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Ebony disses Black folks
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Brother Tony
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« on: December 13, 2012, 01:07:47 PM »

BY: Peter Bailey

Reading Ebony Magazine’s feature article, “100 Most Influential African-Americans” in its December 2012-January 2013 issue, was very revealing on the low opinion the publication has of its readers in particular and of the larger Black community in general.
 
A brief statement before the listing proclaims, among other things, “…In this issue EBONY selects the 100 primary influencers and game changers who have made vital accomplishments during the past year.”
 
During a year of a presidential election, of continued economic dislocation, of the continued problem of dealing with Black-on-Black homicide among low-income Black males, the list published by the most widely distributed general interest Black magazine in the country includes a 16-year old gymnast, Gabby Douglas and 19-year old pro basketball player, Anthony Davis.
 
It also includes “Influential African-Americans” such as recording artists Rihanna and Cee Lo Green; forward NBA Le Bron James; entertainer Nicki Minaj; actor Jesse Williams; forward NBA Kevin Durant; celebrity stylist June Ambrose; actress/activist Jurnee Smollen; artist/musician/activist Theaster Gates; actor/radio and talk show host Steve Harvey; comedian/actor Kevin Hart; film critic, The Boston Globe Wesley Morris; and gospel artists Mary Mary.
 
Further listees as most influential African-Americans are event designer Diann Valentine; authors Ashley and Je Quavis; entertainment moguls Beyoncé and Jay-Z; singer and pianist Alice Hall Moran and Jason Moran; director TJ Martin, actor/publisher Zane; tennis player Serena Williams; television personality/ author Wendy Williams; quarterback NFL Cam Newton; and president of The Style Network, Salaam Coleman Sanith.
 
I am sure that all of the above are talented individuals. But there is no way, considering the times in which we are living, that they could be the year’s “primary influencers and game changers” among African-Americans.
 
Real most influential
 It is next to impossible to believe that they are more influential than Rev. Jeremiah Wright, who all year long has been delivering powerful, perceptive, solutions-oriented speeches and sermons at churches throughout the country; or then attorney Faya Rose Sanders, founder of the National Black Voting Rights Museum in Selma, Ala. and leader of a campaign against honoring with a statue Nathan Bedford Forrest, the former Confederate general who ordered the cold-blooded murder of 300 captured Black Union soldiers during the Civil War and who also founded the Klu Klux Klan, a terrorist organization.
 
They are also not more influential than George Fraser, whose FraserNet continued in 2012 being the “largest network of Black professionals in the world” or than former Essence editor-in-chief Susan Taylor, director of the National CARES Mentoring Movement which advances educational opportunities for many Black youngsters.
 
Living in never-never land
 There are numerous other Black folks who made major contributions in 2012. I once heard Ebony’s founder, the late John H. Johnson, whom I considered to be one of the major game-changers of the 20th century, say that his magazine basically reflects where Black folks are at any given time.
 
If that’s still the case, this article is graphic evidence that today’s Ebony believes that many, if not most of us, are living in some kind of economic and cultural never-never land. Ebony should be ashamed of itself.
 
Peter Bailey, a former associate editor of Ebony, is currently editor of Vital Issues: The Journal of African American Speeches.
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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2012, 01:17:55 PM »

Ebony has always been a low class magazine catering to the low class of the black community.

and  lol @ Rhianna being on the list. Didnt know St Michaels, Barbados was apart of the United States.
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« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2012, 01:54:18 PM »

Anyone can start their OWN publication and chose anyone you want--
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Capler
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« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2012, 02:39:32 PM »

Keep in mind the list is called 'most Influential' not the list of 'the most positive influence'.  When you look at it that way many of those names Ebony listed deserves to be on that list including Gabby Douglas and Nicki Minaj. Gabby is a household name to everyone and many many girls are running around dressing like Nicki.  For better or for worst, influence is influence.
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keithbusting
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« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2012, 02:53:19 PM »

The low class magazine" as someone on the forum has put it was at least in the majority of "low class"(again someone else's term) households along with its sister publication Jet magazine. The residents saw the pictures, they read the articles. As a result, they were inspired, they aspired and they achieved. That was then, this is now. Due to space limitations, I can't go into all I would like to say about the subject of discussion, it would consume too much cyberspace. However, I will say this those who are currently at the helm of Ebony magazine are dishonoring the memory of its founder John H. Johnson publishing these superficial features. The magazine wasn't always so celebrity oriented. Now it takes celebrities on the cover  in order for it to sell. Ordinary people don't get on the cover of  Ebony magazine anymore. Some of the "Influential African-Americans" featured on its pages have been hoodwinked and bamboozled. They either don't know it or they must be in denial. Some of them have mistaken never never land for the promised land that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke of in his mountain top speech in Memphis, Tennessee before he was assassinated.  Folks like this tend to be mentally dead. The only thing a conscious person can do is to tell 'em "have a nice day"!
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Neymar
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« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2012, 03:00:04 PM »

LOL just LOL.

I have been in the house of many of the old black American bourgeois and Ebony magazine is never present

Jet? Sometimes
Black Enterprise? Definitely.
Ebony?No
Sister 2 Sister? No.
Essence?No

They are the toilet paper of black publications now, and have been for a very long time.

They are very lucky like XXL and Source exist to keep them from being the absolute bottom of totem pole.
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« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2012, 05:36:08 PM »

Quote
LOL just LOL.

I have been in the house of many of the old black American bourgeois and Ebony magazine is never present

Jet? Sometimes
Black Enterprise? Definitely.
Ebony?No
Sister 2 Sister? No.
Essence?No

They are the toilet paper of black publications now, and have been for a very long time.

Meh....................that depends on what you consider "a very long time".

I'd have to agree with Capler on this one.
The feature says "most influential". I don't agree with everyone named but, certainly Gabby Douglas belongs on the list.
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« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2012, 11:03:15 PM »

Neymar, I find it interesting. You consistently berate anything remotely popular in the AA community yet you received an educational from an HBCU.

I may be in the minority but I think Ebony has vastly improved. Sure the NeNe Leakes cover was tacky but it deviated from the normal Beyonce, Oprah, Janet, Denzel gush-fest that Black publications have shoved down Black consumers throats.
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« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2012, 01:43:00 AM »

I think I can see where, Neymar is coming from in his assessment. What many see and popular or influential these days appeal to the lowest common denominator, insulting the sensibilities of many who crave more substance and quality.
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« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2012, 06:42:55 AM »

I think I can see where, Neymar is coming from in his assessment. What many see and popular or influential these days appeal to the lowest common denominator, insulting the sensibilities of many who crave more substance and quality.

I concur.
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« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2012, 12:25:08 PM »

I don't think that Ebony is low class. For someone who thinks Black American culture is so deplorable, you sure like being around us Neymar. You attended an HBCU, you frequently post on a website dedicated to HBCU sports, entertainment interests, news and other juicy topics. SMH But I digress...

I agree that this isn't the greatest list of political or social figures. Ebony has become an entertainment magazine. In order for it to survive, it had to change with the times. People are increasingly interested in constant entertainment and fun stimulation. Black folk quite often don't want to read or hear about the leg work folk like Susan Taylor are doing. So, I do understand the listing. Maybe it should be called the "Tastemakers List" because that's really what Rihanna and Beyonce are. They influence fashion and popular culture.
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