicated to a teenage friend who passed away crossing a highway.
 
He had spent the previous Sunday, Father's Day, in church with his father.  The two at times are inseparable.  The bond between this father and son duo is inseparable. Maurice begged his father to teach him how to play football ever since he was 10 years-old and was struck with a baseball. Tyrone Bertrand, a Shaw University graduate, played defensive back for the Bears.
 
But on this Sunday, Maurice wanted to pay tribute to his friend.
 
“Maurice usually would have been at church, but this Sunday I told him I would let him go to the barbeque,” Tyrone R. Bertrand, Maurice's father, said.
 
Once Maurice arrived at the barbeque, he was tasked with buying barbeque sauce from the neighborhood store.  While walking to the local store, Maurice noticed something disturbing.
 
“I saw a person at the barbeque getting jump by a group of about five guys,”  Maurice said.
 
Instead of ignoring the situation, Maurice assumed the role of “Good Samaritan' and broke up the fight. At the time, everyone scattered and things were back to normal or so they seemed.
 
Maurice continued walking to the store and about 20 minutes later he finally purchased the sauce. Realizing everyone at the barbeque was probably getting restless for the sauce, Maurice began his journey back.
 
What happens next is like a scene from a movie.
 
Maurice noticed something familiar about a group of guys packed in a car.  As soon as he realized who they were, the car took off after him.  One of the guys in the vehicle noticed it was Maurice. Seconds later, a person emerged from the back seat of the vehicle with a gun and began firing.
 
As the car raced away, Maurice fell to the ground.
 
Tyrone Bertrand, a retired Army National Guardsman, was one of the first responders during the tragedy on Sept. 11, 2001.  Unbeknownst to him at the time, his son's life would rely on similar actions by others.  People and friends ran to Maurice's rescue, performing first aid using the shirts from their body to stop the bleeding.
 
“I was bleeding excessively,” Maurice said.  “The last thing I remember saying was I am not going to make it.”
 
Fortunately, Maurice did make it.
 
He was rushed to Cooper Hospital in Camden, N.J., and later transferred to Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia where he woke up for the first time and saw loved ones at his bedside.  While Maurice might have doubted his chances of surviving, a person close to him was confident he would make it through.
 
“I felt like he was going to make it because of his fighting spirit, intestinal fortitude, and his belief in God,” Tyrone Bertrand said.
 
A number of family members, friends, coaches, and Lincoln University staff members visited Maurice at the hospital, while teammates Tim Green (Fanwood, N.J./Scotch Plains-Fanwood HS) and Michael Adjei (Woodbridge, Va./Woodbridge HS) called frequently.
 
“Maurice has been one of my closest friends outside of football,” Adjei said. “I called him every day to see how he was doing.”
 
Maurice began to make progress at Thomas Jefferson Hospital and was later sent to a rehabilitation center in Marlton, N.J., where he had to re-learn how to use his hands, walk, and bathe. Three weeks later, he was discharged from the rehabilitation center using crutches.  Maurice said he initially was not going to return to school, but in his mind, he did not want to fail himself.
 
Returning to Lincoln University in August 2011 presented numerous challenges.  According to Maurice, the doctors told him his chances of playing football again were slim. However, Lincoln University defensive coordinator, Herb Pickens said he was confident Maurice would one day return to the field because of his determination and work ethic.   
 
“I knew what Maurice goals were,” Pickens said.  “The first thing he told me when he left the hospital was don't count me out, coach. When he returned to school, he wanted to be treated like everyone else.  He didn't want any special accommodations.”
 
During the fall semester Maurice, an information technology major, worked hard in the classroom and in the athletic training room.  He served as a mentor for other student-athletes and cheered his teammates from the sideline. By December, Maurice's hard work had paid off as he was now walking without his crutches.
 
“Mr. Chris (Vigneault) and the athletic trainers were instrumental in helping me walk without the crutches,” Maurice said. “They did an excellent job working with me.”
 
In early March, he was once again back in pads at spring training camp.  If re-learning simple motor skills like gripping, clinching, walking, and bathing were challenges for him, just imagine re-learning football drills.
 
“In my head, I thought I might have to hang it up,” Maurice said.  “After about a week, I learned how to control the situation.”

Fast forward to now, and Maurice is one of the student-athletes controlling Lincoln's devasting defensive line, registering eight tackles. According to Maurice and his father, to their knowledge, the assailants were never apprehended by law enforcement. However, he has no regrets about his decision to intervene on that summer day.

"If I had to do it again, I would intervene like I did," Maurice said. "If I was in his shoes, I would want someone to do the same thing for me."
 
 
     
 
   
     

       
   
http://   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU
  #53 Maurice Bertrand
Defensive LinemanSenior6'2"280 lbsYonkers, N.Y. / Shaw Information Technology

14  Discussion / Sports Forum / Maurice Bertrand NFL Combine Regional Tryouts on: February 25, 2013, 02:24:10 PM
 Hi Mr. Bertrand:


  I have posted the interview that I conducted with your son Maurice on Saturday night, here is the link to that video.  



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU


  I am so sorry to hear about this incident about Maurice, I can't even imagine what that must of been like for him and your entire family.  Especially when you consider that it wasn't even his fault.  What an outstanding comeback he has made, it proves that he really loves playing ball to be able to make it back in such a short time.  The most impressive thing about Maurice was that I couldn't even tell he was seriously injured at any point.  He just blended in with all the other young strong bucks that he was competing against.
  Feel free to follow me on twitter.  It is the best way to find out when all the other videos will be posted from that workout.  Thank you so much for your time.


God Bless


Robert Brewer


aka


Football Rob
http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NLvbw0ylJU
15  Discussion / Sports Forum / Maurice Bertrand to next Level on: February 22, 2013, 10:51:44 AM
MAURICE BERTRAND
ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT TEAM
Name: Maurice Bertrand
Sport:
Football Position: Defensive Tackle
College:
Lincoln University
Hometown:
Cherry Hill, NJ
DOB:
11-8-87
Height:
6'1"
Weight:
285 lbs
225 lb Reps: 19x Vertical: TBD Pro Shuttle: TBD 40 Yard: 4.79 L Cone: TBD Broad Jump: TBD
Web: www.agencyathlete.com/clients/mbertrand Agent Advisor: Charles Wanner Phone: (215) 307-7309 Fax: (917) 677-8885 Email: charles.wanner@agencyathlete.com Athlete Contact: Maurice Bertrand Phone: (856) 571-0883 Email: reesebert@me.com
Maurice is a passionate football player who played DT for Lincoln University and has dealt with much adversity in his life that has made him a better man
In 2011, Maurice had the unfortunate experience of being in the wrong place at the wrong time in Camden, NJ and ended up being shot 5x where bullets were fired into his femur, arm and leg
Fortunately Maurice made a full recovery and is working hard to get one more opportunity of pursuing his dream of becoming a professional football player
Maurice is an inspiration for his positive attitude and is the type of player that would be an asset to your team both on and off the field
Maurice has good football instincts with a willingness to learn and develop as a player
Maurice has the work ethic, talent, heart, and determination to succeed as a professional football player, and will reward the team that signs him
College Resume:
2012 - Played in 7 games with 12 Tackles, 7 Solo, 3.5 TFL and 1.5 Sacks
2011 - Did not play due to medical reasons
2010 - Played in 7 games with 18 Tackles, 5 Solo and 1.5 Sacks
2012 - Lincoln University - Maurice Bertrand Highlights (#53) - http://youtu.be/WeZ0HNLzXVU
2012 - Video Interview - http://youtu.be/g3U23YkAZeQ
2012 - Article - Philly.com - http://player.ps/XMm3rf
2012 - Lincoln University - Roster Profile - http://player.ps/XMlGNf
Pages: [1] 2 3 » Last
Powered by EzPortal


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!